diegesis

(redirected from diegeses)

di·e·ge·sis

 (dī′ə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. di·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
1. The presentation of a narrative without direct dramatic imitation of the events, scenes, or characters described.
2. The world that is depicted in a work of narrative art, especially a film.

[Greek diēgēsis, narration, narrative, from diēgeisthai, to describe : dia-, dia- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

diegesis

(ˌdaɪiːˈdʒiːsɪs)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in narrative film or literature) the fictional setting, events, and characters

diegesis

- The narrative or plot.
See also related terms for narrative.
Translations
diégèse
diegese
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, he turns to cinematic noir diegeses as pre-made test cases for exploring limited action.
She then elaborates on this definition while providing context for the author's life and the "objects and architectures" that constitute his narrative diegeses.
The general hypothesis used here to analyze temporal transitions in Burkinabe novels is that there is an alternation, or even a telescoping between two types of diegeses (autonomous and linked), between the two tense sub-systems of the French verbal system.
In French, these two diegeses correspond to the PP-SP opposition because, as Benveniste (1966: 244) expansively observes: "The temporal benchmark of the perfect [PP] is the moment of the discourse, whereas the benchmark of the indeterminate past [SP] is the moment of the event" (Adam, Lugrin and Revaz 1998: 90).
This to and fro phenomenon between two types of diegeses obtains in SP and P1 novels as well as in P1, SP and/or PP ones.
In Champ d'aout there is a true and impressive regular telescoping between the two types of diegeses.
Despite Jensson's dismissal of narratology, his description of the narrative mode is consistent with Genette's, which was itself based on Plato's analysis of narrative in the Republic (3:392c-395), where Socrates distinguished mimesis (drama) from simple and mixed diegeses.
While Warren Buckland concedes that there are precursors for the plot twists, blurred realities and diegeses, unreliable narration and visuals, nonlinear and looped chronologies, and labyrinthine nesting narratives of contemporary puzzle films, he asserts that we are in the midst of a "new storytelling epoch" characterized by dynamic cinematic storytelling that pushes the bounds of narrative, more often than not opting for a visual and narrative complexity that cannot be "subsumed under classical conceptions of mimesis, probability, or necessity" (5).
Through the lens of Hegelian and Lacanian theory, McGowan makes a case for fantasy functioning as the "reality-support" of Lynch's diegeses and, by extension, the diegesis of viewers.
At the same time, it is essential to remember that Deja Vu's invention of ontologically separable diegeses occurs within an "action hack" cinema that remains every bit as critically disparaged in our time as was Hitchcock's in his, or as was the medium itself in the time of the "rube.