dyke

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dyke 1

 (dīk)
n. & v.
Variant of dike1.

dyke 2

 (dīk) also dike
n. Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for a lesbian.

[Origin unknown.]

dyke′y adj.

dyke

(daɪk) or

dike

n
1. (Civil Engineering) an embankment constructed to prevent flooding, keep out the sea, etc
2. (Civil Engineering) a ditch or watercourse
3. (Civil Engineering) a bank made of earth excavated for and placed alongside a ditch
4. (Civil Engineering) Scot a wall, esp a dry-stone wall
5. a barrier or obstruction
6. (Geological Science) a vertical or near-vertical wall-like body of igneous rock intruded into cracks in older rock
7. (Furniture) informal
a. a lavatory
b. (as modifier): a dyke roll.
vb
8. (Civil Engineering) civil engineering an embankment or wall built to confine a river to a particular course
9. (Civil Engineering) (tr) to protect, enclose, or drain (land) with a dyke
[C13: modification of Old English dic ditch; compare Old Norse dīki ditch]

dyke

(daɪk) or

dike

n
slang a lesbian
[C20: of unknown origin]

Dyke

(dɑɪk)
n
(Biography) Greg(ory). born 1947, British television executive; director-general of the BBC (2000–04)

dyke1

(daɪk)

n., v. dyked, dyk•ing.

dyke2

or dike

(daɪk)

n.
usage: This term is usually used with disparaging intent and perceived as insulting. However, it has been increasingly adopted as a preferred term by young or radical homosexuals and in the academic community. In the mainstream homosexual community, gay and lesbian remain the terms of choice.
n. Slang: Usually Disparaging and Offensive.
(a term used to refer to a female homosexual or lesbian.)
[1930–35; of uncertain origin]
dyke′y, adj.

dyke


Past participle: dyked
Gerund: dyking

Imperative
dyke
dyke
Present
I dyke
you dyke
he/she/it dykes
we dyke
you dyke
they dyke
Preterite
I dyked
you dyked
he/she/it dyked
we dyked
you dyked
they dyked
Present Continuous
I am dyking
you are dyking
he/she/it is dyking
we are dyking
you are dyking
they are dyking
Present Perfect
I have dyked
you have dyked
he/she/it has dyked
we have dyked
you have dyked
they have dyked
Past Continuous
I was dyking
you were dyking
he/she/it was dyking
we were dyking
you were dyking
they were dyking
Past Perfect
I had dyked
you had dyked
he/she/it had dyked
we had dyked
you had dyked
they had dyked
Future
I will dyke
you will dyke
he/she/it will dyke
we will dyke
you will dyke
they will dyke
Future Perfect
I will have dyked
you will have dyked
he/she/it will have dyked
we will have dyked
you will have dyked
they will have dyked
Future Continuous
I will be dyking
you will be dyking
he/she/it will be dyking
we will be dyking
you will be dyking
they will be dyking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dyking
you have been dyking
he/she/it has been dyking
we have been dyking
you have been dyking
they have been dyking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dyking
you will have been dyking
he/she/it will have been dyking
we will have been dyking
you will have been dyking
they will have been dyking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dyking
you had been dyking
he/she/it had been dyking
we had been dyking
you had been dyking
they had been dyking
Conditional
I would dyke
you would dyke
he/she/it would dyke
we would dyke
you would dyke
they would dyke
Past Conditional
I would have dyked
you would have dyked
he/she/it would have dyked
we would have dyked
you would have dyked
they would have dyked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dyke - (slang) offensive term for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
gay woman, lesbian, tribade - a female homosexual
2.dyke - a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
milldam - dam to make a millpond to provide power for a water mill
weir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flow
Verb1.dyke - enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"

dyke

noun wall, barrier, dam, enclosure, palisade I then slid down the side of the dyke.
Translations
hráz
dæmningdige
lesbo
flóîgarîur, stíflugarîur
aizsprostsdambis
hrádza
flata
bentset

dyke

[daɪk] N
1. (= barrier) → dique m; (= channel) → canal m, acequia f; (= causeway) → calzada f; (= embankment) → terraplén m
2. (= lesbian) → tortillera f

dyke

[ˈdaɪk] n (= embankment) → digue f

dyke

, (US) dike
n
(= channel)(Entwässerungs)graben m, → Kanal m
(= barrier)Deich m, → Damm m; (= causeway)Fahrdamm m
(sl: = lesbian) → Lesbe f (inf)
vt landeindeichen; rivereindämmen

dyke

[daɪk] n
a. (barrier) → diga, argine m; (channel) → canale m di scolo; (causeway) → sentiero rialzato
b. (offensive) (lesbian) → lesbica

dyke,

dike

(daik) noun
an embankment built as a barrier against the sea etc.
References in classic literature ?
Be careful of the dikes," the station-master advised him.
More than once where the dikes had overflown he was compelled to change his course, but he arrived at last at the little ridge of pebbled beach bordering the sea.
to, with his dikes and erigations, if there's any law to be brought to bear o' the right side.
I say it's common sense, as Pivart's dikes must do me an injury.
On either side were dikes full of water bordered by osiers, and far away in the distance stood the towers of Emmet Priory with tall poplar trees around.
So thus the band journeyed along the causeway between the dikes, till at last they reached the great gate of Emmet Priory.
I took it to be rain, but it turned out to be only the murmur of the restless Neckar, tumbling over her dikes and dams far below, in the gorge.
About halfway across the heath there had been a wide dike recently cut, and the earth from the cutting was cast up roughly on the other side.
It was an empty house which had been torn down by the gunpowder, and the grim old colour sergeant of the war was still teaching discipline to the miners of Iron Dike.
I remember the remains of one upon an island in a small lake near Lerwick, which at high tide communicates with the sea, the access to which is very ingenious, by means of a causeway or dike, about three or four inches under the surface of the water.
Among those were Major Loder (unattached), and Captain Rook (late of the Rifles), who might be seen any day on the Dike, smoking and staring at the women, and who speedily got an introduction to the hospitable board and select circle of Mr.
The first fragment of their earthly possessions is a low natural dike of shingle, surmounted by a public path which runs parallel with the sea.