disadvantage


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dis·ad·van·tage

 (dĭs′əd-văn′tĭj)
n.
1. An unfavorable condition or position: students who are at a disadvantage because they don't own computers.
2. Something that places one in an unfavorable condition or position: A disadvantage to living there is that you'd have no access to public transportation.
3. Damage or loss, especially to reputation or finances; detriment: High gasoline prices have worked to the company's disadvantage.
tr.v. dis·ad·van·taged, dis·ad·van·tag·ing, dis·ad·van·tag·es
To put at a disadvantage; hinder or harm.

[Middle English disavauntage, from Old French desavantage : des-, dis- + avantage, advantage; see advantage.]
Synonyms: disadvantage, detriment, drawback, handicap
These nouns denote a condition, circumstance, or characteristic unfavorable to success: Poor health is a disadvantage to athletes. The lack of a parking lot has been a detriment to the museum. Every job has its drawbacks. Illiteracy is a serious handicap in life.

disadvantage

(ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ)
n
1. an unfavourable circumstance, state of affairs, thing, person, etc
2. injury, loss, or detriment
3. an unfavourable condition or situation (esp in the phrase at a disadvantage)
vb
(tr) to put at a disadvantage; handicap

dis•ad•van•tage

(ˌdɪs ədˈvæn tɪdʒ, -ˈvɑn-)

n., v. -taged, -tag•ing. n.
1. absence or deprivation of advantage or equality.
2. the state or an instance of being in an unfavorable circumstance or condition: to be at a disadvantage.
3. something that puts one in an unfavorable position or condition: A bad temper is a disadvantage.
4. injury to interest, reputation, credit, profit, etc.; loss.
v.t.
5. to subject to disadvantage.
[1350–1400; < Old French desavantage. See dis-1, advantage]

Disadvantage

 

(See also PREDICAMENT, VULNERABILITY.)

behind the eightball At a disadvantage; in a jam or difficult situation. Originally American, this expression is said to have come from the game of Kelly pool. In one variation of this game, all the balls except the black eightball must be pocketed in a certain order. If, in the course of play, another ball strikes the eightball, the player is penalized. Thus, a player finding the eightball between the cueball and the one he intends to pocket is indeed in a disadvantageous position. John O’Hara used the phrase in Appointment in Samarra (1934):

You get signing checks for prospects down at the country club, and you wind up behind the eightball.

get the short end of the stick See VICTIMIZATION.

have two strikes against one To be at a disadvantage, and thus have less chance of successfully reaching one’s goal or following through with one’s plans. This expression comes from baseball, where a batter has three chances to hit a ball in the strike zone. Sometimes this expression alludes to a disadvantage over which one has no control, such as one’s sex, race, or ethnic background.

on the hip At a disadvantage, in an extremely vulnerable or helpless position, over a barrel. There is some dispute as to whether this expression derived from hunting or from wrestling. The wrestling theory seems more plausible and is supported by the OED. The phrase, now archaic, dates from the latter half of the 15th century. It appeared in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice:

If I can catch him once upon the hip,
I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. (I, iii)

play with loaded dice To undertake a project or other matter in which the odds are against success; to have little chance. Literally, loaded dice are those which have been fraudulently weighted to increase the chances of throwing certain combinations—usually losing ones—in craps or other games of chance. Figuratively, then, to play with loaded dice is to engage in some undertaking in which the odds are fixed so that there is little chance of success. A related expression, play with a stacked deck, has the same implications and refers to cheating by stacking a deck of cards, i.e., arranging them in a certain order to force a desired result.

suck the hind teat See VICTIMIZATION.

underdog A person in an inferior position; one who is expected to be defeated in a race, election, etc.; a dark horse. This expression may allude to a canine skirmish, in which both dogs vie for the more advantageous top position. The familiar phrase, while retaining its sense of an unlikely victor in a competition, is often used today to describe the victim of social conventions, government bureaucracy, and other virtually omnipotent institutions.

The mission of the Democratic party is to fight for the under-dog. (Daily Chronicle, June, 1892)

disadvantage


Past participle: disadvantaged
Gerund: disadvantaging

Imperative
disadvantage
disadvantage
Present
I disadvantage
you disadvantage
he/she/it disadvantages
we disadvantage
you disadvantage
they disadvantage
Preterite
I disadvantaged
you disadvantaged
he/she/it disadvantaged
we disadvantaged
you disadvantaged
they disadvantaged
Present Continuous
I am disadvantaging
you are disadvantaging
he/she/it is disadvantaging
we are disadvantaging
you are disadvantaging
they are disadvantaging
Present Perfect
I have disadvantaged
you have disadvantaged
he/she/it has disadvantaged
we have disadvantaged
you have disadvantaged
they have disadvantaged
Past Continuous
I was disadvantaging
you were disadvantaging
he/she/it was disadvantaging
we were disadvantaging
you were disadvantaging
they were disadvantaging
Past Perfect
I had disadvantaged
you had disadvantaged
he/she/it had disadvantaged
we had disadvantaged
you had disadvantaged
they had disadvantaged
Future
I will disadvantage
you will disadvantage
he/she/it will disadvantage
we will disadvantage
you will disadvantage
they will disadvantage
Future Perfect
I will have disadvantaged
you will have disadvantaged
he/she/it will have disadvantaged
we will have disadvantaged
you will have disadvantaged
they will have disadvantaged
Future Continuous
I will be disadvantaging
you will be disadvantaging
he/she/it will be disadvantaging
we will be disadvantaging
you will be disadvantaging
they will be disadvantaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disadvantaging
you have been disadvantaging
he/she/it has been disadvantaging
we have been disadvantaging
you have been disadvantaging
they have been disadvantaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disadvantaging
you will have been disadvantaging
he/she/it will have been disadvantaging
we will have been disadvantaging
you will have been disadvantaging
they will have been disadvantaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disadvantaging
you had been disadvantaging
he/she/it had been disadvantaging
we had been disadvantaging
you had been disadvantaging
they had been disadvantaging
Conditional
I would disadvantage
you would disadvantage
he/she/it would disadvantage
we would disadvantage
you would disadvantage
they would disadvantage
Past Conditional
I would have disadvantaged
you would have disadvantaged
he/she/it would have disadvantaged
we would have disadvantaged
you would have disadvantaged
they would have disadvantaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disadvantage - the quality of having an inferior or less favorable position
liability - the quality of being something that holds you back
unfavorableness, unfavourableness - the quality of not being encouraging or indicative of success
limitation - the quality of being limited or restricted; "it is a good plan but it has serious limitations"
shortcoming, defect - a failing or deficiency; "that interpretation is an unfortunate defect of our lack of information"
nuisance value, awkwardness - the quality of an embarrassing situation; "he sensed the awkwardness of his proposal"
deprivation, loss - the disadvantage that results from losing something; "his loss of credibility led to his resignation"; "losing him is no great deprivation"
drawback - the quality of being a hindrance; "he pointed out all the drawbacks to my plan"
penalty - the disadvantage or painful consequences of an action or condition; "neglected his health and paid the penalty"
unfavorable position, inferiority - the quality of being a competitive disadvantage
inexpedience, inexpediency - the quality of being unsuited to the end in view
unprofitability, unprofitableness - the quality of affording no gain or no benefit or no profit
advantage, vantage - the quality of having a superior or more favorable position; "the experience gave him the advantage over me"
Verb1.disadvantage - put at a disadvantage; hinder, harm; "This rule clearly disadvantages me"
hamper, handicap, hinder - put at a disadvantage; "The brace I have to wear is hindering my movements"
discriminate, single out, separate - treat differently on the basis of sex or race
prejudice - disadvantage by prejudice
advantage - give an advantage to; "This system advantages the rich"

disadvantage

noun
1. drawback, trouble, burden, weakness, handicap, liability, minus (informal), flaw, hardship, nuisance, snag, inconvenience, downside, impediment, hindrance, privation, weak point, fly in the ointment (informal) They suffer the disadvantage of having been political exiles.
drawback benefit, advantage, merit, convenience
2. harm, loss, damage, injury, hurt, prejudice, detriment, disservice An attempt to prevent an election would be to their disadvantage.
harm help, benefit, aid, profit, gain, advantage, convenience
verb
1. handicap, limit, restrict, hamstring, hamper, hold back, hinder, retard, impede, hobble, place at a disadvantage Competition could reduce liquidity and disadvantage some investors.
at a disadvantage exposed, vulnerable, wide open, unprotected, defenceless, open to attack, assailable Children from poor families were at a distinct disadvantage.

disadvantage

noun
An unfavorable condition, circumstance, or characteristic:
Translations
سيئةعَيْبمَضَرَّه
nevýhodanedostatek
ulempe
haitta
nedostatak
ókostur
不利
불리
blogesnėje padėtyjenenaudingasnepalanki aplinkybėnepalankioje padėtyje
neizdevīgs stāvoklistraucējumstrūkums
nevýhoda
pomanjkljivost
nackdel
ข้อเสีย
sự bất lợi

disadvantage

[ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ]
A. Ndesventaja f, inconveniente m
to sb's disadvantageperjudicial para algn
to the disadvantage ofen perjuicio or detrimento de
to be at a disadvantageestar en desventaja, estar en una situación desventajosa
this put him at a disadvantageesto lo dejó en situación desventajosa
B. VTperjudicar

disadvantage

[ˌdɪsədˈvæntɪdʒ ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ] ndésavantage m, inconvénient m
to be at a disadvantage → être désavantagé(e)
to be to sb's disadvantage, to work to sb's disadvantage → désavantager qn

disadvantage

nNachteil m; (= detriment also)Schaden m; to be at a disadvantagebenachteiligt or im Nachteil sein; he felt at a disadvantageer fühlte sich benachteiligt; to put somebody at a disadvantagejdn benachteiligen; to show oneself at a disadvantagesich von einer ungünstigen or unvorteilhaften Seite zeigen; it would be to your disadvantagees wäre zu Ihrem Nachteil

disadvantage

[ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ] nsvantaggio
to be to sb's disadvantage → tornare a svantaggio or sfavore di qn
to be at a disadvantage → essere svantaggiato/a

disadvantage

(disədˈvaːntidʒ) noun
something which makes a difficulty or which is an unfavourable circumstance. There are several disadvantages to this plan.
disadvantageous (disӕdvənˈteidʒəs) adjective
at a disadvantage
in an unfavourable position. His power was strengthened by the fact that he had us all at a disadvantage.

disadvantage

عَيْب nevýhoda ulempe Nachteil μειονέκτημα desventaja haitta inconvénient nedostatak svantaggio 不利 불리 nadeel ulempe niekorzyść desvantagem недостаток nackdel ข้อเสีย dezavantaj sự bất lợi 劣势

disadvantage

n. desventaja; alguna capacidad disminuida.

disadvantage

n inconveniente m, desventaja
References in classic literature ?
We proceeded with all possible expedition until we came within fifteen miles of where Boonsborough now stands, and where we were fired upon by a party of Indians that killed two, and wounded two of our number; yet, although surprised and taken at a disadvantage, we stood our ground.
But, after all, what worked most to the young carpenter's disadvantage was, first, the reserve and sternness of his natural disposition, and next, the fact of his not being a church-communicant, and the suspicion of his holding heretical tenets in matters of religion and polity.
But if we Southern whale-fishers are not so snugly housed aloft as Captain Sleet and his Greenland-men were; yet that disadvantage is greatly counterbalanced by the widely contrasting serenity of those seductive seas in which we South fishers mostly float.
Even if he took to begging, he would be at a disadvantage, for reasons which he was to discover in good time.
Not even all the disadvantage of nasal intonation could prevent the effect of the naturally fine voices, in airs at once wild and spirited.
More than once I had seen a noble who had gotten his enemy at a disadvantage, stop to pray before cutting his throat; more than once I had seen a noble, after ambushing and despatching his enemy, retire to the nearest wayside shrine and humbly give thanks, without even waiting to rob the body.
I flatter myself," replied Elinor, "that even under the disadvantage of better rooms and a broader staircase, you will hereafter find your own house as faultless as you now do this.
I am sure,' my poor mother went on, at a grievous disadvantage, and with many tears, 'I don't want anybody to go.
It was not with me then, as it was in later life, when I fell into the society of the Passions, and compared them with Collins and Wopsle, rather to the disadvantage of both gentlemen.
True is, less firmly arm'd, Some disadvantage we endur'd and paine, Till now not known, but known as soon contemnd, Since now we find this our Empyreal forme Incapable of mortal injurie Imperishable, and though peirc'd with wound, Soon closing, and by native vigour heal'd.
They would often strip me naked from top to toe, and lay me at full length in their bosoms; wherewith I was much disgusted because, to say the truth, a very offensive smell came from their skins; which I do not mention, or intend, to the disadvantage of those excellent ladies, for whom I have all manner of respect; but I conceive that my sense was more acute in proportion to my littleness, and that those illustrious persons were no more disagreeable to their lovers, or to each other, than people of the same quality are with us in England.
Of a truth, senor governor," said the carver, "your worship is in the right of it in everything you have said; and I promise you in the name of all the inhabitants of this island that they will serve your worship with all zeal, affection, and good-will, for the mild kind of government you have given a sample of to begin with, leaves them no ground for doing or thinking anything to your worship's disadvantage.