die off


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Related to die off: die out

die 1

 (dī)
intr.v. died, dy·ing (dī′ĭng), dies
1. To stop living; become dead; expire: plants that died in the first frost of the season.
2. To cease existing, often gradually; fade: The sunlight died in the west.
3. To experience an intense, seemingly unbearable reaction to something: nearly died of embarrassment.
4. Informal To want something very much. Usually used in the progressive aspect: I am dying for a box of chocolates. She was dying to see the exhibit.
5. To stop working or operating: The motor died when we ran out of gas.
6. To become indifferent: had died to all worldly concerns.
Phrasal Verbs:
die back Botany
To be affected by dieback.
die down
To lose strength; subside: The winds died down.
die off
To undergo a sudden, sharp decline in population: hypothesized that pesticides were causing bees to die off across the country.
die out
To cease living or existing completely; become extinct: a theory that explains how the dinosaurs died out; customs that died out with the advent of technology.
Idioms:
die hard
1. To take a long time in passing out of existence: racial prejudices that die hard.
2. To resist against overwhelming, hopeless odds: radicalism that dies hard.
die on the vine
To fail, as from lack of support, especially at an early stage: a plan that died on the vine.
to die for Informal
Remarkable or highly desirable.

[Middle English dien, probably from Old Norse deyja; see dheu- in Indo-European roots.]

die 2

 (dī)
n.
1. pl. dice (dīs)
a. A small cube marked on each side with from one to six dots, usually used in pairs in gambling and in various other games.
b. dice(used with a sing. verb) A game of chance using dice.
2. pl. dies A device used for cutting out, forming, or stamping material, especially:
a. An engraved metal piece used for impressing a design onto a softer metal, as in coining money.
b. One of several component pieces that are fitted into a diestock to cut threads on screws or bolts.
c. A part on a machine that punches shaped holes in, cuts, or forms sheet metal, cardboard, or other stock.
d. A metal block containing small conical holes through which plastic, metal, or other ductile material is extruded or drawn.
3. pl. dies Architecture The dado of a pedestal, especially when cube-shaped.
tr.v. died, die·ing, dies
To cut, form, or stamp with or as if with a die.
Idioms:
load the dice
1. To make an outcome highly probable; predetermine a result: "These factors merely load the dice, upping the odds that a household will fall into a certain ... income distribution" (Thomas G. Exter).
2. To put another at a distinct disadvantage, as through prior maneuver: The dice were loaded against the defendant before the trial.
no dice
1. Of no use; futile.
2. Used as a refusal to a request.
the die is cast
The decision has been made and is irrevocable.

[Middle English de, gaming die, from Old French, from Latin datum, given, from neuter past participle of dare, to give; see dō- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.die off - become extinct; "Dinosaurs died out"
disappear, vanish, go away - get lost, as without warning or explanation; "He disappeared without a trace"
Translations
يَموت واحِدا بَعْدَ الآخَر
vymírat
dø en efter en
elhull
vymierať
birer birer ölmek

w>die off

vi(hin)wegsterben; (animals, people also)(der Reihe nach) sterben

die1

(dai) present participle dying (ˈdaiiŋ) : past tense, past participle died verb
1. to lose life; to stop living and become dead. Those flowers are dying; She died of old age.
2. to fade; to disappear. The daylight was dying fast.
3. to have a strong desire (for something or to do something). I'm dying for a drink; I'm dying to see her.
diehard noun
a person who resists new ideas.
die away
to fade from sight or hearing. The sound died away into the distance.
die down
to lose strength or power. I think the wind has died down a bit.
die hard
to take a long time to disappear. Old habits die hard.
die off
to die quickly or in large numbers. Herds of cattle were dying off because of the drought.
die out
to cease to exist anywhere. The custom died out during the last century.
References in classic literature ?
When particularly exasperated against them (which, scandal said, was when Sim Tappertit slighted her most) she was accustomed to wish with great emphasis that the whole race of women could but die off, in order that the men might be brought to know the real value of the blessings by which they set so little store; nay, her feeling for her order ran so high, that she sometimes declared, if she could only have good security for a fair, round number--say ten thousand--of young virgins following her example, she would, to spite mankind, hang, drown, stab, or poison herself, with a joy past all expression.
There are fourteen water-mills, six steam-engines, and a galvanic battery, always a-working upon it, and they can't make it fast enough, though the men work so hard that they die off, and the widows is pensioned directly, with twenty pound a-year for each of the children, and a premium of fifty for twins.
No one was then thinking of the king, who, leaning on his elbow at his window, had sadly seen pass away all that light, and heard that noise die off -- no, not one, if it was not that unknown of the hostelry des Medici, whom we have seen go out, enveloped in his cloak.
Mowgli heard it rumble, and rise, and fall, and die off in a creepy sort of whine behind him, and laughed to himself as he ran through the Jungle.
It is likely that sudden variation in the weather at the time of each die off may have played a role and this might also implicate climate change as an underlying factor although it is too early to confirm this.