dinosaur


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di·no·saur

 (dī′nə-sôr′)
n.
1.
a. Any of various extinct terrestrial reptiles of the orders Saurischia and Ornithischia that existed during the Mesozoic Era, including both carnivores and herbivores and often reaching a gigantic size.
b. Any of various other large extinct reptiles, such as an ichthyosaur.
2. A relic of the past: "living dinosaurs of the world of vegetation" (John Olmsted).
3. One that is hopelessly outmoded or unwieldy: "The old, big-city teaching hospital is a dinosaur" (Peggy Breault).

[New Latin Dīnosauria, group name, from Dīnosaurus, former genus name : Greek deinos, monstrous + Greek sauros, lizard.]

di′no·saur′i·an (-sôr′ē-ən) n. & adj.
di′no·sau′ric (-sôr′ĭk) adj.

dinosaur

(ˈdaɪnəˌsɔː)
n
1. (Palaeontology) any extinct terrestrial reptile of the orders Saurischia and Ornithischia, many of which were of gigantic size and abundant in the Mesozoic era. See also saurischian, ornithischian Compare pterosaur, plesiosaur
2. a person or thing that is considered to be out of date
[C19: from New Latin dinosaurus, from Greek deinos fearful + sauros lizard]
ˌdinoˈsaurian adj

di•no•saur

art at Dior
(ˈdaɪ nəˌsɔr)

n.
1. any herbivorous or carnivorous reptile of the extinct orders Saurischia and Ornithischia, of the Mesozoic Era: some were the largest known land animals.
2. something that is unwieldy, outmoded, or unable to adapt to change.
[< New Latin Dinosaurus (1841), orig. a genus name]
di`no•sau′ri•an, adj.

di·no·saur

(dī′nə-sôr′)
Any of various extinct reptiles that lived mainly during the Mesozoic Era. Dinosaurs were meat-eating or plant-eating, dwelled mostly on land, and varied from the size of a small dog to the largest land animals that ever lived. See more at ornithischian, saurischian. See Note at bird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dinosaur - any of numerous extinct terrestrial reptiles of the Mesozoic eradinosaur - any of numerous extinct terrestrial reptiles of the Mesozoic era
archosaur, archosaurian, archosaurian reptile - extinct reptiles including: dinosaurs; plesiosaurs; pterosaurs; ichthyosaurs; thecodonts
ornithischian, ornithischian dinosaur - herbivorous dinosaur with a pelvis like that of a bird
iguanodon - massive herbivorous bipedal dinosaur with a long heavy tail; common in Europe and northern Africa; early Cretaceous period
saurischian, saurischian dinosaur - herbivorous or carnivorous dinosaur having a three-pronged pelvis like that of a crocodile
diplodocus - a huge quadrupedal herbivore with long neck and tail; of late Jurassic in western North America
titanosaur, titanosaurian - amphibious quadrupedal herbivorous dinosaur with a long thin neck and whiplike tail; of the Cretaceous mostly in the southern hemisphere
argentinosaur - huge herbivorous dinosaur of Cretaceous found in Argentina
ground-shaker, seismosaur - huge herbivorous dinosaur of the Cretaceous found in western North America

dinosaur

noun fuddy-duddy, anachronism, dodo (informal), stick-in-the-mud (informal), antique (informal), fossil (informal), relic (informal), fogy or fogey, back number (informal) Such companies are industrial dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs

allosaur(us), ankylosaur(us), apatosaur(us), atlantosaur(us), brachiosaur(us), brontosaur(us), ceratosaur(us), compsognathus, dimetrodon, diplodocus, dolichosaur(us), dromiosaur(us), elasmosaur(us), hadrosaur(us), ichthyosaur(us), iguanodon or iguanodont, megalosaur(us), mosasaur(us), oviraptor, plesiosaur(us), pteranodon, pterodactyl or pterosaur, protoceratops, stegodon or stegodont, stegosaur(us), theropod, titanosaur(us), trachodon, triceratops, tyrannosaur(us), velociraptor
Translations
ديناصورديناصُور
dinosaurus
dinosaurdinosaurus
dinosaurus
dinosaurushirmulisko
dinosaur
dinoszaurusz
risaeîla
恐竜
공룡
dinozauras
dinozaurs
dinosaurus
dinozaver
dinosaurie
ไดโนเสาร์
dinozordinazor
динозавр
con khủng long

dinosaur

[ˈdaɪnəsɔːʳ] N
1. (= reptile) → dinosaurio m
2. (= old-fashioned person) → carcamal mf; (= old-fashioned organization) → reliquia f del pasado

dinosaur

[ˈdaɪnəsɔːr] n
(= animal) → dinosaure m
(= obsolete organization) → dinosaure m

dinosaur

nDinosaurier m

dinosaur

[ˈdaɪnəsɔːʳ] ndinosauro

dinosaur

(ˈdainəsoː) noun
any of several types of extinct giant reptile.

dinosaur

ديناصُور dinosaurus dinosaur Dinosaurier δεινόσαυρος dinosaurio dinosaurus dinosaure dinosaur dinosauro 恐竜 공룡 dinosaurus dinosaur dinozaur dinossauro динозавр dinosaurie ไดโนเสาร์ dinozor con khủng long 恐龙
References in classic literature ?
The inscription beneath it runs: `Probable appearance in life of the Jurassic Dinosaur Stegosaurus.
This is the tale of Bradley after he left Fort Dinosaur upon the west coast of the great lake that is in the center of the island.
Through the heavy Caspakian air, beneath the swollen sun, the five men marched northwest from Fort Dinosaur, now waist-deep in lush, jungle grasses starred with myriad gorgeous blooms, now across open meadow-land and parklike expanses and again plunging into dense forests of eucalyptus and acacia and giant arboreous ferns with feathered fronds waving gently a hundred feet above their heads.
According to the best of his calculations they had made sufficient easting during the past two days to have brought them to a point almost directly north of Fort Dinosaur and as nothing could be gained by retracing their steps along the base of the cliffs he decided to strike due south through the unexplored country between them and the fort.
To the best of Bradley's reckoning they were some twenty-five miles north of Fort Dinosaur, and that they might reach the fort on the following day, they plodded on until darkness overtook them.
They did not discuss it--they did not even mention it--yet all day long the thing was uppermost in the mind of each and mingled with it a similar picture with himself as victim should they fail to make Fort Dinosaur before dark.
The landscape was familiar--each recognized it immediately and knew that that smoky column marked the spot where Dinosaur had stood.
It was almost in a frenzy of fear that they broke through the final fringe of jungle and stood at last upon the verge of the open meadow a half-mile from Fort Dinosaur.
Brady trembled like a leaf as he crossed himself and gave silent thanks, for there before them stood the sturdy ramparts of Dinosaur and from inside the inclosure rose a thin spiral of smoke that marked the location of the cook-house.
Within hailing distance they set up such a loud shouting that presently heads appeared above the top of the parapet and soon answering shouts were rising from within Fort Dinosaur.
Now when we are attacked by large flying reptiles we run beneath spreading trees; when land carnivora threaten us, we climb into trees, and we have learned not to fire at any of the dinosaurs unless we can keep out of their reach for at least two minutes after hitting them in the brain or spine, or five minutes after puncturing their hearts--it takes them so long to die.
I can visualize the entire scene--the apelike Grimaldi men huddled in their filthy caves; the huge pterodactyls soaring through the heavy air upon their bat-like wings; the mighty dinosaurs moving their clumsy hulks beneath the dark shadows of preglacial forests--the dragons which we considered myths until science taught us that they were the true recollections of the first man, handed down through countless ages by word of mouth from father to son out of the unrecorded dawn of humanity.