digs


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dig

 (dĭg)
v. dug (dŭg), dig·ging, digs
v.tr.
1. To break up, turn over, or remove (earth or sand, for example), as with a shovel, spade, or snout, or with claws, paws or hands.
2.
a. To make or form by removing earth or other material: dig a trench; dug my way out of the snow.
b. To prepare (soil) by loosening or cultivating.
3.
a. To obtain or unearth by digging: dig coal out of a seam; dug potatoes from a field.
b. To obtain or find by an action similar to digging: dug a dollar out of his pocket; dug the puck out of the corner.
4. To learn or discover by careful research or investigation: dug up the evidence; dug out the real facts.
5. To force down and into something; thrust: dug his foot in the ground.
6. To poke or prod: dug me in the ribs.
7. Sports To strike or redirect (a ball) just before it hits the ground, keeping it in play, as in tennis or volleyball.
8. Slang
a. To understand fully: Do you dig what I mean?
b. To like, enjoy, or appreciate: "They really dig our music and, daddy, I dig swinging for them" (Louis Armstrong).
c. To take notice of: Dig that wild outfit.
v.intr.
1. To loosen, turn over, or remove earth or other material.
2. To make one's way by or as if by pushing aside or removing material: dug through the files.
3. Slang To have understanding: Do you dig?
n.
1. A poke or thrust: a sharp dig in the ribs.
2. A sarcastic, taunting remark; a gibe.
3. An archaeological excavation.
4. Sports An act or an instance of digging a ball.
5. digs Lodgings.
Phrasal Verb:
dig in
1. To dig trenches for protection.
2. To hold on stubbornly, as to a position; entrench oneself.
3. To begin to work intensively.
4. To begin to eat heartily.
Idioms:
dig in (one's) heels
To resist opposition stubbornly; refuse to yield or compromise.
dig it out
Slang To run as fast as one can, especially as a base runner in baseball.

[Middle English diggen; perhaps akin to Old French digue, dike, trench; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language In its slang sense of "to enjoy," dig is one of the many words and expressions that come from African American Vernacular English. Like cool, it is first recorded in 1930s jazz circles. While several AAVE expressions that have entered colloquial American English from jazz still have musical associations, many others do not, and quite a few are so ordinary today that their origin in AAVE is not at all obvious. Some are no longer regarded as slang, such as badmouth, cakewalk, nitty-gritty, and main man. Others, like fox (sexy woman), gig, and chump change are still slang or informal. Of course, American slang has received terms from other musical genres besides jazz and rap. For instance, emo was first used for an often "emotional" genre of rock music originating in the 1980s, and has since been extended to mean "angst-filled, melancholy, or sad."

digs

(dɪɡz)
pl n
informal Brit lodgings
[C19: shortened from diggings, perhaps referring to where one digs or works, but see also dig in]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.digs - an excavation for ore or precious stones or for archaeology
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.digs - temporary living quartersdigs - temporary living quarters    
living quarters, quarters - housing available for people to live in; "he found quarters for his family"; "I visited his bachelor quarters"
Translations
kégli

digs

[dɪgz] NPL (Brit) → alojamiento msing
to be in digsestar alojado, vivir en una pensión, estar de patrona (o.f.)

digs

[ˈdɪgz] npl (British)chambre f meublée
to live in digs → vivre dans une chambre meublée

digs

pl (Brit) → Bude f (inf); to be or live in digsein möbliertes Zimmer or eine Bude (inf)haben

digs

[dɪgz] npl (Brit) (fam) to be in digsaffittare una camera (presso privati)
References in classic literature ?
But you can't dig forever; and what are you going to do then?
After such imaginary discourse, the passenger in his fancy would dig, and dig, dig--now with a spade, now with a great key, now with his hands--to dig this wretched creature out.
IT would be most an hour yet till breakfast, so we left and struck down into the woods; because Tom said we got to have SOME light to see how to dig by, and a lantern makes too much, and might get us into trouble; what we must have was a lot of them rotten chunks that's called fox-fire, and just makes a soft kind of a glow when you lay them in a dark place.
He would not believe the Parrot's words and began to dig away furiously at the earth.
A DOG that had seen a Physician attending the burial of a wealthy patient, said: "When do you expect to dig it up?
Once upon a time there was a Miser who used to hide his gold at the foot of a tree in his garden; but every week he used to go and dig it up and gloat over his gains.
THERE comes a time in every rightly- constructed boy's life when he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure.
I thought if I had a little spade I could dig somewhere as he does, and I might make a little garden if he would give me some seeds.
As it seemed reasonable to conclude that a man who had never been buried could not be unburied, the diggers gave him up when their task was done, and did not dig down for him into the depths of the earth.
We have, therefore, a well of sixty feet in diameter to dig down to a depth of nine hundred feet.
And it would dig and lay, and continue to dig and lay, while a black dug out its eggs within two or three feet of it.
He may get up in the night, dig up this city and skip with that golden image before we know it.