digest


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to digest: Reader's Digest

di·gest

 (dī-jĕst′, dĭ-)
v. di·gest·ed, di·gest·ing, di·gests
v.tr.
1. To convert (food) into simpler chemical compounds that can be absorbed and assimilated by an organism, as by chemical and muscular action in the digestive tract.
2. To think over so as to understand; absorb or assimilate: It took a minute to digest the implications of the remark.
3.
a. To organize into a systematic arrangement, usually by summarizing or classifying.
b. To condense or abridge (a written work).
4. Chemistry To soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.
v.intr.
1.
a. To become assimilated into the body.
b. To assimilate food substances.
2. Chemistry To undergo exposure to heat, liquids, or chemical agents.
n. (dī′jĕst′)
1. A collection of previously published material, such as articles, essays, or reports, usually in edited or condensed form.
2. Law A systematic arrangement of abstracts from court decisions designed to simplify the locating of relevant case law.
3. A periodical containing literary abridgments or other condensed works.
4. Digest See pandect.

[Middle English digesten, from Latin dīgerere, dīgest-, to separate, arrange : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + gerere, to carry. N., from Latin dīgesta, neuter pl. of dīgestus, past participle of dīgerere, to separate.]

digest

vb
1. (Physiology) to subject (food) to a process of digestion
2. (Psychology) (tr) to assimilate mentally
3. (Chemistry) chem to soften or disintegrate or be softened or disintegrated by the action of heat, moisture, or chemicals; decompose
4. (tr) to arrange in a methodical or systematic order; classify
5. (tr) to reduce to a summary
6. (tr) archaic to tolerate
n
7. (Library Science & Bibliography) a comprehensive and systematic compilation of information or material, often condensed
8. (Journalism & Publishing) a magazine, periodical, etc, that summarizes news of current events
9. (Law) a compilation of rules of law based on decided cases
[C14: from Late Latin dīgesta writings grouped under various heads, from Latin dīgerere to divide, from di- apart + gerere to bear]

Digest

(ˈdaɪdʒɛst)
n
1. (Law) Roman law an arrangement of excerpts from the writings and opinions of eminent lawyers, contained in 50 books compiled by order of Justinian in the sixth century ad
2. (Historical Terms) Roman law an arrangement of excerpts from the writings and opinions of eminent lawyers, contained in 50 books compiled by order of Justinian in the sixth century ad

di•gest

(v. dɪˈdʒɛst, daɪ-; n. ˈdaɪ dʒɛst)

v.t.
1. to convert (food) in the alimentary canal into a form that can be assimilated by the body.
2. to promote the digestion of (food).
3. to obtain ideas or meaning from; assimilate mentally: to digest an article on nuclear energy.
4. to think over; ponder.
5. to bear with patience; endure.
6. to arrange in convenient or methodical order; reduce to a system; classify.
7. to condense, abridge, or summarize.
8. to soften or disintegrate (a substance), as by moisture, heat, or chemical action.
v.i.
9. to digest food.
10. to undergo digestion.
n.
11. a collection or compendium, as of literary or scientific matter, esp. when classified or condensed.
12. a systematic abstract of some body of law.
[1350–1400; (v.) Middle English < Latin dīgestus, past participle of dīgerere to disperse =dī- di-2 + gerere to carry; (n.) Middle English: collection of laws < Latin dīgesta, neuter pl. of dīgestus]
di•gest′ed•ly, adv.
di•gest′ed•ness, n.
syn: See summary.

Digest

 a condensed or digested collection of fiction or of statements or information.
Examples: digest of laws, 1626; of scriptural text, 1825.

digest


Past participle: digested
Gerund: digesting

Imperative
digest
digest
Present
I digest
you digest
he/she/it digests
we digest
you digest
they digest
Preterite
I digested
you digested
he/she/it digested
we digested
you digested
they digested
Present Continuous
I am digesting
you are digesting
he/she/it is digesting
we are digesting
you are digesting
they are digesting
Present Perfect
I have digested
you have digested
he/she/it has digested
we have digested
you have digested
they have digested
Past Continuous
I was digesting
you were digesting
he/she/it was digesting
we were digesting
you were digesting
they were digesting
Past Perfect
I had digested
you had digested
he/she/it had digested
we had digested
you had digested
they had digested
Future
I will digest
you will digest
he/she/it will digest
we will digest
you will digest
they will digest
Future Perfect
I will have digested
you will have digested
he/she/it will have digested
we will have digested
you will have digested
they will have digested
Future Continuous
I will be digesting
you will be digesting
he/she/it will be digesting
we will be digesting
you will be digesting
they will be digesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been digesting
you have been digesting
he/she/it has been digesting
we have been digesting
you have been digesting
they have been digesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been digesting
you will have been digesting
he/she/it will have been digesting
we will have been digesting
you will have been digesting
they will have been digesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been digesting
you had been digesting
he/she/it had been digesting
we had been digesting
you had been digesting
they had been digesting
Conditional
I would digest
you would digest
he/she/it would digest
we would digest
you would digest
they would digest
Past Conditional
I would have digested
you would have digested
he/she/it would have digested
we would have digested
you would have digested
they would have digested
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.digest - a periodical that summarizes the news
periodical - a publication that appears at fixed intervals
2.digest - something that is compiled (as into a single book or file)
compendium, collection - a publication containing a variety of works
Verb1.digest - convert food into absorbable substances; "I cannot digest milk products"
digest - become assimilated into the body; "Protein digests in a few hours"
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"
stomach - bear to eat; "He cannot stomach raw fish"
predigest - digest (food) beforehand
2.digest - arrange and integrate in the mind; "I cannot digest all this information"
apprehend, comprehend, get the picture, grok, savvy, grasp, compass, dig - get the meaning of something; "Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?"
3.digest - put up with something or somebody unpleasantdigest - put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
live with, swallow, accept - tolerate or accommodate oneself to; "I shall have to accept these unpleasant working conditions"; "I swallowed the insult"; "She has learned to live with her husband's little idiosyncrasies"
hold still for, stand for - tolerate or bear; "I won't stand for this kind of behavior!"
bear up - endure cheerfully; "She bore up under the enormous strain"
take lying down - suffer without protest; suffer or endure passively; "I won't take this insult lying down"
take a joke - listen to a joke at one's own expense; "Can't you take a joke?"
sit out - endure to the end
pay - bear (a cost or penalty), in recompense for some action; "You'll pay for this!"; "She had to pay the penalty for speaking out rashly"; "You'll pay for this opinion later"
countenance, permit, allow, let - consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam"
suffer - experience (emotional) pain; "Every time her husband gets drunk, she suffers"
4.digest - become assimilated into the body; "Protein digests in a few hours"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
digest - convert food into absorbable substances; "I cannot digest milk products"
5.digest - systematize, as by classifying and summarizing; "the government digested the entire law into a code"
systematise, systematize, systemise, systemize - arrange according to a system or reduce to a system; "systematize our scientific knowledge"
6.digest - soften or disintegrate, as by undergoing exposure to heat or moisture
digest - soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture
disintegrate - break into parts or components or lose cohesion or unity; "The material disintegrated"; "the group disintegrated after the leader died"
7.digest - make more concise; "condense the contents of a book into a summary"
abbreviate, abridge, foreshorten, shorten, contract, reduce, cut - reduce in scope while retaining essential elements; "The manuscript must be shortened"
capsule, capsulise, capsulize, encapsulate - put in a short or concise form; reduce in volume; "capsulize the news"
telescope - make smaller or shorter; "the novel was telescoped into a short play"
8.digest - soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture
decompose, break down, break up - separate (substances) into constituent elements or parts
digest - soften or disintegrate, as by undergoing exposure to heat or moisture

digest

verb
1. ingest, absorb, incorporate, dissolve, assimilate She couldn't digest food properly.
2. take in, master, absorb, grasp, drink in, soak up, devour, assimilate She read everything, digesting every fragment of news.
noun
1. summary, résumé, abstract, epitome, condensation, compendium, synopsis, précis, abridgment a regular digest of environmental statistics

digest

verb
To take in and incorporate, especially mentally:
Informal: soak (up).
Translations
مُلَخَّص، مُخْتَصَريَسْتَوْعِب، يَفْهَميَهْضُميَهْضِمُ
trávitvyrovnat sepřehledstrávit
fordøjereferatresumésammendrag
annostellajärjestelläluokitellasulaasulattaa
probaviti
megemészttömör kivonat
meltamelta , velta fyrir sér
消化する
소화하다
suvirškintivirškinamasvirškinantisvirškinimasvirškinti
aptvertizprastsagremot
prebaviti
smälta
ย่อย
tiêu hóa

digest

A. [daɪˈdʒest] VT
1. [+ food] → digerir
easy to digestfácil de digerir
2. (= assimilate) [+ information, news] → asimilar, digerir
3. (= summarize) → resumir
B. [daɪˈdʒest] VIdigerir
C. [ˈdaɪdʒest] N
1. (= summary) → resumen m
2. (= journal) → boletín m
3. (Jur) → digesto m, recopilación f de leyes

digest

[dɪˈdʒɛst daɪˈdʒɛst]
vt
[+ food] → digérer
(= take in) [+ news, information] → digérer
vi [food] → se digérer
[ˈdaɪdʒɛst] n (= collection) → sommaire m, résumé m

digest

vt (lit, fig)verdauen
viverdauen
n
(of book, facts)Digest m or nt, → Auswahl f
(Jur) → Gesetzessammlung f

digest

[vb daɪˈdʒɛst; n ˈdaɪdʒɛst]
1. vtdigerire; (information) → assimilare
it is easily digested (food) → è facilmente digeribile
2. vidigerirsi
3. n (summary) → compendio

digest

(daiˈdʒest) verb
1. to break up (food) in the stomach etc and turn it into a form which the body can use. The invalid had to have food that was easy to digest.
2. to take in and think over (information etc). It took me some minutes to digest what he had said.
noun
summary; brief account. a digest of the week's news.
diˈgestible adjective
able to be digested. This food is scarcely digestible.
diˈgestion (-tʃən) noun
1. the act of digesting food.
2. the ability of one's body to digest food. poor digestion.
diˈgestive (-tiv) adjective
of digestion. the human digestive system.

digest

يَهْضِمُ trávit fordøje verdauen χωνεύω digerir sulattaa ruoka digérer probaviti digerire 消化する 소화하다 verteren fordøye przetrawić digerir переваривать smälta ย่อย sindirmek tiêu hóa 消化

di·gest

v. digerir.

digest

vt digerir
References in classic literature ?
Little Teddy bore a charmed life, for nothing ever happened to him, and Jo never felt any anxiety when he was whisked up into a tree by one lad, galloped off on the back of another, or supplied with sour russets by his indulgent papa, who labored under the Germanic delusion that babies could digest anything, from pickled cabbage to buttons, nails, and their own small shoes.
And while Hepzibah was doing her utmost to digest the hard little pellets of his already uttered wisdom, he gave vent to his final, and what he declared to be his all-important advice, as follows:--
In the way of furniture, there is a stove with a voluminous funnel; an old pine desk with a three-legged stool beside it; two or three wooden-bottom chairs, exceedingly decrepit and infirm; and -- not to forget the library -- on some shelves, a score or two of volumes of the Acts of Congress, and a bulky Digest of the Revenue laws.
Do you know, gentlemen --very gravely and mathematically bowing to each Captain in succession -- Do you know, gentlemen, that the digestive organs of the whale are so inscrutably constructed by Divine Providence, that it is quite impossible for him to completely digest even a man's arm?
I hardly know where I found the hardihood thus to open a conversation with a stranger; the step was contrary to my nature and habits: but I think her occupation touched a chord of sympathy somewhere; for I too liked reading, though of a frivolous and childish kind; I could not digest or comprehend the serious or substantial.
he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine aid to digest his dinner, and his pious ejaculation had no reference to my unexpected advent.
He could digest radishes, and sleep after green tea.
Therefore what he gives (Whose praise be ever sung) to man in part Spiritual, may of purest Spirits be found No ingrateful food: and food alike those pure Intelligential substances require As doth your Rational; and both contain Within them every lower facultie Of sense, whereby they hear, see, smell, touch, taste, Tasting concoct, digest, assimilate, And corporeal to incorporeal turn.
It is well,'' said Prince John, haughtily; ``although unused to such refusals, we will endeavour to digest our banquet as we may, though ungraced by the most successful in arms, and his elected Queen of Beauty.
On the contrary, that same assembly which issued the Declaration of Independence, instead of continuing to act in the name and by the authority of the good people of the United States, had, immediately after the appointment of the committee to prepare the Declaration, appointed another committee, of one member from each colony, to prepare and digest the form of confederation to be entered into between the colonies.
Had the convention attempted a positive enumeration of the powers necessary and proper for carrying their other powers into effect, the attempt would have involved a complete digest of laws on every subject to which the Constitution relates; accommodated too, not only to the existing state of things, but to all the possible changes which futurity may produce; for in every new application of a general power, the PARTICULAR POWERS, which are the means of attaining the OBJECT of the general power, must always necessarily vary with that object, and be often properly varied whilst the object remains the same.
and leaving him to digest that if he could, I hurried on after the artillery- man.