directness


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.directness - trueness of course toward a goal; "rivaling a hawk in directness of aim"
characteristic - a distinguishing quality
downrightness, straightforwardness - the quality of being direct and straightforward; "what some people take for rudeness is really straightforwardness"
immediacy, immediateness - lack of an intervening or mediating agency; "the immediacy of television coverage"
pointedness - the quality of being obviously directed at a particular person or thing; "the pointedness of his sarcasm was unmistakable"
indirectness - having the characteristic of lacking a true course toward a goal
2.directness - the quality of being honest and straightforward in attitude and speech
honestness, honesty - the quality of being honest
ingenuousness - openly straightforward or frank

directness

noun honesty, candour, frankness, sincerity, plain speaking, bluntness, outspokenness, forthrightness, straightforwardness She spoke with a directness that made him blush.
Translations
مُباشَرَه
přímostupřímnost
ligefremhed
afdráttarleysi; hreinskilni
doğrudan doğruya olmadolaysızlık

directness

[daɪˈrektnɪs] N [of person, speech, reply] → franqueza f

directness

[daɪˈrɛktnɪs dɪˈrɛktnɪs] n [person, speech] → franchise fdirect object n (GRAMMAR)complément m d'objet direct

directness

nDirektheit f

directness

[daɪˈrɛktnɪs] n (of person, speech) → franchezza

direct

(diˈrekt) adjective
1. straight; following the quickest and shortest way. Is this the most direct route?
2. (of manner etc) straightforward and honest. a direct answer.
3. occurring as an immediate result. His dismissal was a direct result of his rudeness to the manager.
4. exact; complete. Her opinions are the direct opposite of his.
5. in an unbroken line of descent from father to son etc. He is a direct descendant of Napoleon.
verb
1. to point, aim or turn in a particular direction. He directed my attention towards the notice.
2. to show the way to. She directed him to the station.
3. to order or instruct. We will do as you direct.
4. to control or organize. A policeman was directing the traffic; to direct a film.
diˈrection (-ʃən) noun
1. (the) place or point to which one moves, looks etc. What direction did he go in?; They were heading in my direction (= towards me); I'll find my way all right – I've a good sense of direction.
2. guidance. They are under your direction.
3. (in plural) instructions (eg on how to get somewhere, use something etc). We asked the policeman for directions; I have lost the directions for this washing-machine.
4. the act of aiming or turning (something or someone) towards a certain point.
diˈrectional adjective
diˈrective (-tiv) noun
a general instruction from a higher authority about what is to be done etc.
diˈrectly adverb
1. in a direct manner. I went directly to the office.
2. almost at once. He will be here directly.
diˈrectness noun
diˈrector noun
a person or thing that directs, eg one of a group of persons who manage the affairs of a business or a person who is in charge of the making of a film, play etc. He is on the board of directors of our firm; The producer and the director quarrelled about the film.
diˈrectoryplural diˈrectories noun
a type of book giving names and addresses etc. a telephone directory.
References in classic literature ?
Order, precision, directness, are the radical merits of prose thought; and it is more than merely legitimate that they should form the criterion of prose style, because within the scope of those qualities, according to Mr.
But the chief peculiarity of his speech was its directness and appositeness.
Strickland had the directness of the fanatic and the ferocity of the apostle.
And so in spite of the friendliness and directness of their relations, Konstantin felt an awkwardness in leaving him alone.
It was impossible now to doubt the directness of Dorothea's confession.
You are," I said,--"and you will forgive my directness of expression,--you are the Primeval Male
I had been a mere lad then, and Moreau was, I suppose, about fifty,-- a prominent and masterful physiologist, well-known in scientific circles for his extraordinary imagination and his brutal directness in discussion.
He put the question with perfect delicacy but with unerring directness as well.
The next time Pollyanna met the Man, his eyes were gazing straight into hers, with a quizzical directness that made his face look really pleasant, Pollyanna thought.
True, the slavery and abasement in which she held me might have given me (such things often do so) the power to question her with abrupt directness (seeing that,, inasmuch as I figured in her eyes as a mere slave and nonentity, she could not very well have taken offence at any rude curiosity); but the fact was that, though she let me question her, she never returned me a single answer, and at times did not so much as notice me.
The young man much resented this directness of attack, and in the war of words which followed when they met he did not scruple publicly to insult Mr Clare, without respect for his gray hairs.
The work was of the same character as that which he had just been engaged on, but with the greater directness which surgery has than medicine; and a larger proportion of the patients suffered from those two diseases which a supine public allows, in its prudishness, to be spread broadcast.

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