dietary law


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dietary law

n. Judaism
The body of regulations prescribing the kinds and combinations of food that may be eaten.

di′etary law`


n.
Judaism. any of the laws dealing with permitted foods, food preparation and combinations, and the utensils and dishes coming into contact with food. Compare kashruth.
[1925–30]
References in periodicals archive ?
The company voluntarily sought halal certification to guarantee its food industry customers that their conveyor belts - an integral part food processing were compliant with Islamic dietary law.
Approved 'Wet' lubes will now be carrying a 'K' to show that they meet the standards of Jewish dietary law, which is known as 'kashrut' that prohibits consumption of certain animals and requires ritual slaughter of those that are deemed edible.
Kosher refers to food that conform to the regulations of kashrut or Jewish dietary law.
McDonald's has agreed to pay $700,000 to members of the Muslim community to settle allegations that a Detroit restaurant falsely advertised its food as being prepared according to Islamic dietary law.
is in hot water over its food, but the problem this time isn't calorie counts--it's the restaurant's alleged failure to comply with Muslim dietary law, despite its advertising to the contrary.
Chicken, beef and other animals must be slaughtered by a butcher trained in Jewish dietary law.
Social enterprise Enta, which helps unemployed youths find work, has set up an innovative catering service to tap into the growing demand for food complying with Islamic dietary law.
The kosher kitchen means all catering will conform to Jewish dietary law.
Halal certifiers are comprised of scientific and religious experts in Halal that are dedicated to upholding the integrity of the Halal status of foods in accordance with the highest standards of Islamic dietary law.
Consumers following kosher dietary law should be aware that soft gelatin capsules containing fish oils are made of non-kosher animal gelatin.
American Judaism, unlike European and Middle Eastern Judaism, is divided into three broad groups--Orthodox or traditional congregations, Reform or liberal congregations that have largely set aside many old traditions like Jewish dietary law and the wearing of the yarmulke, and Conservative congregations that might be described as middle-of-the-road.