die down


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

die 1

 (dī)
intr.v. died, dy·ing (dī′ĭng), dies
1. To stop living; become dead; expire: plants that died in the first frost of the season.
2. To cease existing, often gradually; fade: The sunlight died in the west.
3. To experience an intense, seemingly unbearable reaction to something: nearly died of embarrassment.
4. Informal To want something very much. Usually used in the progressive aspect: I am dying for a box of chocolates. She was dying to see the exhibit.
5. To stop working or operating: The motor died when we ran out of gas.
6. To become indifferent: had died to all worldly concerns.
Phrasal Verbs:
die back Botany
To be affected by dieback.
die down
To lose strength; subside: The winds died down.
die off
To undergo a sudden, sharp decline in population: hypothesized that pesticides were causing bees to die off across the country.
die out
To cease living or existing completely; become extinct: a theory that explains how the dinosaurs died out; customs that died out with the advent of technology.
Idioms:
die hard
1. To take a long time in passing out of existence: racial prejudices that die hard.
2. To resist against overwhelming, hopeless odds: radicalism that dies hard.
die on the vine
To fail, as from lack of support, especially at an early stage: a plan that died on the vine.
to die for Informal
Remarkable or highly desirable.

[Middle English dien, probably from Old Norse deyja; see dheu- in Indo-European roots.]

die 2

(dī)
n.
1. pl. dice (dīs)
a. A small cube marked on each side with from one to six dots, usually used in pairs in gambling and in various other games.
b. dice (used with a sing. verb) A game of chance using dice.
2. pl. dies A device used for cutting out, forming, or stamping material, especially:
a. An engraved metal piece used for impressing a design onto a softer metal, as in coining money.
b. One of several component pieces that are fitted into a diestock to cut threads on screws or bolts.
c. A part on a machine that punches shaped holes in, cuts, or forms sheet metal, cardboard, or other stock.
d. A metal block containing small conical holes through which plastic, metal, or other ductile material is extruded or drawn.
3. pl. dies Architecture The dado of a pedestal, especially when cube-shaped.
tr.v. died, die·ing, dies
To cut, form, or stamp with or as if with a die.
Idioms:
load the dice
1. To make an outcome highly probable; predetermine a result: "These factors merely load the dice, upping the odds that a household will fall into a certain ... income distribution" (Thomas G. Exter).
2. To put another at a distinct disadvantage, as through prior maneuver: The dice were loaded against the defendant before the trial.
no dice
1. Of no use; futile.
2. Used as a refusal to a request.
the die is cast
The decision has been made and is irrevocable.

[Middle English de, gaming die, from Old French, possibly from Latin datum, given (as by fortune in the roll of the dice), neuter of datus, past participle of dare, to give; see dō- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

die down

vb (intr, adverb)
1. (Horticulture) (of some perennial plants) to wither and die above ground, leaving only the root alive during the winter
2. to lose strength or power, esp by degrees
3. to become calm or quiet
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.die down - suffer from a disease that kills shoots; "The plants near the garage are dying back"
shrink, shrivel, shrivel up, wither - wither, as with a loss of moisture; "The fruit dried and shriveled"
2.die down - become progressively weaker; "the laughter died down"
weaken - become weaker; "The prisoner's resistance weakened after seven days"
Translations
يَخْمِدُ، يَخْفِتُ، يَهْدَأ
utichatztlumit se
dø henstilne af
deyja út, dvína
dinmekhafiflemek

w>die down

vinachlassen; (fire)herunterbrennen; (flames)kleiner werden; (storm, wind)sich legen, nachlassen; (noise)leiser werden, schwächer werden; (emotion also)sich legen; (quarrel, protest)nachlassen, schwächer werden

die1

(dai) present participle dying (ˈdaiiŋ) : past tense, past participle died verb
1. to lose life; to stop living and become dead. Those flowers are dying; She died of old age.
2. to fade; to disappear. The daylight was dying fast.
3. to have a strong desire (for something or to do something). I'm dying for a drink; I'm dying to see her.
diehard noun
a person who resists new ideas.
die away
to fade from sight or hearing. The sound died away into the distance.
die down
to lose strength or power. I think the wind has died down a bit.
die hard
to take a long time to disappear. Old habits die hard.
die off
to die quickly or in large numbers. Herds of cattle were dying off because of the drought.
die out
to cease to exist anywhere. The custom died out during the last century.
References in classic literature ?
He had planted a great many potatoes, and his potatoes, as Levin had seen driving past, were already past flowering and beginning to die down, while Levin's were only just coming into flower.
The influence that had passed into Clare like an excitation from the sky did not die down.
Think of the ships at sea--how they will steam on and on, until the furnaces die down or until they run full tilt upon some beach.
I haven't examined half a dozen hands in the last half dozen years; you see, the people got to joking about it, and I stopped to let the talk die down.
With gusts of up to 100kmh since Friday, forecasters said they'd die down this week.
We pot them up for the winter, let the foliage die down and keep them dry until the next spring, when a gentle watering helps them spring back into life.