digression


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

di·gres·sion

 (dī-grĕsh′ən, dĭ-)
n.
1. The act of digressing.
2. An instance of digressing, especially a written or spoken passage that has no bearing on the main subject.

di·gres′sion·al adj.

digression

(daɪˈɡrɛʃən)
n
an act or instance of digressing from a main subject in speech or writing
diˈgressional adj

di•gres•sion

(dɪˈgrɛʃ ən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the act of digressing.
2. a passage or section that deviates from the central theme in speech or writing.
[1325–75; < Anglo-French < Latin]
di•gres′sion•al, di•gres′sion•ar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.digression - a message that departs from the main subjectdigression - a message that departs from the main subject
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
2.digression - a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern); "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"
turning, turn - the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right"
red herring - any diversion intended to distract attention from the main issue
3.digression - wandering from the main path of a journeydigression - wandering from the main path of a journey
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another

digression

digression

noun
Translations
إنْحِراف عن الموضوع، إسْتِطْراد
odbočkaodbočení
sidebemærkning
poikkeamapoikkeaminensyrjähyppy
elkalandozás
útúrdúr
konudan ayrılma

digression

[daɪˈgreʃən] Ndigresión f

digression

[daɪˈgrɛʃən] ndigression f

digression

nAbschweifung f, → Exkurs m; this by way of a digressionaber das nur nebenbei

digression

[daɪˈgrɛʃn] ndigressione f

digress

(daiˈgres) verb
to wander from the point, or from the main subject in speaking or writing.
diˈgression (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
But, to return from this digression, care ought to be taken that the bodies of the children may be such as will answer the expectations of the legislator; this also will be affected by the same means.
I suppose it was a very pretty example of the triumph of spirit over matter, and so my digression has at least the advantage of a moral.
Forgive, I pray you, this inconsequent digression by what was once a woman.
The gallant behaviour of Jones, and the more dreadful consequence of that behaviour to the young lady; with a short digression in favour of the female sex.
After this long digression we have now arrived once more at the point where Pudd'nhead Wilson, while waiting for the arrival of the twins on that same Friday evening, sat puzzling over the strange apparition of that morning--a girl in young Tom Driscoll's bedroom; fretting, and guessing, and puzzling over it, and wondering who the shameless creature might be.
Darya Alexandrovna noticed that at this point in his explanation he grew confused, and she did not quite understand this digression, but she felt that having once begun to speak of matters near his heart, of which he could not speak to Anna, he was now making a clean breast of everything, and that the question of his pursuits in the country fell into the same category of matters near his heart, as the question of his relations with Anna.
And while on this digression, let me repeat the question I have repeated to myself ten thousand times.
Nestor in a digression tells him how Epopeus was utterly destroyed after seducing the daughter of Lycus, and the story of Oedipus, the madness of Heracles, and the story of Theseus and Ariadne.
The great interest with which the important events lately occurring at the Sandwich, Marquesas, and Society Islands, have been regarded in America and England, and indeed throughout the world, will, he trusts, justify a few otherwise unwarrantable digressions.
Good taste will only pardon such digressions as bring him towards his end, and show it from a more striking point of view.
Peter), Martin (the Lutherans and the Church of England, named from Martin Luther), and Jack (the Dissenters, who followed John Calvin); but a great part of the book is made up of irrelevant introductions and digressions in which Swift ridicules various absurdities, literary and otherwise, among them the very practice of digressions.
Tender announced by THE USAID FAIR JUSTICE PROJECT, Ukraine under the project funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) for Production of film presentation of the Supreme Court of Ukraine digression on the history of the Court in the context of historical events in Ukraine, in particular, of proceedings.