didactic


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Related to didactic: Didactic literature

di·dac·tic

 (dī-dăk′tĭk) also di·dac·ti·cal (-tĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Intended to instruct.
2. Morally instructive.
3. Inclined to teach or moralize excessively.

[Greek didaktikos, skillful in teaching, from didaktos, taught, from didaskein, didak-, to teach, educate.]

di·dac′ti·cal·ly adv.
di·dac′ti·cism (-tĭ-sĭz′əm) n.

didactic

(dɪˈdæktɪk) or

didactical

adj
1. (Education) intended to instruct, esp excessively
2. (Education) morally instructive; improving
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (of works of art or literature) containing a political or moral message to which aesthetic considerations are subordinated
[C17: from Greek didaktikos skilled in teaching, from didaskein to teach]
diˈdactically adv
diˈdacticism n

di•dac•tic

(daɪˈdæk tɪk)

also di•dac′ti•cal,



adj.
1. intended for instruction; instructive: didactic poetry.
2. overinclined to teach or lecture others.
3. teaching or intending to teach a moral lesson.
4. didactics, (used with a sing. v.) the art or science of teaching.
[1635–45; < Greek didaktikós apt at teaching, instructive =didakt(ós) that may be taught + -ikos -ic]
di•dac′ti•cal•ly, adv.
di•dac′ti•cism, n.

didactic

Intended or inclining to teach or instruct people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.didactic - instructive (especially excessively)
instructive, informative - serving to instruct or enlighten or inform

didactic

adjective
1. instructive, educational, enlightening, moral, edifying, homiletic, preceptive In totalitarian societies, art exists solely for didactic purposes.
2. pedantic, academic, formal, pompous, schoolmasterly, erudite, bookish, abstruse, moralizing, priggish, pedagogic He adopts a lofty, didactic tone when addressing women.

didactic

adjective
1. Teaching morality:
2. Inclined to teach or moralize excessively:
Translations
didaktički

didactic

[daɪˈdæktɪk] ADJ (= educational) → didáctico; (= moralistic) [tone] → moralizador

didactic

[daɪˈdæktɪk] adjdidactique

didactic

adjdidaktisch

didactic

[dɪˈdæktɪk] adj (frm) (educational) → didattico/a (pej) (person) → pedante

di·dac·tic

a. didáctico-a, instructivo-a, que se enseña por medio de libros de texto y conferencias a diferencia de un planteamiento clínico.
References in classic literature ?
She sent this didactic gem to several markets, but it found no purchaser, and she was inclined to agree with Mr.
The British Constitution was to Montesquieu what Homer has been to the didactic writers on epic poetry.
The question is this: Monsieur the Principal thinks that my thesis ought to be dogmatic and didactic.
said Hetty, letting her arms fall and looking rather bewildered, but suspecting that her aunt was as usual exaggerating with a didactic purpose.
The principal difficulty in your case," remarked Holmes, in his didactic fashion, "lay in the fact of there being too much evidence.
It is so intensely and deliberately didactic, and its subject is esteemed so dry, that I delight in throwing it at the heads of the wiseacres who repeat the parrot cry that art should never be didactic.
The shallowness of a waternixie's soul may have a charm until she becomes didactic.
His didactic stories, like all stories of the sort, dwindle into allegories; perhaps they do their work the better for this, with the simple intelligences they address; but I think that where Tolstoy becomes impatient of his office of artist, and prefers to be directly a teacher, he robs himself of more than half his strength with those he can move only through the realization of themselves in others.
Granting the continuity of life," said he, in his most didactic manner, "none of us can predicate what opportunities of observation one may have from what we may call the spirit plane to the plane of matter.
The Hesiodic poems fall into two groups according as they are didactic (technical or gnomic) or genealogical: the first group centres round the "Works and Days", the second round the "Theogony".
More than once during the years that I had lived with him in Baker Street I had observed that a small vanity underlay my companion's quiet and didactic manner.
He lost his way in long passages for some six or eight minutes: till he heard the high-pitched, didactic voice of the doctor, and then the dull voice of the priest, followed by general laughter.