dig


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dig
Andrew Schacht of Australia at the 2007 Beach Volleyball World Championships
Gstaad, Switzerland

dig

 (dĭg)
v. dug (dŭg), dig·ging, digs
v.tr.
1. To break up, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example), as with a shovel, spade, or snout, or with claws, paws or hands.
2.
a. To make or form by removing earth or other material: dig a trench; dug my way out of the snow.
b. To prepare (soil) by loosening or cultivating.
3.
a. To obtain or unearth by digging: dig coal out of a seam; dug potatoes from a field.
b. To obtain or find by an action similar to digging: dug a dollar out of his pocket; dug the puck out of the corner.
4. To learn or discover by careful research or investigation: dug up the evidence; dug out the real facts.
5. To force down and into something; thrust: dug his foot in the ground.
6. To poke or prod: dug me in the ribs.
7. Sports To strike or redirect (a ball) just before it hits the ground, keeping it in play, as in tennis or volleyball.
8. Slang
a. To understand fully: Do you dig what I mean?
b. To like, enjoy, or appreciate: "They really dig our music and, daddy, I dig swinging for them" (Louis Armstrong).
c. To take notice of: Dig that wild outfit.
v.intr.
1. To loosen, turn over, or remove earth or other material.
2. To make one's way by or as if by pushing aside or removing material: dug through the files.
3. Slang To have understanding: Do you dig?
n.
1. A poke or thrust: a sharp dig in the ribs.
2. A sarcastic, taunting remark; a gibe.
3. An archaeological excavation.
4. Sports An act or an instance of digging a ball.
5. digs Lodgings.
Phrasal Verb:
dig in
1. To dig trenches for protection.
2. To hold on stubbornly, as to a position; entrench oneself.
3. To begin to work intensively.
4. To begin to eat heartily.
Idioms:
dig in (one's) heels
To resist opposition stubbornly; refuse to yield or compromise.
dig it out
Slang To run as fast as one can, especially as a base runner in baseball.

[Middle English diggen; perhaps akin to Old French digue, dike, trench; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language In its slang sense of "to enjoy," dig is one of the many words and expressions that come from African American Vernacular English. Like cool, it is first recorded in 1930s jazz circles. While several AAVE expressions that have entered colloquial American English from jazz still have musical associations, many others do not, and quite a few are so ordinary today that their origin in AAVE is not at all obvious. Some are no longer regarded as slang, such as badmouth, cakewalk, nitty-gritty, and main man. Others, like fox (sexy woman), gig, and chump change are still slang or informal. Of course, American slang has received terms from other musical genres besides jazz and rap. For instance, emo was first used for an often "emotional" genre of rock music originating in the 1980s, and has since been extended to mean "angst-filled, melancholy, or sad."

dig

(dɪɡ)
vb, digs, digging or dug
1. (when: tr, often foll by up) to cut into, break up, and turn over or remove (earth, soil, etc), esp with a spade
2. to form or excavate (a hole, tunnel, passage, etc) by digging, usually with an implement or (of animals) with feet, claws, etc: to dig a tunnel.
3. (often foll by through) to make or force (one's way), esp by removing obstructions: he dug his way through the crowd.
4. (tr; often foll by out or up) to obtain by digging: to dig potatoes; to dig up treasure.
5. (tr; often foll by out or up) to find or discover by effort or searching: to dig out unexpected facts.
6. (tr; foll by in or into) to thrust or jab (a sharp instrument, weapon, etc); poke: he dug his spurs into the horse's side.
7. (Horticulture) (tr; foll by in or into) to mix (compost, etc) with soil by digging
8. (tr) informal to like, understand, or appreciate
9. (Education) (intr) slang US to work hard, esp for an examination
10. (intr) informal Brit to have lodgings: I dig in South London.
n
11. the act of digging
12. a thrust or poke, esp in the ribs
13. a cutting or sarcastic remark
14. (Archaeology) informal an archaeological excavation
[C13 diggen, of uncertain origin]

Dig

(dɪɡ)
n
informal NZ short for Digger1

dig1

(dɪg)

v. dug, dig•ging, v.i.
1. to break up, turn over, or remove earth, sand, etc., as with a shovel, spade, bulldozer, or claw; make an excavation.
2. to make one's way or work by or as if by removing or turning over material: to dig through the files.
v.t.
3. to break up, turn over, or loosen (earth, sand, etc.), as with a shovel (often fol. by up).
4. to form or excavate (a hole, tunnel, etc.) by removing material.
5. to unearth, obtain, or remove by digging (often fol. by up or out).
6. to find or discover by effort or search.
7. to poke, thrust, or force: He dug his heels into the ground.
8. dig in,
a. to maintain one's opinion or position.
b. Informal. to start eating.
9. dig out,
a. to hollow out by digging.
b. to find by searching.
10. dig up, to discover as in the course of digging.
n.
11. a thrust; poke: a dig in the ribs.
12. a cutting, sarcastic remark.
13. an archaeological site undergoing excavation.
14. digs, Informal. living quarters; lodgings.
[1275–1325; Middle English diggen, perhaps representing an Old English derivative of dīc ditch]

dig2

(dɪg)

v. dug, dig•ging. Slang. v.t.
1. to understand: Can you dig what I'm saying?
2. to take notice of: Dig those shoes he's wearing.
3. to like or enjoy.
v.i.
4. to understand.
[1935–40]

dig.

digest.

dig


Past participle: dug
Gerund: digging

Imperative
dig
dig
Present
I dig
you dig
he/she/it digs
we dig
you dig
they dig
Preterite
I dug
you dug
he/she/it dug
we dug
you dug
they dug
Present Continuous
I am digging
you are digging
he/she/it is digging
we are digging
you are digging
they are digging
Present Perfect
I have dug
you have dug
he/she/it has dug
we have dug
you have dug
they have dug
Past Continuous
I was digging
you were digging
he/she/it was digging
we were digging
you were digging
they were digging
Past Perfect
I had dug
you had dug
he/she/it had dug
we had dug
you had dug
they had dug
Future
I will dig
you will dig
he/she/it will dig
we will dig
you will dig
they will dig
Future Perfect
I will have dug
you will have dug
he/she/it will have dug
we will have dug
you will have dug
they will have dug
Future Continuous
I will be digging
you will be digging
he/she/it will be digging
we will be digging
you will be digging
they will be digging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been digging
you have been digging
he/she/it has been digging
we have been digging
you have been digging
they have been digging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been digging
you will have been digging
he/she/it will have been digging
we will have been digging
you will have been digging
they will have been digging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been digging
you had been digging
he/she/it had been digging
we had been digging
you had been digging
they had been digging
Conditional
I would dig
you would dig
he/she/it would dig
we would dig
you would dig
they would dig
Past Conditional
I would have dug
you would have dug
he/she/it would have dug
we would have dug
you would have dug
they would have dug

dig

An archaeological excavation, or a site where one is being carried out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dig - the site of an archeological explorationdig - the site of an archeological exploration; "they set up camp next to the dig"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"
2.dig - an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effectdig - an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets"
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
cheap shot - an unnecessarily aggressive and unfair remark directed at a defenseless person
3.dig - a small gouge (as in the cover of a book); "the book was in good condition except for a dig in the back cover"
gouge, nick, ding, dent - an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)
4.dig - the act of diggingdig - the act of digging; "there's an interesting excavation going on near Princeton"
creating by removal - the act of creating by removing something
5.dig - the act of touching someone suddenly with your finger or elbow; "she gave me a sharp dig in the ribs"
touching, touch - the act of putting two things together with no space between them; "at his touch the room filled with lights"
Verb1.dig - turn up, loosen, or remove earthdig - turn up, loosen, or remove earth; "Dig we must"; "turn over the soil for aeration"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
furrow, groove, rut - hollow out in the form of a furrow or groove; "furrow soil"
rootle, rout, root - dig with the snout; "the pig was rooting for truffles"
spade - dig (up) with a spade; "I spade compost into the flower beds"
shovel - dig with or as if with a shovel; "shovel sand"; "he shovelled in the backyard all afternoon long"
trowel - use a trowel on; for light garden work or plaster work
burrow, tunnel - move through by or as by digging; "burrow through the forest"
pitch in, dig in - eat heartily; "The food was placed on the table and the children pitched in"
dig out - dig out from underneath earth or snow
dig up, excavate, turn up - find by digging in the ground; "I dug up an old box in the garden"
2.dig - create by digging; "dig a hole"; "dig out a channel"
core out, hollow out, hollow - remove the interior of; "hollow out a tree trunk"
lift - take (root crops) out of the ground; "lift potatoes"
trench - dig a trench or trenches; "The National Guardsmen were sent out to trench"
dibble - make a hole with a wooden hand tool; "dibble the ground"
3.dig - work harddig - work hard; "She was digging away at her math homework"; "Lexicographers drudge all day long"
do work, work - be employed; "Is your husband working again?"; "My wife never worked"; "Do you want to work after the age of 60?"; "She never did any work because she inherited a lot of money"; "She works as a waitress to put herself through college"
4.dig - remove, harvest, or recover by digging; "dig salt"; "dig coal"
excavate, unearth - recover through digging; "Schliemann excavated Troy"; "excavate gold"
5.dig - thrust down or into; "dig the oars into the water"; "dig your foot into the floor"
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
6.dig - remove the inner part or the core of; "the mining company wants to excavate the hillside"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
drive - excavate horizontally; "drive a tunnel"
trench, ditch - cut a trench in, as for drainage; "ditch the land to drain it"; "trench the fields"
7.dig - poke or thrust abruptly; "he jabbed his finger into her ribs"
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
8.dig - get the meaning of somethingdig - get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?"
understand - know and comprehend the nature or meaning of; "She did not understand her husband"; "I understand what she means"
figure - understand; "He didn't figure her"
catch on, cotton on, get it, get onto, get wise, twig, latch on, tumble - understand, usually after some initial difficulty; "She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on"
intuit - know or grasp by intuition or feeling
digest - arrange and integrate in the mind; "I cannot digest all this information"

dig

verb
1. hollow out, mine, bore, cut, pierce, quarry, excavate, gouge, scoop out Dig a large hole and bang the stake in.
2. delve, tunnel, burrow, grub, break up earth or soil I changed into clothes more suited to digging.
3. turn over, till, break up, work, hoe He was outside digging the garden.
4. search, hunt, rummage, root, delve, forage, dig down, fossick (Austral. & N.Z.) He dug around in his pocket for his keys.
5. poke, drive, push, stick, punch, stab, thrust, shove, prod, jab She dug her nails into his flesh.
6. (Informal) like, love, enjoy, go for, appreciate, groove (dated slang), delight in, be fond of, be keen on, be partial to I really dig this band's energy.
7. (Informal) understand, follow, grasp, make out, get the drift of (informal) Can you dig what I'm trying to say?
noun
1. cutting remark, crack (slang), insult, taunt, sneer, jeer, quip, barb, wisecrack (informal), gibe She couldn't resist a dig at him after his unfortunate performance.
2. poke, thrust, butt, nudge, prod, jab, punch She silenced him with a sharp dig in the small of the back.
plural noun
1. (Brit. informal) rented accommodation, rooms, quarters, lodgings, rented apartments He went to the city and lived in digs.
dig in (Informal) begin or start eating, tuck in (informal), fall to Pull up a chair and dig in.
dig into something investigate, go into, research into, probe into, delve into, inquire into Reporters are digging into the history of her family.
dig something or someone out
1. excavate, unearth, bring to the surface, disinter, bring out of the ground Rescue workers are digging people out of collapsed buildings.
2. find, locate, track down, unearth, ferret out, lay your hand on, turn up I'll try and dig his phone number out for you.
dig something or someone up
1. unearth, excavate, bring to the surface, disinter, bring out of the ground More bodies have been dug up at the site.
2. discover, find, expose, come up with, come across, uncover, retrieve, unearth, root out (informal), extricate, bring to light His description fits perfectly the evidence dug up by the officer.

dig

verb
1. To break, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example) with or as if with a tool:
2. To make by digging:
3. To go into or through for the purpose of making discoveries or acquiring information:
4. To find by investigation.Out or up:
5. To cause to penetrate with force:
6. To thrust against or into:
7. Slang. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Chiefly British: twig.
Scots: ken.
8. Slang. To receive pleasure from:
Informal: go for.
noun
1. An act of thrusting into or against, as to attract attention:
2. A flippant or sarcastic remark:
Slang: wisecrack.
3. Chiefly British. A building or shelter where one lives.Used in plural:
Translations
حفروَخْزَهيَحْرُث، يَنْكُشيَحْفِرُيَحْفُر، يُنَقِّب
kopatrýpnutírýtvyhloubitvykopat
gravehentydningpufpuffeskubbe
kaivaakaivauskaivellatajutatonkia
kopati
bökésoldalba bök
grafa meî skóflumoka, grafasneiî, háîsleg athugasemdÿta, gefa olnbogaskot
掘る
(...을) 파다
atkastiatrastibestiįgėlimasiškasti
dunkadzēlīga piezīmeiegrūst dunkurakt
kopaćkopnąćwykopywać
kopať
kopatiprekopatiizkopati
gräva
ขุด
kazmakaçmakdirsek vurmadirsek vurmakdürtme
đào

dig

[dɪg] (dug (vb: pt, pp))
A. N
1. (Archeol) → excavación f
2. (= prod) (gen) → empujón m; (with elbow) → codazo m
3. (= taunt) → indirecta f, pulla f
to have a dig at sblanzar una indirecta or una pulla a algn
B. VT
1. [+ hole] [person] → cavar, excavar; [machine] → excavar; [animal] → cavar, escarbar
to dig one's own gravecavar su propia tumba
2. (= break up) [+ ground] → remover
3. (= cultivate) [+ garden] → cultivar, cavar en
4. (= add) [+ fertilizer, compost] → meter (into en) → añadir (into a)
5. (= extract) [+ coal] → extraer, sacar
6. (= thrust) to dig sth into sthclavar algo en algo, hundir algo en algo
7. (= prod) → empujar; (with elbow) → dar un codazo a
to dig sb in the ribsdar a algn un codazo en las costillas
8. (esp US) (o.f.) (= enjoy) I don't dig jazzno me gusta el jazz, el jazz no me dice nada
I really dig thateso me chifla
dig this!¡mira esto!
C. VI
1. [person] (gen) → cavar (Archeol, Tech) → excavar; [dog, pig] → escarbar
to dig for goldexcavar en busca de oro
2. (= search) → ahondar
to dig deeper into a subjectahondar or profundizar en un tema
he dug into his pockets for a coinhurgó en los bolsillos para buscar una moneda
to dig deep into one's pocketrascarse el bolsillo
dig in
A. VI + ADV
1. (= eat) → meter mano a la comida
dig in!¡a comer!
2. (also dig o.s. in) (Mil) → atrincherarse (fig) (in negotiations, argument) → atrincherarse en su postura
B. VT + ADV
1. (= add) [+ fertilizer, compost] → añadir al suelo
2. (= thrust) [+ nails, claws, knife] → clavar, hundir
to dig in one's heelsmantenerse en sus trece, empecinarse
3. (Mil) his troops are now well dug insus tropas se hallan ahora bien atrincheradas
dig into VI + PREP
1. (= use up) [+ reserves] → consumir, usar
I had to dig into my savings to pay for ittuve que recurrir a or echar mano de mis ahorros para pagarlo
2. (= investigate) [+ sb's past] → remover, hurgar en
3. (= start) [+ food] → hincar el diente a, atacar
to dig into a mealhincar el diente a una comida
dig out VT + ADV
1. [+ buried object] (gen) → desenterrar, sacar; (from rubble) → sacar (de entre los escombros)
2. (= extract) [+ thorn in flesh] → extraer, quitar
3. (= search out) → buscar
dig over VT + ADV [+ earth] → remover; [+ garden] → remover la tierra de
dig up VT + ADV
1. [+ potatoes] → sacar; [+ weeds] → arrancar; [+ plant] → desarraigar; [+ flowerbed] → cavar en, remover la tierra de; [+ roadway] → levantar; [+ grave] → abrir; [+ treasure, body, artifacts] → desenterrar
2. [+ information] → desenterrar, sacar a la luz
see also dirt, past

dig

[ˈdɪg]
vb [dug] [ˈdʌg] (pt, pp)
vt
(= excavate) [+ hole] → creuser
(= cultivate) [+ garden] → bêcher
(= sink) to dig sth into sth → enfoncer qch dans qch
to dig one's nails into sth → enfoncer ses ongles dans qch
vi
(with spade)creuser
to dig for sth → creuser pour trouver qch
to dig into sth [+ snow, soil] → creuser qch
to dig into one's pocket (lit) (to find sth)chercher dans sa poche (fig) (= spend one's own money) → mettre de sa poche
(ARCHAEOLOGY)faire des fouilles
(= cut) to dig into sth → s'enfoncer dans qch
n
(= prod) → coup m de coude
a dig in the ribs → un coup de coude dans les côtes
(= gibe) → pique f
a dig at sb → une pique à qn
to have a dig at sb, to take a dig at sb → lancer une pique à qn
(ARCHAEOLOGY) (= excavation) → fouilles fpl
dig around
vi (= look for information) → faire son enquête
to dig around in sb's past → faire son enquête sur le passé de qn
dig in
vi
(also dig o.s. in) [soldier] → se retrancher
(= eat) → attaquer un repas
vt sep
[+ compost] → mélanger
to dig compost into the soil → mélanger le compost à la terre
[+ knife, claw] → enfoncer
to dig one's heels in, to dig in one's heels (fig)se braquer, se buter
dig out
vt
(with spades) [+ survivors, car from snow] → sortir (à coups de pelles or pioches), dégager (à coups de pelles or pioches)
(= find) → dénicher
dig up
vt sep
(= remove from ground) → déterrer
(= excavate) → retourner
(= find) → dénicher

dig

vb: pret, ptp <dug>
vt
groundgraben; gardenumgraben; graveausheben; trench, hole, tunnel etcgraben, ausheben; to dig potatoesKartoffeln roden; they dug their way out of prisonsie gruben sich (dat)einen (Flucht)tunnel aus dem Gefängnis
(= poke, thrust)bohren (→ sth into sth etw in etw acc); to dig somebody in the ribsjdm or jdn in die Rippen stoßen
(inf: = enjoy) → stehen auf (+dat) (inf); (= understand)kapieren (inf)
vi
(person)graben; (dog, pig)wühlen, graben; (Tech) → schürfen; (Archeol) → (aus)graben, Ausgrabungen machen; to dig for mineralsErz schürfen; to dig in one’s pockets for somethingin seinen Taschen nach etw suchen or wühlen; to dig deep (Sport, fig) → auf seine letzten Reserven zurückgreifen; (fig, in one’s memory) → lange überlegen; (= investigate)gründlich nachforschen
(inf, = taunt) to dig at somebodyjdn anschießen or anmotzen (inf)
n
(Brit: with hand, elbow) → Puff m, → Stoß m; to give somebody a dig in the ribsjdm einen Rippenstoß geben
(Brit: = sarcastic remark) → Seitenhieb m, → Spitze f; to have a dig at somebody/somethingeine spitze Bemerkung über jdn/etw machen
(Archeol) → (Aus)grabung f; (= site)Ausgrabungsstätte f

dig

[dɪg] (dug (vb: pt, pp))
1. n
a. (with elbow) → gomitata
to give sb a dig in the ribs → dare una gomitata (nel fianco) a qn
b. (fam) (taunt) → frecciata, insinuazione f
to have a dig at sb/sth → lanciare una frecciata a qn/qc
c. (Archeol) → scavo, scavi mpl
2. vt
a. (ground, hole) → scavare; (garden) → zappare, vangare
b. (poke, thrust) to dig sth into sthconficcare qc in qc
to dig one's nails into → conficcare le unghie in
c. (old) (fam) dig that beat, man!senti che forza quel ritmo!
I don't dig that kind of scene (old) (fam) → quell'ambiente non mi va a genio
he really digs jazz (old) (fam) → va pazzo per il jazz
3. vi (gen) (Tech) → scavare (Archeol) → fare degli scavi
to dig for minerals → scavare alla ricerca di minerali
to dig into one's pockets for sth → frugarsi le tasche cercando qc
dig in
1. vi + adv
a. (fam) (eat) → attaccare a mangiare
dig in! → dateci sotto!
b. (also dig o.s. in) (Mil) → trincerarsi (fig) → insediarsi, installarsi
2. vt + adv (compost) → interrare; (knife, claw) → affondare
to dig in one's heels (fig) → impuntarsi
dig out vt + adv (survivors, car from snow) → tirar fuori (scavando), estrarre (scavando) (fig) → scovare
dig up vt + adv (potatoes, treasure, body) → dissotterrare; (tree etc) → sradicare; (weeds) → estirpare (fig) (fam) (fact, information) → pescare

dig

(dig) present participle ˈdigging: past tense, past participle dug (dag) verb
1. to turn up (earth) with a spade etc. to dig the garden.
2. to make (a hole) in this way. The child dug a tunnel in the sand.
3. to poke. He dug his brother in the ribs with his elbow.
noun
a poke. a dig in the ribs; I knew that his remarks about women drivers were a dig at me (= a joke directed at me).
ˈdigger noun
a machine for digging.
dig out
1. to get out by digging. We had to dig the car out of the mud.
2. to find by searching. I'll see if I can dig out that photo.
dig up
We dug up that old tree; They dug up a skeleton; They're digging up the road yet again.

dig

يَحْفِرُ kopat grave graben σκάβω cavar kaivaa creuser kopati scavare 掘る (...을) 파다 graven grave kopnąć cavar копать gräva ขุด kazmak đào

dig

v. excavar, extraer.
References in classic literature ?
Meg went back to toast her feet and read IVANHOE, and Jo began to dig paths with great energy.
He was on the steamer when I went down to Peru to help the Titus Brothers dig the big tunnel.
I had almost forgotten that I had a grandmother, when she came out, her sunbonnet on her head, a grain-sack in her hand, and asked me if I did not want to go to the garden with her to dig potatoes for dinner.
I'd give it all to you, the pirate gold and every bit of treasure we could dig up.
We will go back, and dig our graves behind those ramparts.
No--I reckon one o' them fancy groups--one o' them Latin goddesses that Fairfax is always gassin' about, sorter leadin', directin' and bossin' us where to dig.
To go of errands with his slow and shuffling gait, which made you doubt how he ever was to arrive anywhere; to saw a small household's foot or two of firewood, or knock to pieces an old barrel, or split up a pine board for kindling-stuff; in summer, to dig the few yards of garden ground appertaining to a low-rented tenement, and share the produce of his labor at the halves; in winter, to shovel away the snow from the sidewalk, or open paths to the woodshed, or along the clothes-line; such were some of the essential offices which Uncle Venner performed among at least a score of families.
Why should he work for his living here, or go to dig gold in California, when he is so soon to be made happy, at monthly intervals, with a little pile of glittering coin out of his Uncle's pocket?
Rig it, dig it, stig it, quig it, bell-boy; Make fire-flies; break the jinglers
For nothing was this man more remarkable, than for a certain impersonal stolidity as it were; impersonal, I say; for it so shaded off into the surrounding infinite of things, that it seemed one with the general stolidity discernible in the whole visible world; which while pauselessly active in uncounted modes, still eternally holds its peace, and ignores you, though you dig foundations for cathedrals.
They own not merely the labor of society, they have bought the governments; and everywhere they use their raped and stolen power to intrench themselves in their privileges, to dig wider and deeper the channels through which the river of profits flows to them
It was a kind of satire on Nature: it was the scientific method, the geologic method; it deposited the history of the family in a stratified record; and the antiquary could dig through it and tell by the remains of each period what changes of diet the family had introduced successively for a hundred years.