digress

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Related to digressions: discretions

di·gress

(dī-grĕs′, dĭ-)
intr.v. di·gressed, di·gress·ing, di·gress·es
To stray temporarily from the topic at hand, as in delivering a speech or engaging in a discussion. See Synonyms at swerve.

[Latin dīgredī, dīgress- : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + gradī, to go; see ghredh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

digress

(daɪˈɡrɛs)
vb (intr)
1. to depart from the main subject in speech or writing
2. to wander from one's path or main direction
[C16: from Latin dīgressus turned aside, from dīgredī, from dis- apart + gradī to go]
diˈgresser n

di•gress

(dɪˈgrɛs, daɪ-)

v.i.
1. to wander away from the main topic or argument in speaking or writing.
2. Archaic. to turn aside.
[1520–30; < Latin dīgressus, past participle of dīgredī to go off, depart, digress =dī- di-2 + -gredī, comb. form of gradī to go; compare grade]
syn: See deviate.

digress


Past participle: digressed
Gerund: digressing

Imperative
digress
digress
Present
I digress
you digress
he/she/it digresses
we digress
you digress
they digress
Preterite
I digressed
you digressed
he/she/it digressed
we digressed
you digressed
they digressed
Present Continuous
I am digressing
you are digressing
he/she/it is digressing
we are digressing
you are digressing
they are digressing
Present Perfect
I have digressed
you have digressed
he/she/it has digressed
we have digressed
you have digressed
they have digressed
Past Continuous
I was digressing
you were digressing
he/she/it was digressing
we were digressing
you were digressing
they were digressing
Past Perfect
I had digressed
you had digressed
he/she/it had digressed
we had digressed
you had digressed
they had digressed
Future
I will digress
you will digress
he/she/it will digress
we will digress
you will digress
they will digress
Future Perfect
I will have digressed
you will have digressed
he/she/it will have digressed
we will have digressed
you will have digressed
they will have digressed
Future Continuous
I will be digressing
you will be digressing
he/she/it will be digressing
we will be digressing
you will be digressing
they will be digressing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been digressing
you have been digressing
he/she/it has been digressing
we have been digressing
you have been digressing
they have been digressing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
he/she/it will have been digressing
we will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
they will have been digressing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been digressing
you had been digressing
he/she/it had been digressing
we had been digressing
you had been digressing
they had been digressing
Conditional
I would digress
you would digress
he/she/it would digress
we would digress
you would digress
they would digress
Past Conditional
I would have digressed
you would have digressed
he/she/it would have digressed
we would have digressed
you would have digressed
they would have digressed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.digress - lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking; "She always digresses when telling a story"; "her mind wanders"; "Don't digress when you give a lecture"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
2.digress - wander from a direct or straight course
deviate, divert - turn aside; turn away from

digress

verb wander, drift, stray, depart, ramble, meander, diverge, deviate, turn aside, be diffuse, expatiate, go off at a tangent, get off the point or subject She digressed from the matter under discussion.

digress

verb
1. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
2. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
Translations
odbíhatodbočit
bevæge sig væk fra emnet
gera útúrdúr
novirzīties
konudan ayrılmak

digress

[daɪˈgres] VIhacer una digresión (pej) → divagar
to digress from the subjectapartarse del tema
but I digress (often hum) → pero me estoy apartando del tema

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi (= get off the subject) → faire une digression
to digress from sth [+ topic, subject] → s'écarter de qch, s'éloigner de qch

digress

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi to digress (from)divagare (da), fare digressioni (da)

digress

(daiˈgres) verb
to wander from the point, or from the main subject in speaking or writing.
diˈgression (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
Yet went she not, as not with such discourse Delighted, or not capable her eare Of what was high: such pleasure she reserv'd, ADAM relating, she sole Auditress; Her Husband the Relater she preferr'd Before the Angel, and of him to ask Chose rather; hee, she knew would intermix Grateful digressions, and solve high dispute With conjugal Caresses, from his Lip Not Words alone pleas'd her.
Then, like all persons living in solitude who are afflicted with an ever present and ever renewed grief, he related to the marquis at length the following narrative, which is here condensed, and relieved of the many digressions made by both the narrator and the listener.
Good taste will only pardon such digressions as bring him towards his end, and show it from a more striking point of view.
In describing to her all the grandeur of Lady Catherine and her mansion, with occasional digressions in praise of his own humble abode, and the improvements it was receiving, he was happily employed until the gentlemen joined them; and he found in Mrs.
The great interest with which the important events lately occurring at the Sandwich, Marquesas, and Society Islands, have been regarded in America and England, and indeed throughout the world, will, he trusts, justify a few otherwise unwarrantable digressions.
A great historian, as he insisted on calling himself, who had the happiness to be dead a hundred and twenty years ago, and so to take his place among the colossi whose huge legs our living pettiness is observed to walk under, glories in his copious remarks and digressions as the least imitable part of his work, and especially in those initial chapters to the successive books of his history, where he seems to bring his armchair to the proscenium and chat with us in all the lusty ease of his fine English.
One of them, a stout, excitable chap with black mustaches, informed me with great volubility and many digressions, as soon as I told him who I was, that my steamer was at the bottom of the river.
If I had time and dared to enter into digressions, I would write a chapter about that first pint of porter drunk upon English ground.
Yes,' said Sam; 'but that's nothin' if we could find out the young 'ooman;' and here Sam, with many digressions upon the personal beauty of Mary, and the unspeakable tortures he had experienced since he last saw her, gave a faithful account of Mr.
After this long digression we have now arrived once more at the point where Pudd'nhead Wilson, while waiting for the arrival of the twins on that same Friday evening, sat puzzling over the strange apparition of that morning--a girl in young Tom Driscoll's bedroom; fretting, and guessing, and puzzling over it, and wondering who the shameless creature might be.
And, making a digression at this stage on the subject of light, I expounded at considerable length what the nature of that light must be which is found in the sun and the stars, and how thence in an instant of time it traverses the immense spaces of the heavens, and how from the planets and comets it is reflected towards the earth.
Though it may rather be a digression from the immediate subject of this paper, I shall take occasion to mention here a supposition which has excited some alarm upon very mistaken grounds.