didact


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di·dact

 (dī′dăkt′)
n.
A didactic person.

[Back-formation from didactic.]

didact

(ˈdaɪdækt)
n
1. (Education) a person who is didactic
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who produces didactic literature or other work

di•dact

(ˈdaɪ dækt)

n.
a didactic person.
[1950–55; probably back formation from didactic; compare autodidact]
References in periodicals archive ?
com/halo-5-guardians-comic-reveals-how-master-chiefs-helmet-got-cracked) Gamingbolt , the reason for the crack is Master Chief's face-off with the Didact.
In Pavsek's account, Godard's deep-seated cultural pessimism functions as a "stand-in of sorts for Adorno," while Tahimik's work appears as that of a "Brechtian didact.
The Crop Protection department (CPD) has reported no major disease in mango clusters except some common diseases such as powdery mildew, emflorance, and didact which are controlled through proper insect sprays.
One can perceive, as well, another skill in the background--the declarative voice of a natural didact and patriarch.
Rennes: PUR, Collection Didact Psychologie Sociale.
Shaw's reputation as a social reformer and didact made him a natural target for Huxley, and the details of the scene are drawn from a web of associations linking Shaw to cinema history.
In his musical career, if not in other parts of his post-Beatles life, Harrison turned from a seeker who brought new sounds and ideas to his audience to a didact quick to dismiss both indifferent listeners and newer artists.
The tonal paradox of didact and seer is caught in her final chapter, which acknowledges 'Calvino's ability to seduce even those who are aware of the [.
Under such tutelage, Kaplan becomes an incorrigible didact, turning
At home, for all his award winning, he remains a bowl-sized lump in the literary oatmeal, an earnest didact at odds with both the modernist tradition and the gospel of human progress.
Where Fish's Milton is a tedious didact "repeatedly provoking and then squelching readers' evil responses" (28), Rumrich's Milton celebrates the "chaotic potency" (28) of psychic and spiritual life.