diffident


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Related to diffident: enfranchise

dif·fi·dent

 (dĭf′ĭ-dənt, -dĕnt′)
adj.
Lacking or marked by a lack of self-confidence; shy and timid: He was too diffident to express his opinion.

[Middle English, from Latin diffīdēns, diffīdent-, present participle of diffīdere, to mistrust : dis-, dis- + fīdere, to trust; see bheidh- in Indo-European roots.]

dif′fi·dent·ly adv.

diffident

(ˈdɪfɪdənt)
adj
lacking self-confidence; timid; shy
[C15: from Latin diffīdere to distrust, from dis- not + fīdere to trust]
ˈdiffidence n
ˈdiffidently adv

dif•fi•dent

(ˈdɪf ɪ dənt)

adj.
1. lacking confidence in one's own ability, worth, or fitness; timid; shy.
2. hesitant or tentative in manner; reserved.
3. Archaic. distrustful.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin diffīdent-, s. of diffīdēns, present participle of diffīdere to lack confidence =dif- dif- + fīdere to trust (see faith)]
dif′fi•dence, n.
dif′fi•dent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.diffident - showing modest reserve; "she was diffident when offering a comment on the professor's lecture"
reserved - marked by self-restraint and reticence; "was habitually reserved in speech, withholding her opinion"-Victoria Sackville-West
2.diffident - lacking self-confidencediffident - lacking self-confidence; "stood in the doorway diffident and abashed"; "problems that call for bold not timid responses"; "a very unsure young man"
confident - having or marked by confidence or assurance; "a confident speaker"; "a confident reply"; "his manner is more confident these days"; "confident of fulfillment"

diffident

diffident

adjective
Not forward but reticent or reserved in manner:
Translations
عَديم الثِّقَه بِنَفْسِهِ
bázlivýnesmělý
skyusikker
óframfærinn
nepasitikėjimas saviminepasitikintis saviminetvirtai
biklsnedrošs

diffident

[ˈdɪfɪdənt] ADJinseguro, cohibido

diffident

[ˈdɪfɪdənt] adjqui manque d'assurance, peu sûr(e) de soi
to be diffident → manquer d'assurance, être peu sûr(e) de soi

diffident

adjzurückhaltend, bescheiden; smilezaghaft; he was diffident about offering his helper hat zaghaft seine Hilfe angeboten

diffident

[ˈdɪfɪdnt] adj (person) → poco sicuro/a di sé; (smile) → timido/a, imbarazzato/a
to be diffident about doing sth → esitare a fare qc

diffident

(ˈdifidənt) adjective
not confident.
ˈdiffidently adverb
ˈdiffidence noun
References in classic literature ?
Bhaer was a diffident man and slow to offer his own opinions, not because they were unsettled, but too sincere and earnest to be lightly spoken.
Gouvernail was in no sense a diffident man, for he was not a self-conscious one.
You've opened your house to Jones and me in the most generous way; Jones was remark- ing upon it to-day, just before you came back from the village; for although he wouldn't be likely to say such a thing to you -- because Jones isn't a talker, and is diffident in society -- he has a good heart and a grateful, and knows how to appreciate it when he is well treated; yes, you and your wife have been very hospitable toward us --"
One soon learns to expect this bow and be on the lookout and ready to return it; but to learn to lead off and make the initial bow one's self is a difficult matter for a diffident man.
She was always quick and assured: Isabella slow and diffident.
He was too diffident to do justice to himself; but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behaviour gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart.
Your garb and manner were restricted by rule; your air was often diffident, and altogether that of one refined by nature, but absolutely unused to society, and a good deal afraid of making herself disadvantageously conspicuous by some solecism or blunder; yet when addressed, you lifted a keen, a daring, and a glowing eye to your interlocutor's face: there was penetration and power in each glance you gave; when plied by close questions, you found ready and round answers.
When she left off - and she had not laughed languidly, but with real enjoyment - I said, in my diffident way with her:
I was diffident of quoting it after such lines as Rosalind had recalled, but by the time we had reached our coffee, I plucked up courage to mention it.
Accuse not Nature, she hath don her part; Do thou but thine, and be not diffident Of Wisdom, she deserts thee not, if thou Dismiss not her, when most thou needst her nigh, By attributing overmuch to things Less excellent, as thou thy self perceav'st.
Girls, like men, want to be petted, pitied, and made much of, when they are diffident, in low spirits, or in unrequited love.
Here I may remark that for a long time past I have been feeling twice as shy and diffident as I used to do; I have been finding it impossible to look people in the face.