disconcerted

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dis·con·cert

 (dĭs′kən-sûrt′)
tr.v. dis·con·cert·ed, dis·con·cert·ing, dis·con·certs
1. To cause to lose composure; embarrass or confuse: He was disconcerted by the teacher's angry tone. See Synonyms at embarrass.
2. To frustrate (plans, for example) by throwing into disorder; disarrange.

[Obsolete French disconcerter, from Old French desconcerter : des-, dis- + concerter, to bring into agreement (from Old Italian concertare; see concert).]

dis′con·cert′ing·ly adv.

disconcerted

(ˌdɪskənˈsɜːtɪd)
adj
perturbed, embarrassed, or confused
ˌdisconˈcertedly adv
ˌdisconˈcertedness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disconcerted - having self-possession upset; thrown into confusion; "the hecklers pelted the discombobulated speaker with anything that came to hand"; "looked at each other dumbly, quite disconcerted"- G.B.Shaw
discomposed - having your composure disturbed; "looked about with a wandering and discomposed air"

disconcerted

adjective disturbed, worried, troubled, thrown (informal), upset, confused, embarrassed, annoyed, rattled (informal), distracted, at sea, unsettled, bewildered, shook up (informal), flurried, ruffled, taken aback, flustered, perturbed, fazed, nonplussed, flummoxed, caught off balance, out of countenance He was disconcerted to find his fellow diners already seated.
Translations
desconcertado

disconcerted

[ˌdɪskənˈsɜːrtɪd] adj [+ person] → déconcerté(e), décontenancé(e)

disconcerted

[ˌdɪskənˈsɜːtɪd] adjsconcertato/a
References in classic literature ?
It chanced so with me,' said Bradley, looking disconcertedly about him.
The poem appeared to be disconcertedly open; it churned out meaning endlessly as contemporary criticism demonstrates.
When she had glanced down somewhat disconcertedly (she was not used to having comparative strangers touching her) at that black hand, she had had the impression, strange and fleeting and scarcely conscious, that it was not his hand resting on her, or any part of him, but rather some dark and unknown part of herself which had suddenly, for the first time ever, surfaced, appearing like a stigmata or an ugly black-and-blue mark at the place he had touched.