Diaspora

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Di·as·po·ra

 (dī-ăs′pər-ə)
n.
1. The dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century bc, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time.
2. often diaspora The body of Jews or Jewish communities outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. diaspora
a. A dispersion of a people from their original homeland.
b. The community formed by such a people: "the glutinous dish known throughout the [West African] diaspora as ... fufu" (Jonell Nash).
4. diaspora A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk).

[Greek diasporā, dispersion, from diaspeirein, to spread about : dia-, apart; see dia- + speirein, to sow, scatter; see sper- in Indo-European roots.]

di·as′po·ric, di·as′po·ral adj.

Diaspora

(daɪˈæspərə)
n
1. (Historical Terms)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (Peoples)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
3. (Bible) (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
5. (Sociology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
6. (Peoples) Caribbean the descendants of Sub-Saharan African peoples living anywhere in the Western hemisphere
[C19: from Greek: a scattering, from diaspeirein to disperse, from dia- + speirein to scatter, sow; see spore]

Di•as•po•ra

(daɪˈæs pər ə)

n.
1. the scattering of the Jews to countries outside of Palestine after the Babylonian captivity.
2. (often l.c.) the body of Jews living in countries outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. such countries collectively.
4. (l.c.) any group migration or flight from a country or region; dispersion.
5. (l.c.) any group that has been dispersed outside its traditional homeland.
[1875–80; < Greek diasporá a dispersion, n. derivative of diaspeîrein to scatter. See dia-, spore]

Diaspora

the scattering of the Jews after the period of Babylonian exile.
See also: Judaism

diaspora

1. A Greek word meaning scattering, used to mean the dispersion of a people to other parts of the world, or the worldwide communities of a people, especially of the Jews.
2. The dispersion and exile of Jews, first by the destruction of the kingdom of Israel and of the kingdom of Judah and later by improved communications, commercial opportunities and especially the spread of the Roman Empire. Jews were scattered throughout Europe, Asia, and later North America. This dispersion was sometimes forced, such as in the exile to Babylon in 586 BC and at the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in AD 70.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israeldiaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
2.Diaspora - the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time
dispersion, scattering - spreading widely or driving off
3.diaspora - the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture)
dispersion, distribution - the spatial or geographic property of being scattered about over a range, area, or volume; "worldwide in distribution"; "the distribution of nerve fibers"; "in complementary distribution"
Translations

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] Ndiáspora f

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] ndiaspora f
the Irish diaspora → la diaspora irlandaise

diaspora

nDiaspora f

Diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] nDiaspora

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] n (frm) → diaspora
References in periodicals archive ?
There is therefore, need for the provisions of the Bill to be expanded to provide for issues such as methods of voting, types of elections and eligibility for voting by Diasporas.
After a chapter on the motivation of these professionals, the second section focuses on micro reforms that diasporas and returning migrants trigger in their countries of origin, highlighting cases on social entrepreneurs from the Indian diaspora and returnees to India promoting micro-level changes in the delivery of social services; members of Africa's diasporas and reforms in higher education; micro reforms in a destination country (the United States) that have failed to occur; and diaspora-induced micro reforms that have been scaled up in Taiwan and Morocco.
The issue of strengthening cooperation between the Diasporas of the council's member states spreading the ideas of the Turkic World Union and uniting efforts for their implementation, defining a strategy for further activity and creating an advisory council of state agencies responsible for diaspora affairs of the Cooperation Council of Turkic-speaking countries' member states will take prominence.
The image of the homeland that diasporas carry could be real (an existing country) or imagined (a future country).
For many Armenian diasporas, the question of return was, and still is, very puzzling since for centuries there has been no single, clearly defined center and periphery acknowledged by all Armenians, and they have also gradually become more at home in their hostlands.
Christine Fair, "The Sri Lankan Tamil Diaspora: Sustaining Conflict and Pushing for Peace," Diasporas in Conflict: Peace-makers or Peace-wreckers?
com), is developing very well and expanding into a global platform where the diasporas, their country of origin and their host countries work together to solve each other's problems mutually.
Dimensions of African and Other Diasporas (University of the West Indies Press, 2014, pp.
Background : Increasingly, national development agencies in countries of origin and international organizations engage diasporas directly for projects of international cooperation, based on their shared interests in harnessing the development of countries of origin.
Published as a part of the Edinburgh Centenary Series on Christian mission, Global Diasporas and Mission is an edited volume that explores global diasporas and their implications for twenty-first-century mission.
The government through the ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation will help address the concerns of the Diasporas only if they are organized in form of a South Sudanese community wherever they are, Machar added.
I World Forum of Kyrgyz Diasporas abroad was held in New York City (USA) on March 23-25, reported the press service of Kyrgyz Club.