diligent


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dil·i·gent

 (dĭl′ə-jənt)
adj.
Marked by persevering, painstaking effort.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dīligēns, dīligent-, present participle of dīligere, to esteem, love : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + legere, to choose; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

dil′i·gent·ly adv.
Synonyms: diligent, industrious, conscientious, assiduous, sedulous
These adjectives suggest steady attention and effort that is undertaken to accomplish something. Diligent connotes steady, meticulous attention to an ongoing job or task: "[They] have won international renown for their diligent efforts to track down software bugs" (Hiawatha Bray).
Industrious implies energetic and productive application, often to a large or important endeavor: "Madison's and Jefferson's vision of an agrarian republic made up largely of industrious farmers who marketed their burgeoning surpluses abroad" (Drew R. McCoy).
Conscientious carries with it the implication of energetic attentiveness springing from dutifulness or a sense of responsibility: "a studious, conscientious public servant authentically dedicated to improving the welfare of his fellow human beings" (Randall Bennett Woods).
Assiduous and the less common sedulous emphasize untiring exertion and an earnestness of purpose: "How do Olympians acquire [talent]? Were they born with it, or did they develop it through assiduous practice?" (Steve Olson). "the sedulous pursuit of legal and moral principles" (Ernest van den Haag).

diligent

(ˈdɪlɪdʒənt)
adj
1. careful and persevering in carrying out tasks or duties
2. carried out with care and perseverance: diligent work.
[C14: from Old French, from Latin dīligere to value, from dis- apart + legere to read]
ˈdiligently adv

dil•i•gent

(ˈdɪl ɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. constant and earnest in effort and application; attentive and persistent in doing something: a diligent student.
2. done or pursued with persevering attention; painstaking: a diligent search.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīligent-, s. of dīligēns, present participle of dīligere to choose, like]
dil′i•gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.diligent - quietly and steadily persevering especially in detail or exactness; "a diligent (or patient) worker"; "with persevering (or patient) industry she revived the failing business"
patient - enduring trying circumstances with even temper or characterized by such endurance; "a patient smile"; "was patient with the children"; "an exact and patient scientist"; "please be patient"
2.diligent - characterized by care and perseverance in carrying out tasks; "a diligent detective investigates all clues"; "a diligent search of the files"
busy - actively or fully engaged or occupied; "busy with her work"; "a busy man"; "too busy to eat lunch"
careful - exercising caution or showing care or attention; "they were careful when crossing the busy street"; "be careful to keep her shoes clean"; "did very careful research"; "careful art restorers"; "careful of the rights of others"; "careful about one's behavior"
negligent - characterized by neglect and undue lack of concern; "negligent parents"; "negligent of detail"; "negligent in his correspondence"

diligent

diligent

adjective
Characterized by steady attention and effort:
Translations
مُجْتَهِد
pilnýpracovitý
flittigomhyggelig
iîinn
čaklscentīgsuzcītīgs
marljiv
çalışkangayretli

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒənt] ADJ [person] → diligente; [work, search] → concienzudo

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒənt] adj [worker, student] → appliqué(e), assidu(e); [work] → assidu(e)

diligent

adj person (in work etc) → fleißig; (= keen)eifrig; search, worksorgfältig, genau; to be diligent in doing somethingetw eifrig tun

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒnt] adj (person) → diligente, attento/a; (work, search) → accurato/a, diligente

diligent

(ˈdilidʒənt) adjective
conscientious; hardworking. a diligent student.
ˈdiligently adverb
ˈdiligence noun
References in classic literature ?
Even so," replied the stranger, making diligent use of his triangular castor, to produce a circulation in the close air of the woods, and leaving his hearers in doubt to which of the young man's questions he responded; when, however, he had cooled his face, and recovered his breath, he continued, "I hear you are riding to William Henry; as I am journeying thitherward myself, I concluded good company would seem consistent to the wishes of both parties.
An inquiry was set on foot, and after diligent investigation they came upon his traces.
On one side hung a very large oil-painting so thoroughly besmoked, and every way defaced, that in the unequal cross-lights by which you viewed it, it was only by diligent study and a series of systematic visits to it, and careful inquiry of the neighbors, that you could any way arrive at an understanding of its purpose.
For, thought Ahab, while even the highest earthly felicities ever have a certain unsignifying pettiness lurking in them, but, at bottom, all heart-woes, a mystic significance, and, in some men, an archangelic grandeur; so do their diligent tracings-out not belie the obvious deduction.
She was more diligent in teaching Topsy,--taught her mainly from the Bible,--did not any longer shrink from her touch, or manifest an ill-repressed disgust, because she felt none.
We only had one brief little season of heaven and heaven's sweet ecstasy and peace during all this long and diligent and acrimonious reproduction of the other place.
It grati- fied all the vicious vanity that was in him; and so, instead of winning him, it only "set him up" the more and made him the more diligent to avoid betraying that he knew she was about.
I watch your career with interest, because I consider you a specimen of a diligent, orderly, energetic woman: not because I deeply compassionate what you have gone through, or what you still suffer.
Micawber was a diligent and esteemed correspondent of that journal.
Such strange lingering echoes of the old demon-worship might perhaps even now be caught by the diligent listener among the grey-haired peasantry; for the rude mind with difficulty associates the ideas of power and benignity.
Next morning I was afoot early, bent on my quest in right good earnest; for I had a remorseful feeling that I had not been sufficiently diligent the day before, had spent too much time in dreaming and moralising, in which opinion I am afraid the reader will agree.
I would gladly have taken a dozen of the natives, but this was a thing the emperor would by no means permit; and, besides a diligent search into my pockets, his majesty engaged my honour "not to carry away any of his subjects, although with their own consent and desire.