diggings


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dig·gings

 (dĭg′ĭngz)
pl.n.
1. An excavation site, as for digging or mining ore, metals, or precious stones.
2. Materials that have been excavated.
3. Chiefly British Rooms; lodgings.

diggings

(ˈdɪɡɪŋz)
pl n
1. (functioning as plural) material that has been dug out
2. (Mining & Quarrying) (functioning as singular or plural) a place where mining, esp gold mining, has taken place
3. (functioning as plural) informal Brit a less common name for digs

dig•gings

(ˈdɪg ɪŋz for 1–3; ˈdɪg ənz for 4 )

n.pl.
1. (usu. with a sing. v.) a place where digging is carried on.
2. a mining operation or locality.
3. matter removed from an excavation.
4. Chiefly Brit. Informal. dig 1 (def. 14).
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diggings - an excavation for ore or precious stones or for archaeology
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.diggings - temporary living quartersdiggings - temporary living quarters    
living quarters, quarters - housing available for people to live in; "he found quarters for his family"; "I visited his bachelor quarters"
Translations

diggings

pl
(Min) → Bergwerk nt; (= minerals)Funde pl; (Archeol) → Grabungsort m
(dated US) = digs

diggings

[ˈdɪgɪŋz] npl (Archeol) → scavi mpl
References in classic literature ?
The miners were in from Moseyed Creek and the other diggings to the west, the summer washing had been good, and the men's pouches were heavy with dust and nuggets.
In the shade sat a little boy dressed in sailor clothes, who was digging a hole in the earth with a bit of wood.
With two spatulate hands the handling-machine was digging out and flinging masses of clay into the pear-shaped receptacle above, while with another arm it periodically opened a door and removed rusty and black- ened clinkers from the middle part of the machine.
So, though we can do little without the map, we might make a start by digging there.
Digging began usually at six o'clock, and extended indefinitely into the dusk or moonlight.
On the 4th of November fifty workmen commenced digging, in the very center of the enclosed space on the summit of Stones Hill, a circular hole sixty feet in diameter.
When the storm of dust had cleared away and the summer night was calm again, numbers of people choked up every avenue of access, and parties of diggers were formed to relieve one another in digging among the ruins.
An old man, with his face turned to the sea, was making a weary attempt at digging upon a small potato patch.
The Wild Sow, whom you see daily digging up the earth, wishes to uproot the oak, so she may on its fall seize our families as food for her young.
Drive past Tatarinova, a lot of digging is going on there.
Harling out in her yard, digging round her mountain-ash tree.
In the course of her digging with her pointed stick Mistress Mary had found herself digging up a sort of white root rather like an onion.