dirk


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dirk

 (dûrk)
n.
A dagger.
tr.v. dirked, dirk·ing, dirks
To stab with a dirk.

[Scots durk.]

dirk

(dɜːk)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a dagger esp as formerly worn by Scottish Highlanders
vb (tr)
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) to stab with a dirk
[C16: from Scottish durk, perhaps from German Dolch dagger]

dirk

(dɜrk)

n.
1. a dagger.
v.t.
2. to stab with a dirk.
[1595–1605]

dirk


Past participle: dirked
Gerund: dirking

Imperative
dirk
dirk
Present
I dirk
you dirk
he/she/it dirks
we dirk
you dirk
they dirk
Preterite
I dirked
you dirked
he/she/it dirked
we dirked
you dirked
they dirked
Present Continuous
I am dirking
you are dirking
he/she/it is dirking
we are dirking
you are dirking
they are dirking
Present Perfect
I have dirked
you have dirked
he/she/it has dirked
we have dirked
you have dirked
they have dirked
Past Continuous
I was dirking
you were dirking
he/she/it was dirking
we were dirking
you were dirking
they were dirking
Past Perfect
I had dirked
you had dirked
he/she/it had dirked
we had dirked
you had dirked
they had dirked
Future
I will dirk
you will dirk
he/she/it will dirk
we will dirk
you will dirk
they will dirk
Future Perfect
I will have dirked
you will have dirked
he/she/it will have dirked
we will have dirked
you will have dirked
they will have dirked
Future Continuous
I will be dirking
you will be dirking
he/she/it will be dirking
we will be dirking
you will be dirking
they will be dirking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dirking
you have been dirking
he/she/it has been dirking
we have been dirking
you have been dirking
they have been dirking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dirking
you will have been dirking
he/she/it will have been dirking
we will have been dirking
you will have been dirking
they will have been dirking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dirking
you had been dirking
he/she/it had been dirking
we had been dirking
you had been dirking
they had been dirking
Conditional
I would dirk
you would dirk
he/she/it would dirk
we would dirk
you would dirk
they would dirk
Past Conditional
I would have dirked
you would have dirked
he/she/it would have dirked
we would have dirked
you would have dirked
they would have dirked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dirk - a relatively long dagger with a straight bladedirk - a relatively long dagger with a straight blade
dagger, sticker - a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Translations

dirk

[dɜːk] N (Scot) → puñal m

dirk

n (Scot) → Dolch m
References in classic literature ?
She slipped a dirk into him in as matter-of-course a way as another person would have harpooned a rat!
Suddenly that native rose at the bedside, and bent over me with his right hand lifted and a dirk in it aimed at my throat; but Luigi grabbed his wrist, pulled him downward, and drove his own knife into the man's neck.
Finally he took a wrong turn and ran a few steps past me, towards the hamlet, crying, "Johnny, Black Dog, Dirk," and other names, "you won't leave old Pew, mates--not old Pew
I understand you, Fernand; you would be revenged on him because I do not love you; you would cross your Catalan knife with his dirk.
His companion thrust aside his waistcoat, pointed to the handle of a dirk, and nodded.
He turned his eyes toward the speaker; it was Dirk Waldron.
After which he took a Scotch dirk in his left hand, and then turning to Athos, "Are you ready, monsieur?
Some would wear the Northwest button, and a formidable dirk, and assume something of a military air.
It was because I felt this that Dirk Stroeve was not to me, as to others, merely an object of ridicule.
1215 had been drawn aside, and that we, English yeomen's sons in homespun cloth, with dirk at belt, were waiting there to witness the writing of that stupendous page of history, the meaning whereof was to be translated to the common people some four hundred and odd years later by one Oliver Cromwell, who had deeply studied it.
In undress naval uniform, with a dirk, and holding his cap under his arm, he handed Kutuzov a garrison report and the keys of the town.
I give you my word that I lost my bearings more completely than ever since I strapped a middy's dirk to my belt.