phantasmagoria


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phan·tas·ma·go·ri·a

 (făn-tăz′mə-gôr′ē-ə) also phan·tas·ma·go·ry (făn-tăz′mə-gôr′ē)
n. pl. phan·tas·ma·go·ri·as also phan·tas·ma·go·ries
1.
a. A fantastic sequence of haphazardly associative imagery, as seen in dreams or fever.
b. A constantly changing scene composed of numerous elements.
2. Fantastic imagery as represented in art.

[Alteration of obsolete French phantasmagorie, art of creating supernatural illusions : perhaps fantasme, illusion (from Old French; see phantasm) + allégorie, allegory, allegorical visual representation (from Old French, allegory, from Latin allēgoria; see allegory).]

phan·tas′ma·gor′ic (-gôr′ĭk, -gŏr′-) adj.
phan·tas′ma·gor′i·cal·ly adv.

phantasmagoria

(ˌfæntæzməˈɡɔːrɪə) or

phantasmagory

n
1. psychol a shifting medley of real or imagined figures, as in a dream
2. (Film) films a sequence of pictures made to vary in size rapidly while remaining in focus
3. rare a shifting scene composed of different elements
[C19: probably from French fantasmagorie production of phantasms, from phantasm + -agorie, perhaps from Greek ageirein to gather together]
phantasmagoric, ˌphantasmaˈgorical, ˌphantasmaˈgorial adj
ˌphantasmaˈgorically adv

phan•tas•ma•go•ri•a

(fænˌtæz məˈgɔr i ə, -ˈgoʊr-)

n., pl. -ri•as.
1. a shifting series of phantasms, illusions, or deceptive appearances, as in a dream.
2. a changing scene made up of many elements.
3. an optical illusion produced by a magic lantern or the like in which figures increase or diminish in size, pass into each other, dissolve, etc.
[1795–1805; < French fantasmagorie, compound based on fantasme phantasm; second element perhaps representing Greek agorá assembly, gathering; see -ia]
phan•tas`ma•gor′ic (-ˈgɔr ɪk, -ˈgɒr-) phan•tas`ma•gor′i•cal, adj.
phan•tas`ma•gor′ist, n.

phantasmagoria

a type of magic-lantern show in which rapidly moving images blend, change size, etc.; hence, any series of images that move and change rapidly, as a dream. — phantasmagorial, phantasmagoric, adj.
See also: Dreams
a type of magic-lantern show in which rapidly moving images blend, change size, etc.; hence, any series of images that move and change rapidly, as a dream. — phantasmagorial, phantasmagoric, adj.
See also: Images
a type of magiclantern show in which rapidly moving images blend, change size, etc.; hence, any series of images that move and change rapidly, as a dream. — phantasmagorial, phantasmagoric, adj.
See also: Representation

Phantasmagoria

 a series of phantoms or imagined figures.
Examples: phantasmagoria of contending angels, 1875; of terrible bright colours, 1880; of feathers, spangles, etc., 1822; of figures of ghosts and phantoms; of more prodigal and wild imaginations, 1880; of the sky, 1853.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phantasmagoria - a constantly changing medley of real or imagined images (as in a dream)
internal representation, mental representation, representation - a presentation to the mind in the form of an idea or image

phantasmagoria

noun
An illusion of perceiving something that does not really exist:
Slang: trip.
Translations
Phantasmagorie
fantasmagoria
fantazmagorija
fantasmagoria

phantasmagoria

[ˌfæntæzməˈgɔːrɪə] Nfantasmagoría f

phantasmagoria

nPhantasmagorie f
References in classic literature ?
He had a singular propensity, for example, to hang over Maule's well, and look at the constantly shifting phantasmagoria of figures produced by the agitation of the water over the mosaic-work of colored pebbles at the bottom.
The enormous broad tires of the chariots and the padded feet of the animals brought forth no sound from the moss- covered sea bottom; and so we moved in utter silence, like some huge phantasmagoria, except when the stillness was broken by the guttural growling of a goaded zitidar, or the squealing of fighting thoats.
When the boatman had taken his departure, he remained standing stupidly on the strand, staring straight before him and perceiving objects only through magnifying oscillations which rendered everything a sort of phantasmagoria to him.
As I write this, all the beings and happenings of that other world rise up before me in vast phantasmagoria, and I know that to you they would be rhymeless and reasonless.
Himself a live thing, solid and substantial, possessed of weight and dimension, a reality incontrovertible, he moved through the space and place of being, concrete, hard, quick, convincing, an absoluteness of something surrounded by the shades and shadows of the fluxing phantasmagoria of nothing.
The phantasmagoria of his brain vanished at sight of her.
The world-sickness of the White Logic makes one grin jocosely into the face of the Noseless One and to sneer at all the phantasmagoria of living.
A motley phantasmagoria presents itself before him, which he describes in a few satirical touches, yet without expressing his opinion openly: he tells the people enough to set them all thinking and guessing; but in order to hurt nobody, he wraps his witty oracular judgments in a transparent veil, or rather in a lurid thundercloud, shooting forth bright sparks of wit, that they may fall in the powder-magazine of the expectant audience.
Quilp said not a word in reply, but walking so close to Kit as to bring his eyes within two or three inches of his face, looked fixedly at him, retreated a little distance without averting his gaze, approached again, again withdrew, and so on for half-a-dozen times, like a head in a phantasmagoria.
Today, three years later, different narratives have won over the popular imagination of those residing in the West, hypnotised by the violent phantasmagoria of ISIS videos and sectarian rhetoric.
Here, the band uses its trademark blend of rock, strings and children's instruments to create a dark phantasmagoria that's both intoxicating and hypnotic.