discomfort

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dis·com·fort

 (dĭs-kŭm′fərt)
n.
1. Mental or bodily distress.
2. Something that disturbs one's comfort; an annoyance.
tr.v. dis·com·fort·ed, dis·com·fort·ing, dis·com·forts
To make uncomfortable; distress.

[Middle English, from Old French desconfort, from desconforter, to discourage : des-, dis- + conforter, to strengthen; see comfort.]

dis·com′fort·a·ble (-kŭm′fər-tə-bəl, -kŭmf′tə-bəl, -kŭmf′tər-) adj.
dis·com′fort·ing·ly adv.

discomfort

(dɪsˈkʌmfət)
n
1. an inconvenience, distress, or mild pain
2. something that disturbs or deprives of ease
vb
(tr) to make uncomfortable or uneasy

dis•com•fort

(dɪsˈkʌm fərt)

n.
1. an absence of comfort or ease; hardship or mild pain.
v.t.
2. to disturb the comfort or happiness of; make uneasy.
[1300–50; Middle English: to discourage, pain < Anglo-French descomforter to sadden, grieve.]
dis•com′fort•a•ble (-fər tə bəl, -ˈkʌmf tə-) adj.

Discomfort

 

See Also: PAIN

  1. Comfortable as a toothache —Mark Twain
  2. (Kiss) comfortless as frozen water to a starved snake —William Shakespeare
  3. Comfortless as salt —Sylvia Plath
  4. Damp like a vault —Maurice Hewlett
  5. Felt like a door-to-door salesman, pushing unwanted sets of nature encyclopedias complete with fake walnut case —Sue Grafton
  6. Indigestible as Christmas dinner —Patricia Ferguson See Also: FOOD AND DRINK
  7. I’ve a head like a concertina, I’ve a tongue like a button-stick, I’ve a mouth like an old potato —Rudyard Kipling

    Kipling’s triple simile to describe a hangover, continues as follows: “And I’m more than a little sick, but I’ve had my fun.”

    See Also: DRINKING, TASTE

  8. Self-conscious as a stammer —Delmore Schwartz
  9. (Joel’s fingers are cold.) The apartment is like a football game in the rain —Margaret Atwood
  10. Uncomfortable as running a marathon in high-heeled pumps —Anon
  11. Uncomfortable as trying to sleep standing up —Elyse Sommer
  12. An uncomfortable feeling, like finding oneself in the same cell, and for the same crime, as a man one repudiated on every ground —John Fowles
  13. Uneasy as a dog in a vet’s waiting room —Anon
  14. Nothing unsettles man like a bed of stinging nettles —W. S. Gilbert

discomfort


Past participle: discomforted
Gerund: discomforting

Imperative
discomfort
discomfort
Present
I discomfort
you discomfort
he/she/it discomforts
we discomfort
you discomfort
they discomfort
Preterite
I discomforted
you discomforted
he/she/it discomforted
we discomforted
you discomforted
they discomforted
Present Continuous
I am discomforting
you are discomforting
he/she/it is discomforting
we are discomforting
you are discomforting
they are discomforting
Present Perfect
I have discomforted
you have discomforted
he/she/it has discomforted
we have discomforted
you have discomforted
they have discomforted
Past Continuous
I was discomforting
you were discomforting
he/she/it was discomforting
we were discomforting
you were discomforting
they were discomforting
Past Perfect
I had discomforted
you had discomforted
he/she/it had discomforted
we had discomforted
you had discomforted
they had discomforted
Future
I will discomfort
you will discomfort
he/she/it will discomfort
we will discomfort
you will discomfort
they will discomfort
Future Perfect
I will have discomforted
you will have discomforted
he/she/it will have discomforted
we will have discomforted
you will have discomforted
they will have discomforted
Future Continuous
I will be discomforting
you will be discomforting
he/she/it will be discomforting
we will be discomforting
you will be discomforting
they will be discomforting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been discomforting
you have been discomforting
he/she/it has been discomforting
we have been discomforting
you have been discomforting
they have been discomforting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been discomforting
you will have been discomforting
he/she/it will have been discomforting
we will have been discomforting
you will have been discomforting
they will have been discomforting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been discomforting
you had been discomforting
he/she/it had been discomforting
we had been discomforting
you had been discomforting
they had been discomforting
Conditional
I would discomfort
you would discomfort
he/she/it would discomfort
we would discomfort
you would discomfort
they would discomfort
Past Conditional
I would have discomforted
you would have discomforted
he/she/it would have discomforted
we would have discomforted
you would have discomforted
they would have discomforted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discomfort - the state of being tense and feeling paindiscomfort - the state of being tense and feeling pain
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
incommodiousness, inconvenience - an inconvenient discomfort
malaise, unease, uneasiness - physical discomfort (as mild sickness or depression)
hangover, katzenjammer - disagreeable aftereffects from the use of drugs (especially alcohol)
wretchedness - the character of being uncomfortable and unpleasant; "the wretchedness for which these prisons became known"; "the grey wretchedness of the rain"
comfort, comfortableness - a state of being relaxed and feeling no pain; "he is a man who enjoys his comfort"; "she longed for the comfortableness of her armchair"
2.discomfort - an uncomfortable feeling of mental painfulness or distress
hurt, suffering - feelings of mental or physical pain

discomfort

noun
1. pain, suffering, hurt, smarting, ache, throbbing, irritation, tenderness, pang, malaise, twinge, soreness He suffered some discomfort, but no real pain.
pain ease, comfort
3. inconvenience, trouble, difficulty, bother, hardship, irritation, hassle (informal), nuisance, uphill (S. African), annoyance, awkwardness, unpleasantness, vexation the hazards and discomforts of primitive continental travel
verb
1. make uncomfortable, worry, trouble, shake, alarm, disturb, distress, unsettle, ruffle, unnerve, disquiet, perturb, discomfit, discompose World leaders will have been greatly discomforted by these events.
make uncomfortable ease, comfort, reassure, soothe, alleviate, solace, assuage

discomfort

noun
1. The state or quality of being inconvenient:
2. Something that causes difficulty, trouble, or lack of ease:
verb
1. To cause inconvenience for:
2. To cause (a person) to be self-consciously distressed:
Translations
عَدَم ارْتِياحمُضايَقَه، إزْعاج
bolestnepohodlípotíž
ubehagubekvemmelighed
kényelmetlenségrossz érzés
óòægindi
nepatogumas
neērtība
nepohodlie

discomfort

[dɪsˈkʌmfət] N (= lack of comfort) → incomodidad f; (= uneasiness) → incomodidad f, turbación f; (physical) → molestia f, malestar m
the injury gave him some discomfortla herida le causaba molestia

discomfort

[dɪsˈkʌmfərt] n
(= mild pain) → gêne f
to be in discomfort → éprouver une sensation de gêne
(= unease) → embarras m, gêne f
(= lack of comfort) [place, journey] → manque m de confortdisco music ndisco m

discomfort

n (lit)Beschwerden pl; (fig: = uneasiness, embarrassment) → Unbehagen nt; to feel some discomfortsich nicht wohlfühlen; the injury gives me a little discomfort now and againdie Verletzung verursacht mir ab und zu leichte Beschwerden; much to my discomfort he offered to payes war mir sehr unangenehm, dass er zahlen wollte; the discomforts of campingdie Unannehmlichkeiten des Zeltens

discomfort

[dɪsˈkʌmfət] n (lack of comfort) → scomodità f inv; (uneasiness) → disagio, imbarazzo
his wound gave him some discomfort → la ferita gli procurava un certo disagio

discomfort

(disˈkamfət) noun
1. the state of being uncomfortable; pain. Her broken leg caused her great discomfort.
2. something that causes lack of comfort. the discomforts of living in a tent.

discomfort

n. incomodidad, malestar, aflicción.

discomfort

n molestia, (euph) dolor m; You’re going to feel a little discomfort..Va a sentir un poco de dolor.
References in classic literature ?
For this reason a sleeping apartment should never be furnished with a fire, which is one of the luxurious discomforts of the rich.
To be sure he looks forward to the approach of night to make up for all these discomforts on the bed that awaits him, which, unless by some fault of his, never sins by being over narrow, for he can easily measure out on the ground as he likes, and roll himself about in it to his heart's content without any fear of the sheets slipping away from him.
Moreover, they were experienced travelers and had learned not to fret over inconveniences and discomforts.
However, the widow made a pretty fair show of astonishment, and heaped so many com- pliments and so much gratitude upon Huck that he almost forgot the nearly intolerable discomfort of his new clothes in the entirely intolerable discomfort of being set up as a target for everybody's gaze and everybody's laudations.
Therefore if these surroundings, this discomfort, not to mention the appalling overtures of our lady friends, are distressing to you, why, consider how much more so they must be to me
He, somewhat to my discomfort, enticed her from the room to have a run in the hall, and thence into the garden.
Besides it felt so uncomfortable that he quickly decided that he preferred the shame to the discomfort.
Hence much noisy contention, to the great discomfort even of Royalty.
An indescribable sense of depression and discomfort kept him waking through darkness and daylight alike.
Edna seated herself with every appearance of discomfort.
The Law of Effect is that: Of several responses made to the same situation, those which are accompanied or closely followed by satisfaction to the animal will, other things being equal, be more firmly connected with the situation, so that, when it recurs, they will be more likely to recur; those which are accompanied or closely followed by discomfort to the animal will, other things being equal, have their connections with that situation weakened, so that, when it recurs, they will be less likely to occur.
Hilbery asked for further details of this extraordinary house, and interposed a few speculations about the meeting between Keats and Coleridge in a lane, which tided over the discomfort of the moment, and drew Katharine on to further descriptions and indiscretions.