diastasis

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di·as·ta·sis

 (dī-ăs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. di·as·ta·ses (-sēz′)
1. Separation of normally joined anatomical parts, as of certain abdominal muscles during pregnancy.
2. The last stage of diastole in the heart, occurring just before contraction and during which little additional blood enters the ventricle.

[Greek, separation, from diistanai, to separate : dia-, apart; see dia- + histanai, to cause to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

di′a·stat′ic (dī′ə-stăt′ĭk) adj.

diastasis

(daɪˈæstəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Pathology) pathol
a. the separation of an epiphysis from the long bone to which it is normally attached without fracture of the bone
b. the separation of any two parts normally joined
2. (Physiology) physiol the last part of the diastolic phase of the heartbeat
[C18: New Latin, from Greek: a separation, from diistanai to separate, from dia- + histanai to place, make stand]
diastatic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diastasis - separation of an epiphysis from the long bone to which it is normally attached without fracture of the bone
dislocation - a displacement of a part (especially a bone) from its normal position (as in the shoulder or the vertebral column)
Translations

di·as·ta·sis

n. diastasis.
1. separación anormal de partes unidas esp. huesos;
2. tiempo de descanso del ciclo cardíaco inmediatamente anterior a la sístole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Painful os peroneum syndrome (POPS) results from a wide spectrum of conditions, including fractures or diastases, and may result in tenosynovitis or even rupture of the peroneal tendon [1].
Phosphorus, ferrous, carbohydrates and diastases found in this plant lead to remedying all disorders resulted from cachexia, weakness and loss of weight, strengthening pancreas function including increasing insulin secretion and regulating body natural metabolism [9].
In order to confirm that all parameters were within the values permissible according to the international regulations of quality (EU, 2001; Codex Alimentarius, 2001), the samples were tested by their organoleptic characteristics (flavor and scent) and the usual available physico-chemical tests [ashes (%), electrical conductivity (mS/cm), color (mm Pfund), pH, free acidity (mEq/kg), and humidity (%)] (AOAC, 1990), diastases index (U Schade) by qualitative tests for authenticity and by HMF test (mg/kg) for quality.