diatonicism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

di·a·ton·ic

 (dī′ə-tŏn′ĭk)
adj. Music
Of or using only the seven tones of a standard scale without chromatic alterations.

[Late Latin diatonicus, from Greek diatonikos : dia-, dia- + tonos, tone; see tone.]

di′a·ton′i·cal·ly adv.
di′a·ton′i·cism (-ĭ-sĭz′əm) n.

diatonicism

the use of the diatonic scale of five whole tones and two halftones in the composition of music. Also diatonism. Cf. chromaticism.
See also: Music
References in periodicals archive ?
The music of "the Second Viennese School", which included composers Arnold Schoenberg and his pupils Anton Webern and Alban Berg, created a seismic shift in the western tradition of classical music, moving away from diatonicism and towards heterodox terrain in tonality and form.
The most striking feature of both Nielsen's songs and symphonies is a kind of shifting diatonicism, creating what Daniel Grimley has described as a "fractured musical surface.
Diatonicism is abandoned and the chromaticism from the introduction is employed once again, which increases the intensity of the music as line four of the poem (mm.
The most salient traits of Kapral's style are unexpected modulations, flexible diatonicism (mainly major/minor oscillations) and modality, employment of ninth, augmented and fourth chords, quasi improvisations, a penchant for repetition of the motif in various harmonic, dynamic and other connections, finales in pp, brilliant piano stylisations with spread chords in the left hand and use of extreme positions of instrumental playing.
Glinka's supporters were baffled, however, by the composer's next nationalist opera, Ruslan i Liudmila (1842), which abandoned the musical unity of A Life in favor of a mix of styles and replaced the folk stylizations of the earlier opera with West European diatonicism.
Chapters are devoted to recent techniques including free diatonicism, serialism, and indeterminacy.
The negative responses to Del Tredici's so-called 'neo-Romantic' music complained that its 'sentimental statement only comes across as a gross overstatement', (35) and that it has 'collapsed into simpleminded Victorian diatonicism, melodic banality, and excess .
Instead, Rooke repeats the last phrases of the B section text as the count tries to wander chromatically but is called back to the diatonicism and broken chord accompaniment of the A section (mm.