disbenefit

(redirected from disbenefits)

dis·ben·e·fit

 (dĭs-bĕn′ə-fĭt)
n.
Something that is a disadvantage or has a deleterious effect; a drawback.

disbenefit

(dɪsˈbɛnɪfɪt)
n
formal Austral a disadvantage
References in periodicals archive ?
A report to go before Snowdonia's planners reads: "On balance it is considered that the potential benefits in approving such an HEP (Hydro Electric Power) scheme of this nature are not outweighed by the disbenefits of the scheme.
The Kerslake review into the authority's failings states: "There must be demonstrable improvement over the next year or the panel will also need to decide whether further consideration is needed to establish the relative benefits and disbenefits of breaking the authority up.
We also estimated substantial negative sensitivities or disbenefits from emissions originating in large U.
As the capital reaches nearly eight million, the evidence that our 'motor' is stalling is increasingly clear, with the benefits of agglomeration increasingly outweighed by the disbenefits of congestion and its associated costs.
The airport submission goes on to warn: "We are concerned that as the North East is not included in the scheme, our region will experience many of the disbenefits without the same degree of benefits enjoyed by other key centres.
They reported certain occupational risks and disbenefits to these women workers including low salaries, and deficient enforcement of healthy and safety regulations.
Failure to Consider Cost and Health Disbenefits in Revising the Ozone
Yet as I wrote recently "The benefits of retail modernization in emerging economies are often assumed, and indeed seem to underlie government policy in more than one country, but the balance of benefits and disbenefits is contested, with much concern about the impact on local traders and on local culture, for example" (21).
Table 2 illustrates key expectations and disbenefits of the introduced FIS.
Thus German VET is part of a much broader coherent social system that offers employment protection in return for the disbenefits to the individual of early tracking.
Those of us who oppose it know there are benefits, but there are enormous disbenefits which have not been properly explored in the planning process.
Discussing the role of geoscientists, the author stresses their obligation to use their knowledge and position to explain clearly the benefits and disbenefits of mineral development to society.