differently


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dif·fer·ent

 (dĭf′ər-ənt, dĭf′rənt)
adj.
1. Unlike in form, quality, amount, or nature; dissimilar: took different approaches to the problem.
2. Distinct or separate: That's a different issue altogether.
3. Various or assorted: interviewed different members of the community.
4. Differing from all others; unusual: a different point of view.
adv.
In a different way or manner; otherwise: "Carol ... didn't know different until Elinor told her" (Ben Brantley).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin differēns, different-, present participle of differre, to differ; see differ.]

dif′fer·ent·ly adv.
dif′fer·ent·ness n.
Usage Note: The phrases different from and different than are both common in British and American English. The British also use the construction different to. Since the 18th century, language critics have singled out different than as incorrect when used before nouns and noun phrases, though it is well attested in the works of reputable writers. Traditionally, from is used when the comparison is between two persons or things: My book is different from [not than] yours. Note that noun phrases, including ones that have clauses in them, also fall into this category: The campus is different from the way it was the last time you were here. The Usage Panel is divided on the acceptability of different than with nouns and noun phrases, with a majority finding several of these constructions unacceptable. In our 2004 survey, 57 percent rejected the use of different than with a gerund in the sentence Caring for children with disabilities in a regular child-care setting is not new and, in many cases, is not particularly different than caring for other children. Roughly the same percentage (55) disapproved of the construction with a noun phrase containing a clause in The new kid felt that the coach's treatment of him was different than that of the other players who were on the team last year. Some 60 percent rejected the sentence New York seemed very different than Rome, where they'd been on good terms. There should be no complaint, however, when the object of comparison is expressed by a full clause: The campus is different than it was twenty years ago.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.differently - in another and different manner; "very soon you will know differently"; "she thought otherwise"; "there is no way out other than the fire escape";

differently

adverb dissimilarly, otherwise, in another way, in contrary fashion He thinks differently from normal people.
dissimilarly similarly, in the same way, likewise, comparably, in like manner
Translations
drugače

differently

[ˈdɪfrəntlɪ] ADVde modo distinto
she wanted to do things differentlyquería hacer las cosas de otro modo or de modo distinto

differently

[ˈdɪfrəntli] adv [behave, feel, treat, react] → différemment
to think differently (= have a different opinion) → penser différemment

differently

advanders (from als); (from one another) → unterschiedlich; I was never treated differently from the menich wurde nie anders als die Männer behandelt; we all react differently to stresswir reagieren alle anders or unterschiedlich auf Stress; differently priced seating areasunterschiedlich teure Sitzbereiche; differently priced booksBücher mit unterschiedlichen Preisen

differently

[ˈdɪfrntlɪ] advin modo diverso or differente
she thinks quite differently now → la pensa diversamente adesso
References in classic literature ?
If they have my map they would act differently, I should think.
While his auditors received a cheering assurance of the security of their place of concealment from this untutored description of Glenn's,* they were much inclined to judge differently from Hawkeye, of its wild beauties.
The mode of his death, too, affects the mind differently, in our day, from what it did a century and a half ago.
Jukniene-- she valued them differently, for she had a feeling that she was getting something for nothing by means of them--that with them she was getting the better of a world that was getting the better of her in so many other ways.
I know that most men think differently from myself; but those whose lives are by profession devoted to the study of these or kindred subjects content me as little as any.
Still, this is only my opinion, and I am only one man; others, with less experience, may think differently.
Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter's marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing for herself as for them, and would have been a great deal happier if she had spent all the rest of her life at Hartfield.
If, however, by an unforeseen chance it should be in my power to serve him farther, I must think very differently of him from what I now do, if I am not as ready to be useful to him then as I sincerely wish I could be at present.
Fairfax found you to train it; but now you know that it is the illegitimate offspring of a French opera- girl, you will perhaps think differently of your post and protegee: you will be coming to me some day with notice that you have found another place--that you beg me to look out for a new governess, &c.
As he had treated me at school differently from all the rest, I joyfully believed that he treated me in life unlike any other friend he had.
Indeed, I was not only so changed in the course of nature, but so differently dressed and so differently circumstanced, that it was not at all likely he could have known me without accidental help.
That is how I thought then, my father; now I think differently.