dianoia

dianoia

(ˌdaɪəˈnɔɪə)
n
1. (Philosophy) perception and experience regarded as lower modes of knowledge. Compare noesis
2. (Philosophy) the faculty of discursive reasoning
[from Greek; see dianoetic]

dianoia

the capacity for, process of, or result of discursive thinking. — dianoetic, adj.
See also: Thinking
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References in periodicals archive ?
Since both noesis and dianoia correspond to invariable objects, the line's account of rationality is not a counterpart to Aristotle's practical rationality.
The physician Aretaios describes the consequences of epilepsy in damaging the patient's dianoia and causing his mOrainein.
Graham models Frye's dialectical reasoning by presenting what Frye terms the mythos and dianoia of literature, providing a parallel to the opposition between the aesthetic and historical criticism that he discusses at the beginning of the chapter.
He consistently stresses that dianoia or ratio--discursive reason--requires contact with the transtemporal and transspatial realities of the Logos of God if it is to connect with the eternal meaning of finite beings and to carry out sound deductions.
He is forever moving back and forth between opposing poles of reference: knowledge and experience, space and time, stasis and movement, the individual and society, tradition and innovation, synthesis and analysis, engagement and detachment, freedom and concern, mythos and dianoia, the world and the grain of sand, immanence and transcendence, and scores, nay, hundreds of other oppositions.
Arendt's reading of Aristotle suggests, however, that there is an underlying set of issues, perspectives and terminology (with central terms such as praxis, eudaimonia, dianoia, pathos, lexis, etc, being used in both texts) common to the Ethics and the Poetics.
Anche per Gravina il punto di partenza e Aristotele, il quale per "sentenza" intenderebbe parlare della dianoia e non della gnome come generalmente si intende.
At the level of thinking, it will be demonstrated that the Shona saying muninga dzepfungwa (deep thoughts) has the equivalence of Plato's dianoia where Shona sages go beyond imagination and beliefto be deeply engaged in deep thoughts about the cosmos and their everyday experiences in society.
In Plato's divided line, the equivalence of mathematics and dianoia shows that mathematics plays an important preliminary role in education.
Dianoia is understood as thought or theme and the conflict "between beauty and cynicism" (Wilson 4), the two extremes that defined the Final leads to an aesthetic concern as ethical crisis.
For when the body is awake the soul is its servant (toi somati hupereteousa), and is never her own mistress (aute heoutes), but divides her attention among many things, assigning a part of it to each faculty of the body--to hearing, to sight, to touch, to walking, and to acts of the whole body; but the mind never enjoys independence (aute de heoutes he dianoia ou gignetai).