dickey


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Related to dickey: dickie

dick·ey

also dick·ie or dick·y  (dĭk′ē)
n. pl. dick·eys also dick·ies
1.
a. A woman's blouse front worn under a suit jacket or low-necked garment.
b. A man's detachable shirt front.
c. A collar for a shirt.
d. A child's bib or pinafore.
2. Chiefly British
a. The driver's seat on a carriage.
b. A rear seat for servants on a carriage.

[ From diminutive of Dick, nickname for Richard.]

dick•ey1

or dick•y

(ˈdɪk i)

n., pl. dick•eys or dick•ies.
1. a garment that resembles the front or collar of a shirt and is worn as a separate piece under a jacket, dress, or the like. Compare vest (def. 2), vestee.
2. a small bird.
3. a donkey, esp. a male.
4. an outside seat on a carriage.
[1745–55; generic use of Dicky, diminutive of Dick, proper name]

dick•ey2

(ˈdɪk i)

adj. Chiefly Brit. Informal.
functioning poorly; faulty: a dickey engine.
[1805–15; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dickey - a small third seat in the back of an old-fashioned two-seaterdickey - a small third seat in the back of an old-fashioned two-seater
backseat - a seat at the back of a vehicle (especially the seat at the back of an automobile)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.dickey - a man's detachable insert (usually starched) to simulate the front of a shirt
insert, inset - an artifact that is inserted or is to be inserted
shirt - a garment worn on the upper half of the body
Adj.1.dickey - (British informal) faulty; "I've got this dicky heart"- John le Carre
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
impaired - diminished in strength, quality, or utility; "impaired eyesight"
Translations

dickey

[ˈdɪkɪ]
A. N
1. (= shirt front) → pechera f postiza
2. (Brit) (also dickey bow) → pajarita f (Sp), corbata f de moño (LAm)
3. (Brit) (also dickey seat) → spider m
B. CPD dickey bird N (baby talk) → pajarito m
I won't say a dickey birdno diré ni pío

dickey

, dicky
n
(inf, on shirt) → Hemdbrust f; (= bow tie)Fliege f
(also dickey seat)Notsitz m (in einem Zweisitzer)
References in classic literature ?
To purchasing bran new paper shirt collar or dickey, to set off gray Petersham.
The item chiefly disputed in this bill was the very moderate charge of two pennies for the dickey.
Three outside places were vacant; one behind the coachman; two on the dickey.
It was within a week of the close of the month of July, that a hackney cabriolet, number unrecorded, was seen to proceed at a rapid pace up Goswell Street; three people were squeezed into it besides the driver, who sat in his own particular little dickey at the side; over the apron were hung two shawls, belonging to two small vixenish-looking ladies under the apron; between whom, compressed into a very small compass, was stowed away, a gentleman of heavy and subdued demeanour, who, whenever he ventured to make an observation, was snapped up short by one of the vixenish ladies before-mentioned.
Folks like to take the hassle out of the holiday by pre-ordering a delicious holiday feast including Cajun-Fried and Smoked Turkey or Barbecue Honey Ham complete with traditional holiday sides," said Roland Dickey, Jr.
Between Lovers by Eric Jerome Dickey Dutton, July 2001, $23.
Though the late James Dickey wrote 20 volumes of poetry, as well as plays, screenplays, journalism and criticism, it was John Boorman's 1972 film of Dickey's hair-raising novel ``Deliverance'' that turned the hulking, hard-drinking Georgia author into a pop-culture fixture.
Author Eric Jerome Dickey, called the "brotherman novelist" in some publishing circles, seems to get better with each book.
James Dickey, one of the nation's most distinguished modern poets and an essayist, critic, lecturer and teacher perhaps best known for his rugged novel ``Deliverance,'' died Sunday in Columbia, S.
The Dickey family congratulates Albert Barreno on opening his first Dickey's store, the 88[sup.
ClickCadence president, Michael Dickey said the rebranding is designed to support his company's aggressive growth plan.
Dickey's has always been a family company, and we are proud to partner with the Lockett family in this venture," said Roland Dickey, Jr.