dichotomy


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Related to dichotomy: Dichotomy paradox

di·chot·o·my

 (dī-kŏt′ə-mē)
n. pl. di·chot·o·mies
1. A division into two contrasting parts or categories: the dichotomy between rural and urban communities; regards the division between nature and nurture as a false dichotomy.
2. Astronomy The phase of the moon, Mercury, or Venus when half of the disk is illuminated.
3. Botany Branching characterized by successive forking into two approximately equal divisions.

[Greek dikhotomiā, from dikhotomos, divided in two : dikho-, dicho- + temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

dichotomy

(daɪˈkɒtəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. division into two parts or classifications, esp when they are sharply distinguished or opposed: the dichotomy between eastern and western cultures.
2. (Logic) logic the division of a class into two mutually exclusive subclasses: the dichotomy of married and single people.
3. (Botany) botany a simple method of branching by repeated division into two equal parts
4. (Astronomy) the phase of the moon, Venus, or Mercury when half of the disc is visible
[C17: from Greek dichotomia; see dicho-, -tomy]
diˈchotomous, dichotomic adj
diˈchotomously adv
Usage: Dichotomy should always refer to a division of some kind into two groups. It is sometimes used to refer to a puzzling situation which seems to involve a contradiction, but this use is generally thought to be incorrect

di•chot•o•my

(daɪˈkɒt ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. division into two parts or kinds; subdivision into halves or pairs.
2. division into two exclusive, opposed, or contradictory groups: a dichotomy between thought and action.
3. a mode of branching by constant forking, as in some stems.
4. the phase of the moon or of an inferior planet when half of its disk is visible.
[1600–10; < Greek]

dichotomy

division of material into two parts for the purpose of classification. — dichotomist, n.
See also: Classification
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dichotomy - being twofold; a classification into two opposed parts or subclasses; "the dichotomy between eastern and western culture"
categorisation, categorization, classification - a group of people or things arranged by class or category

dichotomy

noun division, gulf, split, separation, polarity, disjunction a dichotomy between the academic world and the industrial world
Usage: Dichotomy should always refer to a division of some kind into two groups. It is sometimes used to refer to a puzzling situation, which seems to involve a contradiction, but this use is thought by many to be incorrect, and dilemma is a more appropriate alternative.
Translations

dichotomy

[dɪˈkɒtəmɪ] Ndicotomía f

dichotomy

[daɪˈkɒtəmi] ndichotomie f
a dichotomy between → une dichotomie entre

dichotomy

nTrennung f, → Dichotomie f

dichotomy

[dɪˈkɒtəmɪ] n (frm) → dicotomia

di·chot·o·my

, dichotomization
n. dicotomía, dicotomización, división en dos partes; bifurcación.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, the false dichotomy is between criticism and support.
52) is that the geometrically calculated moment of dichotomy can vary from the time of greatest separation by up to about 2.
Rooted richly in culture, art and early film history, these dermatological findings are used primarily to elucidate the dichotomy of good and evil through visual representation and may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease," the study concluded.
From a 2014 international seminar on comparative labor law in Gaeta, Italy, 15 papers address the decline of the standard employment relationship between worker and company not in terms of the usual dichotomy of typical/atypical, but of the dichotomy of core/contingent work.
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 15, 2016-LeEco Acquires US Film Production Company Dichotomy Creative
Lind's preface suggests a uniting theme of investigating the meaning, significance, or appropriateness of the classical dichotomy between the combatant and the civilian, and several of the essays do take that as their central mission, but whatever other value they may have, Kaspersen's and Roslyng-Jensen's do not.
Tonu Onnepalu's dense novel explores the dichotomy of a man who has been away for a long time returning home and his doubts about where he belongs.
The dichotomy he establishes between strategy and "statecraft" does little to improve our understanding of how states behave, or of why their policies succeed or fail.
The literature bears evidence to the effect that those with different MBTI scores/results had different learning styles (Myers et al, 1998); however, most of the research solely reported patterns of correlation between a single dichotomy and other variables.
In this work for academics and students, he explores the dichotomy between international trade and environmental law and the effect of this dichotomy on the development of legal regimes in both fields, with a special focus on the WTO's procedure for dispute resolution and its impact on member countries and international treaties.
Yemen: the Dichotomy of Revolution "Whatever the commonalities or differences, all perspectives must be allowed to flourish if democracy is truly to take root in Yemen.
The idea of dichotomy has had broad usage in a variety of work contexts as part of career and workforce analysis: for example, women framed as employed/unemployed (Frye, 1978); the 'people problem'/management (Gordon, 1983); career/ personal (Croteau & Thiel, 1993; Haverkamp & Moore, 1993), work/family (Bruce & Reed, 1994); gendered segregation in computing (Whitehouse & Diamond, 2006); young designers/mature skills (Haley, 2008); politics/administration (Overeem, 2008); and a related example using dialectic can be seen in Foster's (2005) career/motherhood study.