dido

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Di·do

 (dī′dō)
n. Roman Mythology
The founder and queen of Carthage, who fell in love with Aeneas and killed herself when he abandoned her.

di·do

 (dī′dō)
n. pl. di·dos or di·does
A mischievous prank or antic; a caper.

[Origin unknown.]

dido

(ˈdaɪdəʊ)
n (usually plural) , pl -dos or -does
an antic; prank; trick
[C19: originally US: of uncertain origin]

Dido

(ˈdaɪdəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a princess of Tyre who founded Carthage and became its queen. Virgil tells of her suicide when abandoned by her lover Aeneas

di•do

(ˈdaɪ doʊ)

n., pl. -dos, -does. Usu., didos, didoes.
1. a mischievous trick; prank; antic.
2. a bauble or trifle.
[1800–10; orig. uncertain]

Di•do

(ˈdaɪ doʊ)

n.
a legendary queen of Carthage who killed herself when abandoned by Aeneas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dido - (Roman mythology) a princess of Tyre who was the founder and queen of CarthageDido - (Roman mythology) a princess of Tyre who was the founder and queen of Carthage; Virgil tells of her suicide when she was abandoned by Aeneas
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans
Translations

Dido

[daɪdəʊ] NDido

Dido

[ˈdaɪdəʊ] n (Myth) → Didone f
References in periodicals archive ?
Studieed the extensive use of images and themes from the Aeneid in the play and have shown especially how the love of Ferdinand and Miranda is partly parallel to, and partly a reversal of, the ancient love story of Aeneas and the queen of Carthage, there may be another motive for Didos inclusion, a motive related to a system of wordplay involving shuffled repetitions of the sounds of letters and syllables.
Retellings and invocations of Didos story in Renaissance drama are characterized by a language of seeing, burning, and dying, relating both to Dido's supposed view of Aeneas sailing away from her and Aeneas's view of her pyre as he further recedes.
Didos "I doe eye" plays upon her name; other instances include the palindrome "O Dido" (2.
Nevertheless, his weakness is shameful, and his position as Dido's "pet" is reinforced by his consent to be paraded "as Didos husband through the Punicke streets" (4.
Christopher Marlowe's Dido, Queene of Carthage is an obscure, early work that no one seems to pay much attention to except Marlowe scholars, who prefer to occasionally study what makes Marlowe's first attempt at writing for the stage a very bad play, a reputation it thoroughly deserves.
It should also be mentioned that Marlowe's play was premiered by a children's company, (2) and the notion of a little boy Dido pleading with a little boy Aeneas, (3) on top of Marlowe's comic script must have made for hilarious viewing.
So there will be two Didos in this version, one sung by soprano Wendy Nieper, the other danced by Birmingham Kathak star Sonia Sabri.
When Paul Herbert first saw MAC's open-air Arena theatre in the 1960s, he thought it would be a great space in which to produce Purcell's opera Dido and Aeneas.
Dido and Aeneas is generally regarded as Britain's first operatic masterpiece, yet its dimensions and origins are both modest, playing for only about an hour.
1156) through to Gavin Douglas's early sixteenth century Eneados (1513), stopping in between at the Didos read by Chretien in Erec et Enide, by the anonymous author or the Histoire ancienne, by Chaucer in The House of Fame and The Legend of Good Women and by Caxton in his Eneydos.
Marilynn Desmond's reading of the medieval Dido is a troubling one, and it strives to be so.
The counter-memory of this shadowy, other Dido persists throughout the Middle Ages (it is present, for instance, in Servius' commentary on the Aeneid) and, as Desmond demonstrates, repeatedly undermines the authority of Virgil's colonized and wanton Dido.