dianoetic


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dianoetic

(ˌdaɪənəʊˈɛtɪk)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to thought, esp to discursive reasoning rather than intuition. Compare discursive2
[C17: from Greek dianoētikos, from dianoia the thinking process, an opinion, from dia- + noein to think]

dianoetic

relating to the operation of the mind through logical rather than intuitive thought processes; intellectual activity.
See also: Thinking
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dianoetic - proceeding to a conclusion by reason or argument rather than intuition
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
logical - capable of or reflecting the capability for correct and valid reasoning; "a logical mind"
References in periodicals archive ?
DIANOETIC A Capable of thought B Passing through a node C A whole octave who am I?
22) The advantage of the plasticity of mathematics, of that set of statements or propositions, which Plato referred to as dianoia or dianoetic knowledge, (23) has considerable advantages as it allows for considerable flexibility in the way in which human beings develop their ideas about the universe.
Dianoetic thought includes the deductive, inductive, and evaluative use of fundamentals or principles (archai) discovered by the mind, whether these underlie mathematics, science, the arts, or stand as the basic cultural presuppositions or "first things" of a culture or community.
It is through the Leopardian and Beckettian dianoetic laugh, analyzed in the Operette Morali, Zibaldone di pensieri and Beckett's play Krapp 's Last Tape, that this paradoxical desire is expressed.
Another, and congenial, discrimination is picked up by Scotus through his keeping apart intellectual and rational powers: providing the historical distinction between dianoetic and noetic cognition with his personal flavour, Scotus limits intellectual powers to deal with problems of natural causality, while ratio has become in his interpretation a denaturalized capacity, a ground for will to strive for the good unavailable to intellect.
Pritzl does just this, and from his exquisitely Aristotelian study of Aristotle, we learn, among other things, that there is a "prepredicative" discursive activity of nous that allows for error, even before the act of judgment; and that there is a subtle distinction between intuitive, noetic "contact" with simples, which is infallible, and discursive, dianoetic judgment of composites, which can err.
14) In his seminars during the 1920s, Heidegger approaches the question about the activity of philosophy through a reading of Aristotle's presentation of the five dianoetic virtues of the soul in the sixth book of the Nicomachean Ethics: techne, phronesis, episteme, sophia and nous.
Certainly Zeno realized that, if it is logically undecidable that the faster catches up or does not catch up with the slower, he deals solely with the freedom of the subject in deciding the undecidable by stating the impossibility of catching up with the slower, for it is surely impossible to refute such a statement by dianoetic means of logical inference -- as paradoxical and as absurd as they may be or appear.
Among human beings, the capacity for sensitivity is gathered up into a dianoetic soul and the possibility of a still higher life and function is introduced (Generation of Animals 731a30-b7).
The grimacing smile elicited by her plays has been defined by Beckett in his early novel, Watt, as "the dianoetic laugh.