dipping


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Related to dipping: double dipping, hot dipping

dip

 (dĭp)
v. dipped, dip·ping, dips
v.tr.
1. To plunge briefly into a liquid, as in order to wet, coat, or saturate.
2. To color or dye by immersing: dip Easter eggs.
3. To immerse (a sheep or other animal) in a disinfectant solution.
4. To form (a candle) by repeatedly immersing a wick in melted wax or tallow.
5. To galvanize or plate (metal) by immersion.
6. To scoop up by plunging the hand or a receptacle below the surface, as of a liquid; ladle: dip water out of a bucket.
7. To lower and raise (a flag) in salute.
8. To lower or drop (something) suddenly: dipped my head to avoid the branch.
9. Slang To pick the pockets of.
v.intr.
1. To plunge into water or other liquid and come out quickly.
2. To plunge the hand or a receptacle into liquid or a container, especially so as to take something up or out: I dipped into my pocket for some coins.
3. To withdraw a small amount from a fund: We dipped into our savings.
4. To drop down or sink out of sight suddenly: The sun dipped below the horizon.
5. To drop suddenly before climbing. Used of an aircraft.
6. To slope downward; decline: The road dipped.
7. To decline slightly and usually temporarily: Sales dipped after Christmas.
8. Geology To lie at an angle to the horizontal plane, as a rock stratum or vein.
9.
a. To read here and there at random; browse: dipping into Chaucer.
b. To investigate a subject superficially; dabble: dipped into psychology.
10. Slang To steal by picking pockets.
11. To place a preparation of finely shredded tobacco in one's mouth.
n.
1. A brief plunge or immersion, especially a quick swim.
2. A liquid into which something is dipped, as for dyeing or disinfecting.
3. A savory creamy mixture into which crackers, raw vegetables, or other foods may be dipped.
4. An amount taken up by dipping.
5. A container for dipping.
6. A candle made by repeated dipping in tallow or wax.
7. A downward slope; a decline.
8. A sharp downward course; a drop: a dip in prices.
9. Geology The downward inclination of a rock stratum or vein in reference to the plane of the horizon.
10.
a. Linguistics A part of a phrase or sentence that is unstressed or less strongly stressed relative to surrounding words, as the words I and to in I have to go.
b. The unstressed portion of a metrical foot.
11. Magnetic dip.
12. A hollow or depression.
13. Sports A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the body is lowered by bending the elbows until the chin reaches the level of the bars and then is raised by straightening the arms.
14. Slang A pickpocket.
15. Slang A foolish or stupid person.
16. A preparation of finely shredded tobacco, usually placed between the lower lip and gum. Also called snuff.

[Middle English dippen, from Old English dyppan; see dheub- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 15, back-formation from dippy.]
Translations

dipping

[ˈdɪpɪŋ] N (Agr) → baño m de desinfección

dipping

[ˈdɪpɪŋ] n (of sheep) → bagno
References in classic literature ?
As I look at the full stream, the vivid grass, the delicate bright-green powder softening the outline of the great trunks and branches that gleam from under the bare purple boughs, I am in love with moistness, and envy the white ducks that are dipping their heads far into the water here among the withes, unmindful of the awkward appearance they make in the drier world above.
I should like well to hear them neigh over their hardly earned feed of corn, and see them, with their moist necks freed from the harness, dipping their eager nostrils into the muddy pond.
Dipping into his tobacco pocket, he thrust a loose handful of sticks into the ancient's hand and shoved the canoe adrift with no thought of how its helpless occupant would ever reach shore.
The draggling ends of a bright-red neckerchief were then disclosed, and he had even been at the pains of dipping parts of it in some liquid, to give it the appearance of having become stained by wear.
7000 feet, dipping our beam to an incoming Washington packet.
These he deposited in a heap on the big table, and dipping again, he fished out the stragglers and added them to the pile.
His hand, dipping swiftly into his inside breast pocket, appeared with the big Colt's automatic.
In the stern he saw a young bronzed god in scarlet hip-cloth dipping a flashing paddle.
Yet there are many pleasant half-hours to be spent in dipping here and there into the volumes of the Rambler or the Idler.
While consumers could be dipping less, their continued penchant for snacking could also suggest that they're trading over to other products -- such as refrigerated dressings -- for their dipping needs.
FOR farmers intending to carry out their own dipping, Bimedia vet Rachel Mallet said it has to be carried out correctly if it is to be effective.
There should be suitable process control checks on the dipping unit during production, and the depth of the paste should be measured manually or automatically.