dichogamy


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Related to dichogamy: heterostyly

di·chog·a·mous

 (dī-kŏg′ə-məs)
adj.
Having pistils and stamens that mature at different times, thus promoting cross-pollination rather than self-pollination.

di·chog′a·my (-mē) n.

dichogamy

(daɪˈkɒɡəmɪ)
n
(Botany) the maturation of male and female parts of a flower at different times, preventing automatic self-pollination. Compare homogamy2
diˈchogamous, dichogamic adj

dichogamy

the condition, in some flowering plants, in which the pistils and stamens mature at different times, thus preventing self-pollination. — dichogamous, adj.
See also: Flowers, Plants
Translations
Dichogamie
hermaphrodisme séquentielhermaphrodisme successif
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References in periodicals archive ?
2016) evaluated the floral biology of 'Isabel" cultivar and also observed the absence of dichogamy strategy in flowers.
Dichogamy, partial self-incompatibility, and inbreeding depression during embryo development may be sufficient to exclude inbred progeny from the seeds of these maples.
Outcrossing rates may change along with a variety of factors, both genetic and environmental, including loss of pollinators often associated with shifts in habitat (Ganders 1978; Delph 1990b; Weller and Sakai 1990); changes in dichogamy and floral morphology (e.
In the melittophilous Uvaria concava and in Unonopsis species this strict protogynous dichogamy without overlapping of the pistillate and staminate stages is suspended.
There is no dichogamy in the species as the anthers released pollen as soon as the flower opened.
Movements of floral organs involved in herkogamy and dichogamy are restricted to the symmetry plane.
Here we suggest that it could also be a case of herkogamy or dichogamy, preventing selfing.
Intraspecific surveys of mating system variation among populations have demonstrated associations between levels of outcrossing and a variety of demographic and genetic factors including flower color (Horovitz and Harding 1972), degree of dichogamy (i.
Factors such as dichogamy (temporal separation of sexual functions within flowers) and pollinator directionality (movement of pollinators along inflorescences) may produce such differences in the mating environment of flowers (Darwin 1877; Pellmyr 1987; Brunet 1990).