diminutively


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di·min·u·tive

 (dĭ-mĭn′yə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Extremely or extraordinarily small. See Synonyms at small.
2. Grammar Of or being a suffix that indicates smallness or, by semantic extension, qualities such as youth, familiarity, affection, or contempt, as -let in booklet, -kin in lambkin, or -et in nymphet.
n.
1. Grammar A diminutive suffix, word, or name.
2. A very small person or thing.

[Middle English diminutif, from Old French, from Latin dīminūtīvus, from dīminūtus, past participle of dīminuere; see diminish.]

di·min′u·tive·ly adv.
di·min′u·tive·ness n.
Translations
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
If, however, Bon-Bon was barely three feet in height, and if his head was diminutively small, still it was impossible to behold the rotundity of his stomach without a sense of magnificence nearly bordering upon the sublime.
Where she towers in height with her slim straight body, her husband Oko, appears diminutively short beside her.
When specimen is loaded (100 MPa and 200 MPa) and tempered at 200[degrees]C, it humps nevertheless but the more diminutively the higher stress are (Fig.