diffusionism


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diffusionism

(dɪˈfjuːʒəˌnɪzəm)
n
a theory that most cultural similarities are the result of diffusion
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These are perhaps best seen in Alexander Goldenweiser's 1925 American Journal of Sociology discussion of diffusionism and culture areas: "As one moves from the center to the periphery, the tribes become less and less fully representative of the culture area.
Diffusionism is a crude, simplistic explanatory model; diffusion, as the transmission of cultural traits, is a reality.
Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric history, The Guildford Press, New York, 1993.
Blaut J (1993) The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History.
Franz Boas's school of cultural diffusionism and relationality), psychology (Ken Wilber's school of the potentially infinite-dimensionality of the psyche and reality's spirit of multi-stratified, multi-levelled multiple holonic evolution), psychiatry, cultural anthropology and earth sciences (Immanuel Velikovsky's school of catastrophism), semantics (Alfred Korzybski's school of space binding and time binding), etc.
It is a major resource without doubt, but since 1987 there has been a wealth of scholarship (Kuklick, Hiatt, Kuper, Livington, Kenny, Gardner) that would have grounded Curr's work within its intellectual context, and perhaps given the reader more confidence in Furphy's discussion of such concepts as evolutionism and diffusionism, and might have led him to see how much Curr's views concurred with degenerationism.
1993): The Colonizer's Model of the World: Geographical Diffusionism and Eurocentric History.
Some approaches tried to do so, such as Diffusionism (whose main idea is that similarities and differences between cultures are caused by the human tendency towards imitation), Culture and Personality--Benedict (1934) and Mead (1950) tried to relate beliefs and cultural practices to personality traits - or Functionalism and Structural Functionalism--Malinowski (1922) and Radcliffe-Brown (1952) considered that Anthropology had to focus on the observation and description of cultures' beliefs and institutions rather than on explaining the origins of the similarities and differences between them.
The theoretical apparatus is that of diffusionism, and cartography is the tool par excellence.
The fact remais that the young Lele, in a kind of diffusionism, mixed their Christianity with their old religious beliefs, which they supposedly fought against.