dingy


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Related to dingy: dengue fever, thesaurus

din·gy 1

 (dĭn′jē)
adj. din·gi·er, din·gi·est
1. Darkened with smoke or grime.
2. Shabby, drab, or squalid.

[Possibly from Middle English dinge, dung, variant of dung; see dung.]

din′gi·ly adv.
din′gi·ness n.

ding·y 2

 (dĭng′ē)
adj. Slang
Mentally deranged; crazy.

[ding + -y.]

dingy

(ˈdɪndʒɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
1. lacking light or brightness; drab
2. dirty; discoloured
[C18: perhaps from an earlier dialect word related to Old English dynge dung]
ˈdingily adv
ˈdinginess n

dingy

(ˈdɪŋɪ)
vb, pl -gies, -gying or -gied
(tr) slang Brit to ignore (a person) or avoid (an event)

din•gy

(ˈdɪn dʒi)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
1. of a dark, dull, or dirty color or aspect; lacking brightness or freshness.
2. shabby; dismal.
[1730–40; orig. uncertain]
din′gi•ly, adv.
din′gi•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dingy - thickly covered with ingrained dirt or sootdingy - thickly covered with ingrained dirt or soot; "a miner's begrimed face"; "dingy linen"; "grimy hands"; "grubby little fingers"; "a grungy kitchen"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"
2.dingy - (of color) discolored by impurities; not bright and clear; "dirty" is often used in combination; "a dirty (or dingy) white"; "the muddied grey of the sea"; "muddy colors"; "dirty-green walls"; "dirty-blonde hair"
impure - combined with extraneous elements
3.dingy - causing dejection; "a blue day"; "the dark days of the war"; "a week of rainy depressing weather"; "a disconsolate winter landscape"; "the first dismal dispiriting days of November"; "a dark gloomy day"; "grim rainy weather"
cheerless, depressing, uncheerful - causing sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy; "the economic outlook is depressing"; "something cheerless about the room"; "a moody and uncheerful person"; "an uncheerful place"

dingy

adjective
1. dull, dark, dim, gloomy, murky, dreary, sombre, drab, colourless, dusky, bedimmed He took me to his rather dingy office.
2. discoloured, soiled, dirty, shabby, faded, seedy, grimy wallpaper with dingy yellow stripes

dingy

adjective
Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations
قَذِر، كامِد
špinavýzašlý
snavsettrist
skítugur; grámuskulegur
apsmurgęsapsmurgimasnutriušęs
nokvēpisnoputējisnotraipīts
ošumelý
izbe gibikasvetli

dingy

[ˈdɪndʒɪ] ADJ (dingier (compar) (dingiest (superl))) (= shabby) [furniture, decor] → deslustrado, deslucido; (= gloomy) [town, house, room] → sombrío, lóbrego; (= dirty) → sucio

dingy

[ˈdɪndʒi] adj [room, furnishings] → miteux/euse, minabledining area n (in room)coin m repas
the main dining area [restaurant] → la salle de restaurant principaledining car n (British)wagon-restaurant mdining chair nchaise f de salle à mangerdining hall nréfectoire mdining kitchen ncuisine f avec coin repasdining room n (in house)salle f à manger; (in hotel)salle f de restaurantdining room suite nsalle f à manger, ensemble m de salle à mangerdining table dining-table ntable f de la salle à manger

ding(e)y

, dinghy
nDing(h)i nt; (collapsible) → Schlauchboot nt

dingy

1
adj (+er) building, room, street, areadüster; (= dirty)schmuddelig; colourschmutzig; wallpaper with dingy yellow stripesTapeten mit schmutzig gelben Streifen

dingy

[ˈdɪn(d)ʒɪ] adj (shabby) → squallido/a; (dark) → scuro/a, tetro/a

dingy

(ˈdindʒi) adjective
dull; faded and dirty-looking. This room is so dingy.
ˈdinginess noun
References in classic literature ?
It was there also that she ate, keeping her belongings in a rare old buffet, dingy and battered from a hundred years of use.
Goodworthy led Philip through the dingy office, where now six or eight clerks were working, into a narrow room behind.
But she would mar his pleasure: she would go in her dingy rags, with her faded face, once as handsome as the best, with her little child that had its father's hair and eyes, and disclose herself to the Squire as his eldest son's wife.
Every one chattered, argued, discussed, disputed, applauded, from the gentleman lounging upon the barroom settee with his tumbler of sherry-cobbler before him down to the waterman who got drunk upon his "knock-me-down" in the dingy taverns of Fell Point.
Those dingy, fire-warmed, used-up, green-tinted, ill-natured souls--how COULD their envy endure my happiness!
Here and there would be a bridge crossing a filthy creek, with hard-baked mud shores and dingy sheds and docks along it; here and there would be a railroad crossing, with a tangle of switches, and locomotives puffing, and rattling freight cars filing by; here and there would be a great factory, a dingy building with innumerable windows in it, and immense volumes of smoke pouring from the chimneys, darkening the air above and making filthy the earth beneath.
His son obeyed, and the crowd approached; they were bawling and hissing round a dingy hearse and dingy mourning coach, in which mourning coach there was only one mourner, dressed in the dingy trappings that were considered essential to the dignity of the position.
Giry, in her faded shawl, her worn shoes, her old taffeta dress and dingy bonnet.
Yet far be it from me to profane the memory of that little dingy room
How different is this marvel observed from a raft, from what it is when one observes it through the dingy windows of a railway-station in some wretched village while he munches a petrified sandwich and waits for the train.
At the end of the yard a dark mass, tinted with a dingy blue by the morning dawn, rose before him, its dark outlines standing out in contrast to the houses already illuminated by the pale light of early morning.
Some faint attempts she had made with blue ribbon, to freshen the appearance of a dingy curtain, she now saw to be piteous.