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dic·tate

 (dĭk′tāt′, dĭk-tāt′)
v. dic·tat·ed, dic·tat·ing, dic·tates
v.tr.
1. To say or read aloud to be recorded or written by another: dictate a letter.
2.
a. To prescribe with authority; impose: dictated the rules of the game.
b. To control or command: "Foreign leaders were ... dictated by their own circumstances, bound by the universal imperatives of politics" (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
v.intr.
1. To say or read aloud material to be recorded or written by another: dictated for an hour before leaving for the day.
2. To issue orders or commands.
n. (dĭk′tāt′)
1. A directive; a command.
2.
a. An underlying constraint: "These men make numerous decisions affecting how they organize their lives according to the dictates of time and place" (William Marsiglio).
b. A guiding principle: followed the dictates of my conscience.

[Latin dictāre, dictāt-, frequentative of dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

dictate

vb
1. to say (messages, letters, speeches, etc) aloud for mechanical recording or verbatim transcription by another person
2. (tr) to prescribe (commands) authoritatively
3. (intr) to act in a tyrannical manner; seek to impose one's will on others
n
4. an authoritative command
5. a guiding principle or rule: the dictates of reason.
[C17: from Latin dictāre to say repeatedly, order, from dīcere to say]

dic•tate

(v. ˈdɪk teɪt, dɪkˈteɪt; n. ˈdɪk teɪt)

v. -tat•ed, -tat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to say or read aloud for a person to transcribe or for a machine to record.
2. to prescribe authoritatively; command unconditionally: to dictate peace terms to the enemy.
v.i.
3. to say or read aloud for transcription.
4. to give orders.
n.
5. an authoritative order or command.
6. a guiding principle: the dictates of conscience.
[1585–95; < Latin dictātus, past participle of dictāre to say repeatedly]

dictate


Past participle: dictated
Gerund: dictating

Imperative
dictate
dictate
Present
I dictate
you dictate
he/she/it dictates
we dictate
you dictate
they dictate
Preterite
I dictated
you dictated
he/she/it dictated
we dictated
you dictated
they dictated
Present Continuous
I am dictating
you are dictating
he/she/it is dictating
we are dictating
you are dictating
they are dictating
Present Perfect
I have dictated
you have dictated
he/she/it has dictated
we have dictated
you have dictated
they have dictated
Past Continuous
I was dictating
you were dictating
he/she/it was dictating
we were dictating
you were dictating
they were dictating
Past Perfect
I had dictated
you had dictated
he/she/it had dictated
we had dictated
you had dictated
they had dictated
Future
I will dictate
you will dictate
he/she/it will dictate
we will dictate
you will dictate
they will dictate
Future Perfect
I will have dictated
you will have dictated
he/she/it will have dictated
we will have dictated
you will have dictated
they will have dictated
Future Continuous
I will be dictating
you will be dictating
he/she/it will be dictating
we will be dictating
you will be dictating
they will be dictating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dictating
you have been dictating
he/she/it has been dictating
we have been dictating
you have been dictating
they have been dictating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dictating
you will have been dictating
he/she/it will have been dictating
we will have been dictating
you will have been dictating
they will have been dictating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dictating
you had been dictating
he/she/it had been dictating
we had been dictating
you had been dictating
they had been dictating
Conditional
I would dictate
you would dictate
he/she/it would dictate
we would dictate
you would dictate
they would dictate
Past Conditional
I would have dictated
you would have dictated
he/she/it would have dictated
we would have dictated
you would have dictated
they would have dictated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dictate - an authoritative ruledictate - an authoritative rule    
prescript, rule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
2.dictate - a guiding principle; "the dictates of reason"
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
Verb1.dictate - issue commands or orders for
inflict, impose, bring down, visit - impose something unpleasant; "The principal visited his rage on the students"
mandate - make mandatory; "the new director of the school board mandated regular tests"
2.dictate - say out loud for the purpose of recording; "He dictated a report to his secretary"
read - look at, interpret, and say out loud something that is written or printed; "The King will read the proclamation at noon"
3.dictate - rule as a dictator
rule, govern - exercise authority over; as of nations; "Who is governing the country now?"
grind down, tyrannise, tyrannize - rule a country as a tyrant

dictate

verb
1. speak, say, utter, read out, read aloud, say aloud He dictates his novels to his secretary.
2. determine, demand, command, establish, prescribe, pronounce, decree, ordain Circumstances dictated that they played a defensive game.
noun
1. command, order, decree, word, demand, direction, requirement, bidding, mandate, injunction, statute, fiat, ultimatum, ordinance, edict, behest They must abide by the dictates of the new government.
2. principle, law, rule, standard, code, criterion, ethic, canon, maxim, dictum, precept, axiom, moral law We have followed the dictates of our consciences.
dictate to someone order (about), direct, dominate, bully, walk (all) over, bulldoze, pressurize, lay down the law, browbeat, give orders to, lord it over, pronounce to, domineer What gives them the right to dictate to us?

dictate

verb
1. To set forth expressly and authoritatively:
2. To command or issue commands in an arrogant manner:
noun
1. An authoritative indication to be obeyed:
2. A code or set of codes governing action or procedure, for example:
Translations
يَأْمُر، يُمْلي أوامِرَهُيُمْلي شُروطَهيُمْلي عَلى
diktovatpředpisovatpřikazovat
diktere
sanella
diktáltollba mond
gefa fyrirmælimæla fyrir umstíla; lesa fyrir
diktantasdiktatoriaus valdoma valstybėdiktatoriusdiktatūradiktuoti
diktētpavēlēt
diktovať
narekovatiukazovati
buyurmakdikte et mekemretmekileri sürmekyazdırmak

dictate

A. [dɪkˈteɪt] VT
1. (to secretary) [+ letter] → dictar
2. (= order) → mandar; [+ terms, conditions] → imponer
he decided to act as circumstances dictateddecidió actuar según (mandasen) las circunstancias
B. [dɪkˈteɪt] VIdictar
to dictate to one's secretarydictar a su secretaria
C. [ˈdɪkteɪt] Nmandato m dictatesdictados mpl
the dictates of conscience/reasonlos dictados de la conciencia/razón
dictate to VI + PREP [+ person] → dar órdenes a
I won't be dictated toa mi nadie me da órdenes

dictate

[dɪkˈteɪt]
vt
[+ words, letter] → dicter
(= lay down) [+ condition] → dicter, imposer
common sense dictates that ... → le bon sens dicte que ...
(= govern) → dicter
to be dictated by convention → être imposé(e) par les conventions
vi
to dictate to sb [+ person] → imposer sa volonté à qn, régenter qn
to attempt to dictate to sb → vouloir imposer sa volonté à qn
I won't be dictated to
BUT Je n'ai d'ordres à recevoir de personne.
[ˈdɪkteɪt] n (= order) → injonction f
to obey sb's dictates → obéir aux injonctions de qn
the dictates of one's conscience → la voix de sa conscience

dictate

vtdiktieren; reason/common sense dictates that …die Vernunft/der gesunde Menschenverstand sagt uns, dass …
vidiktieren
n usu plDiktat nt; (of reason)Gebote pl

dictate

[vb dɪkˈteɪt; n ˈdɪkteɪt]
1. vt & vi (all senses) → dettare
he decided to act as circumstances dictated → decise di agire come gli dettavano le circostanze
2. dictates npl (of heart, fashion) → dettami mpl
dictate to vi + prep (person) → dare ordini a, dettar legge a
I won't be dictated to → non ricevo ordini

dictate

(dikˈteit) , ((American) ˈdikteit) verb
1. to say or read out (something) for someone else to write down. He always dictates his letters (to his secretary).
2. to state officially or with authority. He dictated the terms of our offer.
3. to give orders to; to command. I certainly won't be dictated to by you (= I won't do as you say).
dicˈtation noun
something read for another to write down. The secretary is taking dictation.
dicˈtator noun
an all-powerful ruler. As soon as he became dictator, he made all political parties illegal and governed the country as he liked.
dicˈtatorship noun
1. the authority of a dictator. His dictatorship is threatened by the terrorists.
2. a state ruled by a dictator. That country is a dictatorship now.

dictate

v. dictar, ordenar.
References in classic literature ?
The effort of dictating seems to be beyond my power this evening.
The next morning, dictating, he concluded that he liked the way she did her hair, though for the life of him he could have given no description of it.
If you remember,'" said Carton, dictating, "`the words that passed between us, long ago, you will readily comprehend this when you see it.
Jellyby, putting a number of papers towards us, "to look over some remarks on that head, and on the general subject, which have been extensively circulated, while I finish a letter I am now dictating to my eldest daughter, who is my amanuensis--"
Jellyby, dictating, "'to inform him, in reference to his letter of inquiry on the African project--' No, Peepy
Sharifs dictating judegments against SMBB (Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto and AZ (Asif Zardari), blackmailing judges is justice while Panama decision based on international scandal is called conspiracy,' he tweeted.
We definitely need to improve on dictating and controlling games because in the first two games we certainly haven't been the best two sides.
Global Banking News-December 24, 2013--McKinsey not dictating BoE strategy, says Hogg
London, July 6(ANI): Former West Indies fast bowler Michael Holding has criticized the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) for having too much power in world cricket and dictating to the International Cricket Council (ICC).
In fact, more than 70,000 healthcare providers are now using it for dictation, from creating case notes to dictating reports.
In 1897, suffering from writer's cramp, Henry James (1843-1916) began dictating to a typist.