diffusion


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diffusion
In the process of diffusion of a single solute, a concentration of molecules on one side of a membrane (top) will move through a membrane (center) until there is equilibrium on both sides (bottom).

dif·fu·sion

 (dĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The process of diffusing or the condition of being diffused: the diffusion of new technology around the world.
2. Physics
a. The scattering of incident light by reflection from a rough surface.
b. The transmission of light through a translucent material.
c. The spontaneous intermingling of the particles of two or more substances as a result of random thermal motion.
3. The spread of linguistic or cultural practices or innovations within a community or from one community to another.

dif·fu′sion·al adj.

diffusion

(dɪˈfjuːʒən)
n
1. the act or process of diffusing or being diffused; dispersion
2. verbosity
3. (General Physics) physics
a. the random thermal motion of atoms, molecules, clusters of atoms, etc, in gases, liquids, and some solids
b. the transfer of atoms or molecules by their random motion from one part of a medium to another
4. (General Physics) physics the transmission or reflection of electromagnetic radiation, esp light, in which the radiation is scattered in many directions and not directly reflected or refracted; scattering
5. (General Physics) physics Also called: diffusivity the degree to which the directions of propagation of reverberant sound waves differ from point to point in an enclosure
6. (Anthropology & Ethnology) anthropol the transmission of social institutions, skills, and myths from one culture to another

dif•fu•sion

(dɪˈfyu ʒən)

n.
1. the act of diffusing or the state of being diffused.
2. prolixity of speech or writing.
3.
a. an intermingling of particles resulting from random thermal agitation, as in the dispersion of a vapor in air.
b. a reflection or refraction of light or other radiation from an irregular surface or an erratic dispersion through a surface.
4. a soft-focus effect in a photograph or film, achieved by placing a gelatin or silk plate in front of a light or lens or by the use of filters.
5. the transmission of elements or features of one culture to another by nonviolent contact.
[1325–75; Middle English < Late Latin diffūsiō; see diffuse, -tion]

dif·fu·sion

(dĭ-fyo͞o′zhən)
1. The movement of ions or molecules from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration. Small molecules and ions can move across a cell membrane by diffusion. Compare osmosis.
2.
a. The reflection of light off an irregular surface in all directions.
b. The process by which light passes through a transparent substance.
3. The spreading out of light or other radiation through an area so that its intensity becomes more or less uniform.

diffusion

1. The process of rapid random movement of the particles of a liquid or gas which eventually form a uniform mixture.
2. The mixing of substances due to the motion of their particles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diffusion - (physics) the process in which there is movement of a substance from an area of high concentration of that substance to an area of lower concentration
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
osmosis - (biology, chemistry) diffusion of molecules through a semipermeable membrane from a place of higher concentration to a place of lower concentration until the concentration on both sides is equal
permeation, pervasion, suffusion - the process of permeating or infusing something with a substance
transport - an exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes
2.diffusion - the spread of social institutions (and myths and skills) from one society to another
spread, spreading - process or result of distributing or extending over a wide expanse of space
mythology - myths collectively; the body of stories associated with a culture or institution or person
3.diffusion - the property of being diffused or dispersed
dispersion, distribution - the spatial or geographic property of being scattered about over a range, area, or volume; "worldwide in distribution"; "the distribution of nerve fibers"; "in complementary distribution"
4.diffusion - the act of dispersing or diffusing something; "the dispersion of the troops"; "the diffusion of knowledge"
spreading, spread - act of extending over a wider scope or expanse of space or time
crop-dusting, spraying - the dispersion of fungicides or insecticides or fertilizer on growing crops (often from a low-flying aircraft)

diffusion

diffusion

noun
Words or the use of words in excess of those needed for clarity or precision:
Translations

diffusion

[dɪˈfjuːʒən] N [of light, heat, information, ideas] → difusión f

diffusion

[dɪˈfjuːʒən] n
[information, knowledge] → diffusion f
[light, chemicals, molecules] → diffusion f

diffusion

n (of light, heat, rays, fluid etc)Ausbreitung f; (Chem) → Diffusion f; (of perfume, odour)Ausströmung f; (of knowledge, custom, news)Verbreitung f

diffusion

[dɪˈfjuːʒn] n (of ideas, information) → diffusione f; (of light, heat, substances) → spargimento

dif·fu·sion

n. difusión.
1. proceso de difundir;
2. diálisis a través de una membrana.

diffusion

n difusión f
References in classic literature ?
It seemed to argue so wide a diffusion of her shame, that all nature knew of it; it could have caused her no deeper pang had the leaves of the trees whispered the dark story among themselves -- had the summer breeze murmured about it -- had the wintry blast shrieked it aloud
I knew the next day that a letter containing the key had, by the first post, gone off to his London apartments; but in spite of--or perhaps just on account of--the eventual diffusion of this knowledge we quite let him alone till after dinner, till such an hour of the evening, in fact, as might best accord with the kind of emotion on which our hopes were fixed.
We have heard of a Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge.
Rapid currents bearing all these gases in diffusion and torrents of lava slid to the bottom of the mountain like an eruption of Vesuvius on another Terra del Greco.
There seemed a general diffusion of cheerfulness on the occasion.
The people will imitate the nobles, and the result is a thorough diffusion of the proper feeling.
But at sunset the clouds gathered again, bringing an earlier night, and the snow began to fall straight and steadily from a sky without wind, in a soft universal diffusion more confusing than the gusts and eddies of the morning.
If we assume as the historians do that great men lead humanity to the attainment of certain ends- the greatness of Russia or of France, the balance of power in Europe, the diffusion of the ideas of the Revolution general progress or anything else- then it is impossible to explain the facts of history without introducing the conceptions of chance and genius.
It was now long after nightfall, yet the interminable forest through which he journeyed was lit with a wan glimmer having no point of diffusion, for in its mysterious lumination nothing cast a shadow.
For instance, if any preposterous bill were brought forward, for giving poor grubbing devils of authors a right to their own property, I should like to say, that I for one would never consent to opposing an insurmountable bar to the diffusion of literature among THE PEOPLE,--you understand?
The black curtain of the firmament in reality heightened the moon's brilliancy, which in this void of ether unfavorable to diffusion did not eclipse the neighboring stars.
In such cases the geometrical ratio of increase, the result of which never fails to be surprising, simply explains the extraordinarily rapid increase and wide diffusion of naturalised productions in their new homes.