diocese


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di·o·cese

 (dī′ə-sĭs, -sēs′, -sēz′)
n.
The district or churches under the jurisdiction of a bishop; a bishopric.

[Middle English diocise, from Old French, from Late Latin diocēsis, from Latin dioecēsis, jurisdiction, from Greek dioikēsis, administration, from dioikein, to keep house, administer : dia-, intensive pref.; see dia- + oikein, to inhabit (from oikos, house; see weik- in Indo-European roots).]

diocese

(ˈdaɪəsɪs)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the district under the jurisdiction of a bishop
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin diocēsis, from Greek dioikēsis administration, from dioikein to manage a household, from oikos house]

di•o•cese

(ˈdaɪ ə sɪs, -ˌsiz, -ˌsis)

n.
a district under the jurisdiction of a bishop.
[1300–50; Middle English diocise, diocese < Anglo-French < Late Latin diocēsis, variant of Late Latin, Latin dioecēsis, < Greek dioíkēsis housekeeping, administration, diocese =dioikē-, variant s. of dioikeîn to keep house, administer]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diocese - the territorial jurisdiction of a bishopdiocese - the territorial jurisdiction of a bishop
archdiocese - the diocese of an archbishop
exarchate, eparchy - a diocese of the Eastern Orthodox Church
see - the seat within a bishop's diocese where his cathedral is located
jurisdiction - in law; the territory within which power can be exercised
parish - the local subdivision of a diocese committed to one pastor

diocese

noun bishopric, see parishioners of the bishop's diocese
Translations
أبْرَشِيَّه
diecéze
bispedømmestift
episkopujo
hiippakunta
egyházmegye
biskupsdæmi
教区
vyskupystė
bīskapija
diecéza
piskoposluk bölgesi

diocese

[ˈdaɪəsɪs] Ndiócesis f inv

diocese

[ˈdaɪəsɪs] ndiocèse m

diocese

nDiözese f, → Bistum nt

diocese

[ˈdaɪəsɪs] ndiocesi f inv

diocese

(ˈdaiəsis) noun
the district over which a bishop has authority.
References in classic literature ?
The bishop of the diocese, an arrogant scion of the great nobility, claimed the girl's estate on the ground that she had married privately, and thus had cheated the Church out of one of its rights as lord of the seigniory -- the one heretofore referred to as le droit du seigneur.
That, perhaps, in short, this Prerogative Office of the diocese of Canterbury was altogether such a pestilent job, and such a pernicious absurdity, that but for its being squeezed away in a corner of St.
Friend Prior,'' returned the Hermit, ``you are to know that I belong to a little diocese, where I am my own diocesan, and care as little for the Bishop of York as I do for the Abbot of Jorvaulx, the Prior, and all the convent.
The abbe died when orthodoxy thus expired in the diocese.
Although her sins might have been proclaimed throughout the diocese without any shame to herself, or ill effects to the community, the cure thought it advisable to receive her confession in the vestry-room.
Ah, monsieur," said Bazin, with dignity, "monseigneur is at his diocese.
There his wife, nearly twenty-six years ago, had broken to him, with a blushing circumlocution that would have caused the young women of the new generation to smile, the news that she was to have a child; and there their eldest boy, Dallas, too delicate to be taken to church in midwinter, had been christened by their old friend the Bishop of New York, the ample magnificent irreplaceable Bishop, so long the pride and ornament of his diocese.
I came in fear and trembling to ask for a very small cheque for my dear brother's diocese.
Stelling's doctrine was of no particular school; if anything, it had a tinge of evangelicalism, for that was "the telling thing" just then in the diocese to which King's Lorton belonged.
Time, patience, and zeal, however, removed every impediment, and the venerable men who had been set apart by the American churches at length returned to their expecting dioceses, endowed with the most elevated functions of their earthly church.
was breaking with the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Los Angeles.
In February, a grand jury investigation charged the Diocese of Rockville Centre, New York with protecting 58 sexually abusive priests through what it called a "sham" policy designed to protect the church's reputation and minimize payouts to victims.