disanalogous

disanalogous

(ˌdɪsəˈnæləɡəs)
adj
formal not analogous
References in periodicals archive ?
The three relatively realistic decision scenarios we have discussed (Mere Addition, Extinction Risk, Space Settlement) are more like insurance cases, and are crucially disanalogous to the example of setting cats on fire.
28) As I shall discuss in detail in a moment, Waldron's disenfranchisement scenario is in a crucial respect disanalogous to the circumstances under which I claim that a speech restriction can render immoral the enforcement of a downstream law.
Hence, the two statutes could be seen, on these grounds, to be somewhat disanalogous.
83) For now, I will only conclude by saying that if Eliot's thesis is correct, then it seems that we may today be in a position not so disanalogous to that reported at the end of the book of Joshua in what Christians call the Old Testament.
Determining which of those two conclusions makes more sense, or whether the two situations are in fact relevantly disanalogous (despite having some similarities), requires considering what the battle-damage exception's fundamental justification is in the first place.
84) The court found Poindexter applicable despite recognizing that the two cases involved disanalogous defendants--John Poindexter was national security advisor, and the classified evidence in that case was equally known to both sides.
20) Here, while there is a market for intercourse and carrying fetuses, this is likely not an accurate guide to the market value for unconsented-to versions of these acts because the acts are so different as to be disanalogous.
These groups are disanalogous in a variety of respects to groups defined by such characteristics as race, sex, and national origin.
This might seem reminiscent of the vitalist claim that no physical account could explain life, but the cases are disanalogous.
Joyce) Joyce states that morality is disanalogous to social practices such as etiquette: our practice of holding wrongdoers morally accountable presupposes that wrongdoers have moral reasons not to act as they did.
But the two cases are entirely disanalogous because human beings are conscious, autonomous creatures who were born innocent and are vulnerable to pain, and whose rights to life are natural.
ii], and so the question whether the epistemic situations of the ordinary perceiver and the kaleidoscope perceiver are disanalogous up to the point that only the former has R-knowledge [reflective knowledge], remains open.