digestion


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Related to digestion: Chemical digestion

di·ges·tion

 (dī-jĕs′chən, dĭ-)
n.
1.
a. The process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed and assimilated by a living organism. In most animals it is accomplished in the digestive tract by the mechanical and enzymatic breakdown of foods into simpler chemical compounds.
b. The result of this process.
c. The ability to digest food.
2. The process of decomposing organic matter in sewage by bacteria.
3. Assimilation of ideas or information; understanding.

digestion

(dɪˈdʒɛstʃən; daɪ-)
n
1. (Physiology) the act or process in living organisms of breaking down ingested food material into easily absorbed and assimilated substances by the action of enzymes and other agents.
2. (Psychology) mental assimilation, esp of ideas
3. (Microbiology) bacteriol the decomposition of sewage by the action of bacteria
4. (Chemistry) chem the treatment of material with heat, solvents, chemicals, etc, to cause softening or decomposition
[C14: from Old French, from Latin digestiō a dissolving, digestion]
diˈgestional adj

di•ges•tion

(dɪˈdʒɛs tʃən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the process in the alimentary canal by which food is broken up physically, as by the action of the teeth, and chemically, as by the action of enzymes, and converted into a substance suitable for absorption and assimilation into the body.
2. the function or power of digesting food.
3. the act of digesting or the state of being digested.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin]

di·ges·tion

(dī-jĕs′chən)
1. The process by which food is broken down into simple chemical compounds that can be absorbed and used as nutrients or eliminated by the body. In most animals, nutrients are obtained from food by the action of digestive enzymes. In humans and other higher vertebrates, digestion takes place mainly in the small intestine.
2. The decomposition of sewage by bacteria.

digestion

1. The breakdown of large food molecules into smaller ones prior to absorption.
2. The chemical and mechanical breakdown of foods into simple substances that can be absorbed by the body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.digestion - the process of decomposing organic matter (as in sewage) by bacteria or by chemical action or heatdigestion - the process of decomposing organic matter (as in sewage) by bacteria or by chemical action or heat
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
2.digestion - the organic process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed into the body
gastric digestion - the process of breaking down proteins by the action of the gastric juice in the stomach
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
3.digestion - learning and coming to understand ideas and information; "his appetite for facts was better than his digestion"
learning, acquisition - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge; "the child's acquisition of language"

digestion

noun ingestion, absorption, incorporation, assimilation Liquids served with meals interfere with digestion.
Related words
adjective peptic

digestion

noun
The process of absorbing and incorporating, especially mentally:
Translations
هَضْمقُدْرَه على الهَضْم
trávenízažívání
fordøjelse
ruoansulatus
probava
emésztésmegemésztés
meltingmeltingarstarfsemi
消化
소화
trávenie
prebava
matsmältning
การย่อย
sindirimsindirme
sự tiêu hóa

digestion

[dɪˈdʒestʃən] Ndigestión f

digestion

[daɪˈdʒɛstʃən dɪˈdʒɛstʃən daɪˈdʒɛstʃən] n
(= process) → digestion f
to aid digestion → aider la digestion
the digestion of sth → la digestion de qch
(= system) → digestion f

digestion

nVerdauung f

digestion

[dɪˈdʒɛstʃn] ndigestione f

digest

(daiˈdʒest) verb
1. to break up (food) in the stomach etc and turn it into a form which the body can use. The invalid had to have food that was easy to digest.
2. to take in and think over (information etc). It took me some minutes to digest what he had said.
noun
summary; brief account. a digest of the week's news.
diˈgestible adjective
able to be digested. This food is scarcely digestible.
diˈgestion (-tʃən) noun
1. the act of digesting food.
2. the ability of one's body to digest food. poor digestion.
diˈgestive (-tiv) adjective
of digestion. the human digestive system.

digestion

هَضْم trávení fordøjelse Verdauung χώνευση digestión ruoansulatus digestion probava digestione 消化 소화 spijsvertering fordøyelse trawienie digestão пищеварение matsmältning การย่อย sindirim sự tiêu hóa 消化

di·ges·tion

n. digestión, transformación de líquidos y sólidos en sustancias más simples para ser asimiladas por el organismo;
gastric ______ gástrica;
intestinal ______ intestinal, del intestino;
pancreatic ______ pancreática.

digestion

n digestión f
References in classic literature ?
Oh, that's all right, that's all right, give us a rest; never mind about the direction, HANG the direction -- I beg pardon, I beg a thousand pardons, I am not well to-day; pay no attention when I soliloquize, it is an old habit, an old, bad habit, and hard to get rid of when one's digestion is all disordered with eating food that was raised forever and ever before he was born; good land
Perkins bore this for several days until his temper, digestion, and appetite were all sensibly affected; then he bowed his head to the inevitable, and Emma Jane flew, like a captive set free, to the loved one's bower.
When her mind gradually filled itself with robins, and moorland cottages crowded with children, with queer crabbed old gardeners and common little Yorkshire housemaids, with springtime and with secret gardens coming alive day by day, and also with a moor boy and his "creatures," there was no room left for the disagreeable thoughts which affected her liver and her digestion and made her yellow and tired.
The admiral was plainly afraid of offending his cook on the one hand, and of offending his digestion on the other -- and Brutus and Cassius were the two trained accomplices who regularly helped him every day off the horns of his dilemma.
If I could be less affectionate and sensitive, I should have a better digestion and an iron set of nerves.
Even our digestion is governed by angels," said Blake; and if you will resist the trivial inclination to substitute "bad angels," is there really any greater mystery than the process by which beef is turned into brains, and beer into beauty?
Now Morn her rosie steps in th' Eastern Clime Advancing, sow'd the Earth with Orient Pearle, When ADAM wak't, so customd, for his sleep Was Aerie light, from pure digestion bred, And temperat vapors bland, which th' only sound Of leaves and fuming rills, AURORA's fan, Lightly dispers'd, and the shrill Matin Song Of Birds on every bough; so much the more His wonder was to find unwak'nd EVE With Tresses discompos'd, and glowing Cheek, As through unquiet rest: he on his side Leaning half-rais'd, with looks of cordial Love Hung over her enamour'd, and beheld Beautie, which whether waking or asleep, Shot forth peculiar Graces; then with voice Milde, as when ZEPHYRUS on FLORA breathes, Her hand soft touching, whisperd thus.
It is allowed, that senates and great councils are often troubled with redundant, ebullient, and other peccant humours; with many diseases of the head, and more of the heart; with strong convulsions, with grievous contractions of the nerves and sinews in both hands, but especially the right; with spleen, flatus, vertigos, and deliriums; with scrofulous tumours, full of fetid purulent matter; with sour frothy ructations: with canine appetites, and crudeness of digestion, besides many others, needless to mention.
But what I am of opinion the governor should cat now in order to preserve and fortify his health is a hundred or so of wafer cakes and a few thin slices of conserve of quinces, which will settle his stomach and help his digestion.
In the next place, how could digestion be carried on in the stomach unless the heart communicated heat to it through the arteries, and along with this certain of the more fluid parts of the blood, which assist in the dissolution of the food that has been taken in?
This nose vigorously divided a pale face into two sections which seemed to have no knowledge of each other, for one side would redden under the process of digestion, while the other continued white.
This man, perhaps, may have an easy conscience and a good digestion.