dignitary


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

dig·ni·tar·y

 (dĭg′nĭ-tĕr′ē)
n. pl. dig·ni·tar·ies
A person of high rank or position.

dignitary

(ˈdɪɡnɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -taries
a person of high official position or rank, esp in government or the church

dig•ni•tar•y

(ˈdɪg nɪˌtɛr i)

n., pl. -tar•ies.
a person who holds a high rank or office, as in a government or church.
[1665–75; dignit (y) + -ary]
dig`ni•tar′i•al (-ˈtɛər i əl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dignitary - an important or influential (and often overbearing) persondignitary - an important or influential (and often overbearing) person
important person, influential person, personage - a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events

dignitary

noun public figure, worthy, notable, high-up (informal), bigwig (informal), celeb (informal), personage, pillar of society, pillar of the church, notability, pillar of the state, V.I.P. He was a visiting dignitary of great importance.

dignitary

noun
Translations
وَجيه، صاحِب رُتْبَه أو مَقام
hodnostář
dignitarfornem person
maîur í virîingarstöîu
aukštas pareigūnas
augsta amatpersona
hodnostár
önde gelen kişiyüksek mevkili kimse

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtərɪ] Ndignatario/a m/f

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtəri] ndignitaire m

dignitary

nWürdenträger(in) m(f); the local dignitariesdie Honoratioren am Ort

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtrɪ] ndignitario

dignitary

(ˈdignitəri) plural ˈdignitaries noun
a person who has a high rank or office.
References in classic literature ?
Andrews was now conducting him to that dignitary, and, in a moment, he would be free to return to his own affairs, which were the affairs of two continents.
This sluggishness on Colonel Pyncheon's part became still more unaccountable, when the second dignitary of the province made his appearance, and found no more ceremonious a reception.
So, although the order was fairly given out in Haley's hearing, and carried to Aunt Chloe by at least half a dozen juvenile messengers, that dignitary only gave certain very gruff snorts, and tosses of her head, and went on with every operation in an unusually leisurely and circumstantial manner.
There were many uncomplimentary references, on the walls, to a certain unpopular dignitary.
Their cravats were in general stiff, I thought, and their looks haughty; but in this last respect I presently conceived I had done them an injustice, for when two or three of them had to rise and answer a question of the presiding dignitary, I never saw anything more sheepish.
This was the time for Wemmick to produce a little kettle, a tray of glasses, and a black bottle with a porcelain-topped cork, representing some clerical dignitary of a rubicund and social aspect.
In defiance of conventual rules, and the edicts of popes and councils, the sleeves of this dignitary were lined and turned up with rich furs, his mantle secured at the throat with a golden clasp, and the whole dress proper to his order as much refined upon and ornamented, as that of a quaker beauty of the present day, who, while she retains the garb and costume of her sect continues to give to its simplicity, by the choice of materials and the mode of disposing them, a certain air of coquettish attraction, savouring but too much of the vanities of the world.
They did not care to take the trouble of disabusing him of his error, as they considered that since it did not in any way hurt his conscience it would be better to leave him in it, and they would have all the more amusement in listening to his simplicities; and so they bade him pray to God for his lord's health, as it was a very likely and a very feasible thing for him in course of time to come to be an emperor, as he said, or at least an archbishop or some other dignitary of equal rank.
See you not, he is some old round-headed dignitary, who hath lain asleep these thirty years, and knows nothing o' the change of times?
1825, to protect the fur trade, he held a conference with the Crow nation, at which Rose figured as Indian dignitary and Crow interpreter.
This dignitary proved to be an old sailor, by the name of John Young; who, after being tossed about the seas like another Sinbad, had, by one of the whimsical freaks of fortune, been elevated to the government of a savage island.
He is the chief dignitary of the borough, and the very pigs look up to him with a sentiment of reverence.