diffraction

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dif·frac·tion

 (dĭ-frăk′shən)
n.
Change in the directions and intensities of a group of waves after passing by an obstacle or through an aperture whose size is approximately the same as the wavelength of the waves.

[New Latin diffrāctiō, diffrāctiōn-, from Latin diffrāctus, past participle of diffringere : dis-, apart; see dis- + frangere, to break; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

diffraction

(dɪˈfrækʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) physics a deviation in the direction of a wave at the edge of an obstacle in its path
2. (General Physics) any phenomenon caused by diffraction and interference of light, such as the formation of light and dark fringes by the passage of light through a small aperture
3. (General Physics) deflection of sound waves caused by an obstacle or by nonhomogeneity of a medium
[C17: from New Latin diffractiō a breaking to pieces, from Latin diffringere to shatter, from dis- apart + frangere to break]

dif•frac•tion

(dɪˈfræk ʃən)

n.
a modulation of waves in response to an obstacle, as an object, slit, or grating, in the path of propagation, giving rise in light waves to a banded pattern or to a spectrum.
[1665–75; < New Latin diffrāctiō, derivative of Latin diffringere to break up]

dif·frac·tion

(dĭ-frăk′shən)
The bending or turning of a wave, such as a light wave, when it encounters an obstacle, such as an edge, or a hole whose size is similar to the wavelength of the wave. The patterns made by the diffraction of waves can be useful for understanding the minute structures of objects. The diffraction patterns made by x-rays as they pass between the atoms of a molecule, for example, are studied in order to determine the molecule's overall structure. See more at wave.

diffraction

An effect caused when, after passing an obstacle or through a narrow slit, waves (e.g. of light) interfere with each other and may bend or spread.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diffraction - when light passes sharp edges or goes through narrow slits the rays are deflected and produce fringes of light and dark bandsdiffraction - when light passes sharp edges or goes through narrow slits the rays are deflected and produce fringes of light and dark bands
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
X-ray diffraction - the scattering of X rays by the atoms of a crystal; the diffraction pattern shows structure of the crystal
Translations

diffraction

[dɪˈfrækʃən] Ndifracción f

diffraction

nDiffraktion f, → Beugung f

diffraction

[dɪˈfrækʃn] n (Phys) → diffrazione f

dif·frac·tion

n. difracción.
1. desviación de dirección;
2. la descomposición de un rayo de luz y sus componentes al atravesar un cristal o prisma;
___ patternpatrón de ___.
References in classic literature ?
These closely similar particulars are collected together by their similarity primarily and, more correctly, by the fact that they are related to each other approximately according to the laws of perspective and of reflection and diffraction of light.
On the other hand, I used to find Paul Tichlorne plunged as deeply into the study of light polarization, diffraction, and interference, single and double refraction, and all manner of strange organic compounds.
D 2# Reflected channel wave, is formed by reflection of 1# reflection channel wave when encountering the tunnel face; E 3# reflected channel wave, is formed by the reflection of 2# reflection channel wave when encountering fault; F the roadway acoustic wave, is formed by the direct P-wave when propagating into the cavity of the roadway; G the diffracted P-waves at the endpoint of the tunnel face are the multiple diffractions when direct P-wave encounters the endpoint (Kamsani et al.
Compared with multiple diffractions of the endpoint, the diffracted P-wave is clear and easy to recognize and extract, and the reason is that: Diffraction of small fault can also be observed from the receivers ahead of tunnel face, but diffraction of the breakpoint should not be observed from the receivers ahead of tunnel face.
New facilities, including the Australian Synchrotron, have optical systems with the ability to produce images and diffractograms (pictorial images of diffractions rings and spots) with angular resolution (the ability to distinguish small details) as good as the instrument's theoretical limit, deliver coherent or in step photon beams and operate at ultra-short time scales.
A multitude of different scattering, diffraction and imaging techniques can be applied to probe advanced materials.
However, slope diffraction is not sufficient for 0-60 dB dynamic range prediction and, as shown and contributed in this paper, diffractions from the edges of the E plane (which are parallel to the H plane) must be included for the H-plane pattern to compare favorably with measurements and simulations using HFSS.
Edge diffractions have a significant impact on the far side and back lobes but do not affect significantly the forward main lobe.
A traditional four-vane spider actually produces eight diffractions spikes; each vane generates a pair of spikes radiating from its long axis, one on either side of the secondary-mirror hub.
Indeed, if you've spent a lot of time observing with refractors or Schmidt-Cassegrain telescopes, chances are the diffraction spikes will be first thing you'll notice when you step up to the eyepiece of a Newtonian reflector.
This kind of crystal structure was found in even-even, odd, and most of the even nylons, which gives a pair of strong diffractions at 0.
The diffractions of the melt-crystallized samples for the odd-odd nylons show a strong diffraction at 0.