dichotomous key


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dichotomous key

n
(Botany) a key used to identify a plant or animal in which each stage presents descriptions of two distinguishing characters, with a direction to another stage in the key, until the species is identified
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Based on data associated with variable means, in addition to data ranges, the following dichotomous key for species delineation was developed using interquartile values.
In our second-semester curriculum we cover classification and how to use a dichotomous key.
The dichotomous key employs a series of pairs of contrasting statements (couplets) related to morphological features of the organism being identified.
This article presents a simple technique for easy viewing of lake plankton communities, a simple dichotomous key that will ease students into the identification process, and a suggestion for an exercise to demonstrate changes in community structure as a result of seasonal succession.
A dichotomous key to the known Zadadra species is also given.
The authors suggest places to visit to further study each type of natural community and provide a comprehensive glossary of ecological terms, as well as a dichotomous key for aiding field identification.
Future work will further test these conclusions and our goal is to produce a more useful dichotomous key to California pipefishes.
This section presents a dichotomous key to Keys A through N with page numbers.
It does not closely resemble the other species of the genus Egglestonichthys; indeed, all four described species are rather different from each other in body form and colour pattern (see Remarks and dichotomous key below).
The Illustrated Taxonomy Manual of Weed Seeds (Delorit, 1970) covers 192 species with a dichotomous key to aid in searching, and Weed Seeds of the Great Plains: A Handbook for Identification (Davis, 1993) covers 280 species with a polychotomous key.
Have students create a dichotomous key to identify their backpacks.
Using photographs of bones in museum collections, along with clarifying text and drawings, Bochenski and Tomek provide a dichotomous key using all major skeletal elements of higher systematic units--orders, families, and genera--containing domesticated species of birds.