inveterate


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Related to inveterate: impecuniosity, repugnancy

in·vet·er·ate

 (ĭn-vĕt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1. Firmly and long established; deep-rooted: inveterate preferences.
2. Persisting in an ingrained habit; habitual: an inveterate liar. See Synonyms at chronic.

[Middle English, from Latin inveterātus, past participle of inveterārī, to grow old, endure : in-, causative pref.; see in-2 + vetus, veter-, old; see wet-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

in·vet′er·a·cy (-ər-ə-sē), in·vet′er·ate·ness n.
in·vet′er·ate·ly adv.

inveterate

(ɪnˈvɛtərɪt)
adj
1. long established, esp so as to be deep-rooted or ingrained: an inveterate feeling of hostility.
2. (prenominal) settled or confirmed in a habit or practice, esp a bad one; hardened: an inveterate smoker.
3. obsolete full of hatred; hostile
[C16: from Latin inveterātus of long standing, from inveterāre to make old, from in-2 + vetus old]
inˈveteracy, inˈveterateness n
inˈveterately adv

in•vet•er•ate

(ɪnˈvɛt ər ɪt)

adj.
1. confirmed in a habit, feeling, or the like: an inveterate gambler.
2. firmly established by long continuance, as a disease; chronic.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin inveterātus, orig. past participle of inveterāre to grow old, allow to grow old, preserve =in- in-2 + veterāre, v. derivative of vetus, s. veter- old; compare veteran]
in•vet′er•a•cy (-ə si) n.
in•vet′er•ate•ly, adv.
in•vet′er•ate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inveterate - habitual; "a chronic smoker"
usual - occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure; "grew the usual vegetables"; "the usual summer heat"; "came at the usual time"; "the child's usual bedtime"
Adv.1.inveterate - in a habitual and longstanding manner; "smoking chronically"

inveterate

adjective
2. deep-rooted, entrenched, ingrained, deep-seated, incurable, established the inveterate laziness of these boys
3. staunch, long-standing, dyed-in-the-wool, deep-dyed (usually derogatory) the spirit of an inveterate Tory

inveterate

adjective
2. Subject to a disease or habit for a long time:
Translations
inveteradomaligno

inveterate

[ɪnˈvetərɪt] ADJ [gambler] → empedernido; [laziness, selfishness] → inveterado

inveterate

[ɪnˈvɛtərət] adjinvétéré(e)

inveterate

adj dislike, hatredtief verwurzelt, abgrundtief; lazinesschronisch; opposition, prejudice, habithartnäckig; enemiesunversöhnlich; liar, gamblerunverbesserlich; collector, travellerpassioniert; inveterate smoker/criminalGewohnheitsraucher(in) m(f)/-verbrecher(in) m(f)

inveterate

[ɪnˈvɛtrɪt] adj (habit, gambler) → inveterato/a; (liar, smoker) → incallito/a
References in classic literature ?
Everyone was a friend, and she offered kisses to a stranger so confidingly that the most inveterate bachelor relented, and baby-lovers became faithful worshipers.
cried the inveterate forester, whose prejudices contributed so largely to veil his natural sense of justice in all matters which concerned the Mingoes; "a lying and deceitful varlet as he is.
Clifford was indeed the most inveterate of conservatives.
This name was given, we are told, in former days, by the good housewives of the adjacent country, from the inveterate propensity of their husbands to linger about the village tavern on market days.
It is only indispensable with an inveterate running whale; its grand fact and feature is the wonderful distance to which the long lance is accurately darted from a violently rocking, jerking boat, under extreme headway.
Paul de Cassagnac, the most inveterate of the French duelists, had suffered so often in this way that he is at last a confirmed invalid; and the best physician in Paris has expressed the opinion that if he goes on dueling for fifteen or twenty years more--unless he forms the habit of fighting in a comfortable room where damps and draughts cannot intrude--he will eventually endanger his life.
She was an inveterate experimenter in these things.
After every successful trade he generally passed a longer or shorter term in jail; for when a poor man without goods or chattels has the inveterate habit of swapping, it follows naturally that he must have something to swap; and having nothing of his own, it follows still more naturally that he must swap something belonging to his neighbors.
In that manner Hareton, who should now be the first gentleman in the neighbourhood, was reduced to a state of complete dependence on his father's inveterate enemy; and lives in his own house as a servant, deprived of the advantage of wages: quite unable to right himself, because of his friendlessness, and his ignorance that he has been wronged.
Vanstone's inveterate carelessness in the exercise of his paternal authority.
But, imbued from her childhood with a brooding sense of wrong, and an inveterate hatred of a class, opportunity had developed her into a tigress.
In my honeymoon, too, when my most inveterate enemy might relent, one would think, and not envy me a little peace of mind and happiness.