diminutive


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di·min·u·tive

 (dĭ-mĭn′yə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Extremely or extraordinarily small. See Synonyms at small.
2. Grammar Of or being a suffix that indicates smallness or, by semantic extension, qualities such as youth, familiarity, affection, or contempt, as -let in booklet, -kin in lambkin, or -et in nymphet.
n.
1. Grammar A diminutive suffix, word, or name.
2. A very small person or thing.

[Middle English diminutif, from Old French, from Latin dīminūtīvus, from dīminūtus, past participle of dīminuere; see diminish.]

di·min′u·tive·ly adv.
di·min′u·tive·ness n.

diminutive

(dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv)
adj
1. very small; tiny
2. (Linguistics) grammar
a. denoting an affix added to a word to convey the meaning small or unimportant or to express affection, as for example the suffix -ette in French
b. denoting a word formed by the addition of a diminutive affix
n
3. (Grammar) grammar a diminutive word or affix
4. a tiny person or thing
Compare (for senses 2, 3): augmentative
diminutival adj
diˈminutively adv
diˈminutiveness n

di•min•u•tive

(dɪˈmɪn yə tɪv)

adj.
1. much smaller than the average or usual; tiny.
2. pertaining to or productive of a form denoting smallness, familiarity, affection, or triviality, as the suffix -let in droplet from drop.
n.
3. a diminutive element or formation.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin dīminūtīvus= Latin dīminūt(us) lessened (for dēminūtus; see diminution) + -īvus -ive]
di•min′u•tive•ly, adv.
di•min′u•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diminutive - a word that is formed with a suffix (such as -let or -kin) to indicate smallness
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.diminutive - very smalldiminutive - very small; "diminutive in stature"; "a lilliputian chest of drawers"; "her petite figure"; "tiny feet"; "the flyspeck nation of Bahrain moved toward democracy"
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"

diminutive

adjective small, little, tiny, minute, pocket(-sized), mini, wee, miniature, petite, midget, undersized, teeny-weeny, Lilliputian, bantam, teensy-weensy, pygmy or pigmy a diminutive figure stood at the entrance
big, great, giant, massive (informal), enormous, immense, jumbo (informal), gigantic, colossal, king-size

diminutive

adjective
Translations
شَديد الصِّغَر
drobnýmaličkýzdrobnělina
diminutivmeget lille
diminutiivimitätönpienentääpikkuruinenvähäinen
deminutivumanjenica
pöttöm
agnarlítill, örsmár
diminutiefkleinverkleinendverkleinwoord
drobnýmaličkýzdrobnenina

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
A. ADJ
1. (= very small) → diminuto
2. (Ling) → diminutivo
B. N (Ling) → diminutivo m

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
adj (= very small) → minuscule, tout(e) petit(e)
n (= shortened form) [word, name] → diminutif m

diminutive

adjwinzig, klein; (Gram) → diminutiv
n (Gram) → Verkleinerungsform f, → Diminutiv(um) nt; (of name)Kurzform f

diminutive

[dɪˈmɪnjʊtɪv]
1. adj (frm) → minuto/a, minuscolo/a
2. n (Gram) → diminutivo

diminution

(dimiˈnjuːʃən) noun
lessening. a diminution in the birth rate.
diminutive (diˈminjutiv) adjective
very small. a diminutive child.

diminutive

n. diminutivo;
a. diminuto-a, pequeño-a.
References in classic literature ?
The equipages are as varied as the company and attract as much attention, especially the low basket barouches in which ladies drive themselves, with a pair of dashing ponies, gay nets to keep their voluminous flounces from overflowing the diminutive vehicles, and little grooms on the perch behind.
She had possession of the rocker, and she was busily engaged in sewing upon a diminutive pair of night-drawers.
That afternoon Phoebe found a diminutive egg,--not in the regular nest, it was far too precious to be trusted there,--but cunningly hidden under the currant-bushes, on some dry stalks of last year's grass.
However, in my thoughts I could not sufficiently wonder at the intrepidity of these diminutive mortals, who durst venture to mount and walk upon my body, while one of my hands was at liberty, without trembling at the very sight of so prodigious a creature as I must appear to them.
She opened it, and out came a diminutive hall porter at whose belt hung a tiny chain, at the end of which was a golden key half as long as the smallest pin you ever saw.
The tables being removed, suddenly through the door of the hall there will enter a hideous and diminutive dwarf followed by a fair dame, between two giants, who comes with a certain adventure, the work of an ancient sage; and he who shall achieve it shall be deemed the best knight in the world.
The lower strata of the middle class -- the small tradespeople, shopkeepers, retired tradesmen generally, the handicraftsmen and peasants -- all these sink gradually into the proletariat, partly because their diminutive capital does not suffice for the scale on which Modern Industry is carried on, and is swamped in the competition with the large capitalists, partly because their specialized skill is rendered worthless by the new methods of production.
Fogg and Aouda, installing themselves at a table, were abundantly served on diminutive plates by negroes of darkest hue.
The diminutive Abbe Scarron, who, however, was an abbe only because he owned an abbey, and not because he was in orders, had formerly been one of the gayest prebendaries in the town of Mans, which he inhabited.
In the present game, the object hidden, or the cache as it is called by the trappers, is a small splint of wood, or other diminutive article that may be concealed in the closed hand.
Her feet, though wholly exposed, were as diminutive and fairly shaped as those which peep from beneath the skirts of a Lima lady's dress.
You were remarking to yourself that his diminutive figure unfitted him for tragedy.