disabled


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dis·a·bled

 (dĭs-ā′bəld)
adj.
1. Inoperative: a disabled vehicle.
2. Impaired, as in physical functioning: a disabled veteran; disabled children.
n.
(used with a pl. verb) Physically or mentally impaired people considered as a group: the physically disabled.
Usage Note: Disabled is the clear preference in contemporary American English for referring to people having either physical or mental impairments, with the impairments themselves preferably termed disabilities. Handicapped—a term derived from the world of sports gambling—is still in wide use but is often taken to be offensive, while more recent coinages such as differently abled or handicapable tend to be perceived as condescending euphemisms and have gained little currency. · The often-repeated recommendation to put the person before the disability would favor persons with disabilities over disabled persons and person with paraplegia over paraplegic. Such expressions are said to focus on the individual rather than on the particular functional limitation, and they are therefore considered by many to be more respectful. See Usage Note at handicapped.

disabled

(dɪˈseɪbəld)
adj
a. lacking one or more physical powers, such as the ability to walk or to coordinate one's movements, as from the effects of a disease or accident, or through mental impairment
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the disabled.
Usage: Nowadays it is better to refer to people with physical disabilities of various kinds by describing the specific difficulty in question rather than talking about the disabled as a group, which is considered somewhat offensive. Some people also object to the word disabled to refer to facilities for people with disabilites, and prefer the word accessible

dis•a•bled

(dɪsˈeɪ bəld)
usage: See cripple.

adj.
1. handicapped; incapacitated.
n.
2. the disabled, disabled persons collectively.
[1625–35]

disabled

handicapped

Someone who is disabled has an illness, injury or condition that restricts the way they can live, especially by making it difficult for them to move about.

There are many practical problems encountered by disabled people in the workplace.

Some people use handicapped with this meaning, but many people find this offensive.

The most sensitive ways of referring to people with a restricting physical condition are to call them people with disabilities or people with special needs.

Those who will gain the most are people with disabilities and their carers.
Employers should pay for the training of young people with special needs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disabled - people collectively who are crippled or otherwise physically handicappeddisabled - people collectively who are crippled or otherwise physically handicapped; "technology to help the elderly and the disabled"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
the halt - (archaic) lame persons collectively; "the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind"--Luke 14:21
Adj.1.disabled - incapable of functioning as a consequence of injury or illness
unfit - not in good physical or mental condition; out of condition; "fat and very unfit"; "certified as unfit for army service"; "drunk and unfit for service"

disabled

adjective differently abled, physically challenged, handicapped, weakened, crippled, paralysed, impaired, lame, mutilated, maimed, incapacitated, infirm, bedridden the practical problems encountered by disabled people in the workplace
strong, sound, fit, healthy, robust, sturdy, hale, hearty, able-bodied
Translations
عاجِزعاجِز، مُقْعَدمُعَاق
postiženýchromýinvalidnípostižení
handicappetinvalid
vammainenvammaisetinvalidi
invalidosobe s invaliditetom
rokkant
bæklaîur, fatlaîur
身体障害のある身体障害者
장애가 있는장애인
invalidný
invalideninvalidi
funktionshindradfunktionshindrade
คนพิการพิการ
người tàn tậttàn tật

disabled

[dɪsˈeɪbld]
A. ADJ [person] → minusválido, discapacitado
B. NPL the disabledlos discapacitados, los minusválidos

disabled

[dɪˈseɪbəld]
adj (= handicapped) → infirme, handicapé(e), invalide (= maimed) → mutilé(e) (= infirm) (through illness, old age)impotent(e)
npl
the disabled → les handicapés mpl

disabled

adj
behindert; severely/partially disabledschwerbehindert/leicht behindert; physically disabledkörperbehindert; mentally disabledgeistig behindert; disabled ex-servicemanKriegsversehrte(r) m; disabled toiletBehindertentoilette f
tank, gununbrauchbar; shipnicht seetüchtig
pl the disableddie Behinderten pl; the war disableddie Kriegsversehrten pl

disabled

[dɪsˈeɪbld]
1. adjhandicappato/a, invalido/a; (maimed) → mutilato/a; (through illness, old age) → inabile
disabled ex-serviceman → invalido di guerra
2. the disabled nplgli invalidi

disable

(disˈeibl) verb
to reduce the ability or strength of; to cripple. He was disabled during the war.
disability (disəˈbiləti) plural disaˈbilities noun
something which disables. He has a disability which prevents him from walking very far.
ˈdisability payment noun
an amount of money regularly paid by the government to disabled people.
disˈabled adjective
lacking ability or strength; crippled. a disabled soldier.
disˈablement noun

disabled

عاجِز, مُعَاق postižení, postižený handicappet behindert, Behinderte ανάπηρος, άτομα με αναπηρία discapacitado, discapacitados, minusválidos vammainen, vammaiset handicapé, handicapés invalid, osobe s invaliditetom disabile, disabili 身体障害のある, 身体障害者 장애가 있는, 장애인 gehandicapten, invalide de funksjonshemmede, funksjonshemmet niepełnosprawni, niepełnosprawny deficiente, deficientes инвалиды, недееспособный funktionshindrad, funktionshindrade คนพิการ, พิการ özürlü, özürlüler người tàn tật, tàn tật 残疾人, 残障的

disabled

a. inválido-a; impedido-a; incapacitado-a.

disabled

adj discapacitado; (esp. with respect to work, possibly temporarily) incapacitado; developmentally — con discapacidad del desarrollo; — person discapacitado -da mf; gravely — severamente or gravemente discapacitado; intellectually — con discapacidad intelectual; physically — con discapacidad física
References in classic literature ?
It stood in a small side room which looked out across a narrow grass plot toward the shed, where there was a disabled boat lying keel upward.
He did not come to the surface until he had passed the point below where her father stood, and then struggling feebly, as if stunned or disabled by a blow.
When darkness came on, sky and sea roared and split with the thunder, and blazed with the lightning, that showed the disabled masts fluttering here and there with the rags which the first fury of the tempest had left for its after sport.
After Rory was disabled I often went in the carriage with a mare named Peggy, who stood in the next stall to mine.
One of the consequences of this episode was that the first joints of three of the little boy's fingers were permanently disabled, and another that thereafter he always had to be beaten before he set out to work, whenever there was fresh snow on the ground.
She said that my enchantment had disabled those knights; they were not riding on, because they couldn't; wait, they would drop out of their saddles presently, and we would get their horses and harness.
That was a good fight, but it could not count, partly because it did not last the lawful fifteen minutes (of actual fighting), and partly because neither man was disabled by his wound.
It was Miss Murdstone who was arrived, and a gloomy-looking lady she was; dark, like her brother, whom she greatly resembled in face and voice; and with very heavy eyebrows, nearly meeting over her large nose, as if, being disabled by the wrongs of her sex from wearing whiskers, she had carried them to that account.
For, of course my being disabled could now be no longer kept out of view.
When the fight became visible, half the knights on each side were dismounted, some by the dexterity of their adversary's lance, some by the superior weight and strength of opponents, which had borne down both horse and man, some lay stretched on earth as if never more to rise, some had already gained their feet, and were closing hand to hand with those of their antagonists who were in the same predicament, and several on both sides, who had received wounds by which they were disabled, were stopping their blood by their scarfs, and endeavouring to extricate themselves from the tumult.
But they gave good account of themselves, and before they had been overborne by force of numbers they had killed two and disabled three more.
Not to confer in each case a degree of power commensurate to the end, would be to violate the most obvious rules of prudence and propriety, and improvidently to trust the great interests of the nation to hands which are disabled from managing them with vigor and success.

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