disaster capitalism


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disaster capitalism

n
(Economics) censorious the practice (by a government, regime, etc) of taking advantage of a major disaster to adopt liberal economic policies that the population would be less likely to accept under normal circumstances
References in periodicals archive ?
SUMMARY: The 2007 publication of Naomi Klein's, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism followed the Toronto journalist's 1999 groundbreaking and influential book No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, a critique of multinational corporations, advertising and corporate culture that became a handbook for anti-globalization activists around the world.
I guess I'm not holding out the fantasy that governing Republicans, either at the state level or the federal level, have any chance of meeting this crisis with anything other than what I've called disaster capitalism.
With that in mind, her latest book, No is Not Enough: Defeating the New Shock Politics, is largely the culmination of all that she learnt from her previous best-sellers - namely No Logo (2000), The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007), and This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate (2014).
He cites disaster capitalism as the ideology of our age, and seeks a more equal economic system and truly representative democracy.
DISASTER CAPITALISM as seen today often feeds off the same forces that fuel "crony capitalist" practices.
The ugly face of empire and disaster capitalism is visible all over the world.
Discussion encompasses various agreements and organizations, such as the Copenhagen Accord, the TRIPS Agreement, and the World Intellectual Property Organization, as well as subjects such as technology transfer, disaster capitalism, patent law and compulsory licensing, climate innovation centers and public sector licensing, and patent pools and clearing houses such as the Eco-Patent Commons.
So it was quite a logical progression for me to go from writing about disaster capitalism in The Shock Doctrine to writing about climate change.
An environmentalism disregarding war, imperialism, and the subaltern is merely acquiescence to the governmental instrumentalization and commodification of catastrophe, and functions as yet another excuse for the brutal coercion of populations--a corollary of what Naomi Klein calls disaster capitalism.
If we are to cast off our old habits of soft imperialism and disaster capitalism, we will require more rigor, nuance, and thorough self-analysis.
In the second case study, Collins and Jimenez exemplify neoliberal production of vulnerability in the emergence of disaster capitalism, the transfer of technological risks from global north-to-south, and the peri-urbanisation of vulnerability in the global south.
1) In her book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007), she contends that Milton Friedman championed the kinds of interventions that allowed Pinochet to overthrow the legal president of Chile in 1973.
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