portmanteau


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port·man·teau

 (pôrt-măn′tō, pôrt′măn-tō′)
n. pl. port·man·teaus or port·man·teaux (-tōz, -tōz′)
1. A large leather suitcase that opens into two hinged compartments.
2.
a. A word formed by merging the sounds and meanings of two different words, as chortle, from chuckle and snort. Also called portmanteau word.
b. A word or part of a word that is analyzable as consisting of more than one morpheme without a clear boundary between them, as French du "of the" from de "of" and le "the." Also called portmanteau morph.
adj.
General or generalized: a portmanteau description; portmanteau terms.

[French portemanteau : porte-, from porter, to carry (from Old French; see port5) + manteau, cloak (from Old French mantel, from Latin mantellum). N., senses 2a and b, in reference to Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, in which Humpty Dumpty explains slithy and other made-up words in the poem "Jabberwocky" to Alice as follows: "Slithy" means "lithe and slimy" ... You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.]

portmanteau

(pɔːtˈmæntəʊ)
n, pl -teaus or -teaux (-təʊz)
1. (formerly) a large travelling case made of stiff leather, esp one hinged at the back so as to open out into two compartments
2. (modifier) embodying several uses or qualities: the heroine is a portmanteau figure of all the virtues. Also called: portmantle
[C16: from French: cloak carrier, from porter to carry + manteau cloak, mantle]

port•man•teau

(pɔrtˈmæn toʊ, poʊrt-; ˌpɔrt mænˈtoʊ, ˌpoʊrt-)

n., pl. -teaus, -teaux (-toʊz, -toʊ; -ˈtoʊz, -ˈtoʊ)
adj. n.
1. Chiefly Brit. a case or bag to carry clothing in while traveling, esp. a leather trunk or suitcase that opens into two halves.
adj.
2. combining or blending several items, features, or qualities: a portmanteau show.
[1575–85; < French portemanteau literally, (it) carries (the) cloak; see port5, mantle]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portmanteau - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
motel - a motor hotel
neologism, neology, coinage - a newly invented word or phrase
brunch - combination breakfast and lunch; usually served in late morning
shopaholic - a compulsive shopper; "shopaholics can never resist a bargain"
workaholic - person with a compulsive need to work
smog, smogginess - air pollution by a mixture of smoke and fog
dandle - move (a baby) up and down in one's arms or on one's knees
2.portmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leatherportmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leather
suitcase, traveling bag, travelling bag, grip, bag - a portable rectangular container for carrying clothes; "he carried his small bag onto the plane with him"
Translations
حقيبة سفر
голямкоженкуфар
چمدان
matkalaukku
waliza
va li

portmanteau

[pɔːtˈmæntəʊ]
A. N (portmanteaus, portmanteaux (pl)) [pɔːtˈmæntəʊz]baúl m de viaje
B. CPD portmanteau word Npalabra f combinada

portmanteau

n pl <-s or -x> → Handkoffer m

portmanteau

[ˌpɔːtˈmæntəʊ] nbaule m portabiti
References in classic literature ?
I well remember one morning, as we were on the stand waiting for a fare, that a young man, carrying a heavy portmanteau, trod on a piece of orange peel which lay on the pavement, and fell down with great force.
It was enough that in yonder closet, opposite my dressing-table, garments said to be hers had already displaced my black stuff Lowood frock and straw bonnet: for not to me appertained that suit of wedding raiment; the pearl-coloured robe, the vapoury veil pendent from the usurped portmanteau.
In pursuance of my aunt's kind scheme, I was shortly afterwards fitted out with a handsome purse of money, and a portmanteau, and tenderly dismissed upon my expedition.
After all, I remained up there, repeatedly unlocking and unstrapping my small portmanteau and locking and strapping it up again, until Biddy called to me that I was late.
One of the students carried, wrapped up in a piece of green buckram by way of a portmanteau, what seemed to be a little linen and a couple of pairs of-ribbed stockings; the other carried nothing but a pair of new fencing-foils with buttons.
There was much to be done: his portmanteau to be packed, a credit to be got from the bank where he was a wealthy customer, and certain offices to be transacted for that other bank in which he was an humble clerk; and it chanced, in conformity with human nature, that out of all this business it was the last that came to be neglected.
I sat and pondered awhile, and then some thought occurred to me, and I made search of my portmanteau and in the wardrobe where I had placed my clothes.
Never once did he complain of the length or fatigue of a journey, never make an objection to pack his portmanteau for whatever country it might be, or however far away, whether China or Congo.
A man, too frightened to drop the portmanteau he carried on his shoulder, swung round and sent me staggering with a blow from the corner of his burden.
This doublet and hose, though new, were creased, like traveling clothes for a long time packed in a portmanteau.
Then he turned to the various articles he had left behind him, put the black cravat and blue frock-coat at the bottom of the portmanteau, threw the hat into a dark closet, broke the cane into small bits and flung it in the fire, put on his travelling-cap, and calling his valet, checked with a look the thousand questions he was ready to ask, paid his bill, sprang into his carriage, which was ready, learned at Lyons that Bonaparte had entered Grenoble, and in the midst of the tumult which prevailed along the road, at length reached Marseilles, a prey to all the hopes and fears which enter into the heart of man with ambition and its first successes.
His equipment is a drab great-coat, a hat covered with an oilcloth, top-boots, an umbrella in one hand and a small portmanteau in the other.